Transforming Your Business Shouldn’t Have to Be Death-Defying

first_imgThe month of May, and specifically EMC World, has become a regular reflection point for me. As I head into my third EMC World this week, I reflect back to year one where – as the newly appointed head of what was then EMC’s Backup Recovery Systems division, my primary mission was to evolve our approach to backup and archive. Last year, at my second EMC World, we amped up our portfolio by adding replication and availability to the mix to provide customers with integrated solutions spanning the entire data protection continuum. Fast-forward once more as we head into EMC World 2015 having combined our data protection and storage businesses under one umbrella (called “Core Technologies” which I now lead…no pressure) to deliver even more value to our customers through deeper product integration and simplification across our portfolio.What a difference three years make. Not just at EMC, but at every company. The pace of change has accelerated to lightning speed, and those that don’t move with it, risk the same fate as our dodo bird and dinosaur brethren. Obsolescence in this case is not an “if,” but a “when.”At the forefront of this disruption are the mega trends of big data, cloud, mobile, and social – with IT caught in the epicenter. Increasingly, companies find themselves living in two worlds: They are being asked to do more with less, leveraging their current IT infrastructure (which is typically on-premise and geared to handle traditional workloads), and at the same time, innovate for the future and drive new growth (think next-generation, app-centric workloads enabled by cloud). It’s a balancing act for sure, and by no means an easy feat.Which brings me to my number one mission this year, and the focus of my cameo in today’s general session at EMC World – to help our customers tackle this challenge and keep them moving forward.At the risk of stealing my own thunder on today’s main stage, the path forward can be broken down into three interrelated steps: 1) simplify and automate storage, 2) ensure a path to the cloud, and 3) protect data everywhere, regardless of where it lives. Achieving each of these successfully is predicated on having the right technology in place. Technology that helps you pave the way from ‘Point A’ to ‘Point B’ seamlessly, and ultimately, transform your business.This is why we are taking great pains to transform ours. Within Core Technologies specifically, we are continuing to drive transformation across our portfolio through integrated, software-enabled storage and data protection that delivers simple, scalable, and trusted infrastructure to fast-track your journey forward. While we are doing this a number of ways, for brevity’s sake, I’ll put it into the context of the steps described above.Simplify and automate storageRecently, I penned the blog ‘Looking at Storage through a Different Lens’ which likened EMC’s various storage platforms to what I consider to be their camera model equivalents. The main point I tried to get across is that there is no “one-size-fits-all” approach when it comes to either of these domains. It’s about picking the right solution for the job.  Since most companies compensate for this by having multiple storage systems, which can create storage silos and drive up cost and complexity, simplifying and automating storage becomes paramount. This can be attained by using software to centralize, optimize, and manage service-level objectives and data services across your environment. Two ways we help you achieve this:XtremIO – The industry’s leading all-flash array (AFA) with unprecedented performance and scale with inline “always-on” data services, XtremIO is the fastest-selling storage array in EMC history. It allows you to run traditional apps more efficiently and scale-out as needed to keep up with data growth, eliminate storage sprawl, and deploy next-generation workloads more quickly.VMAX3 – This is not your father’s VMAX. We’ve separated the data services from the back-end storage to enable you to move active, mission-critical data to high-performance storage tiers and inactive data to low-cost, high-capacity tiers. You can also take advantage of these features on alternative storage platforms and the cloud.By driving out cost and complexity with these and our other storage solutions, customers can redirect resources for new, future-focused initiatives.Plot a path to the cloudNo doubt, the cloud can be a double-edged sword – full of both opportunity (greater innovation and agility, along with lower costs) and risk (more complexity, etc.). This can make the journey there muddy at best. Enabling the cloud as an integrated component of your infrastructure offers a clear path forward – allowing you to leverage it on workloads where it is best suited. With EMC’s acquisitions of TwinStrata, Spanning, and Maginatics last year, we’ve made it easier for you to unlock the value of cloud where it makes sense for your business and to protect your data wherever it resides.Protect data everywhereThis brings me to my last point. Data itself can be transformational, but not if it isn’t protected.  Between massive data growth, data mobility, and ever-changing workloads, this can be a challenge. Taking a holistic view of data protection across all workloads – whether on-premise, in a hybrid cloud, or in a public cloud – will ensure your data is protected regardless of where it lives, where it may move, and against whatever might happen. And as I mentioned earlier, EMC is uniquely suited to help you address this challenge with cloud-enabled solutions that span the entire data protection continuum.So, can these three steps make you a pro tightrope walker overnight – maintaining an effortless balance between managing the IT challenges of today with transforming for tomorrow? Maybe not… but it can make your job and the journey there a lot less death-defying.last_img read more

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Making it Easier for Customers to Successfully Implement IoT

first_imgA lot of companies say they are focused on their customers, yet very few have a dedicated function specifically focused on the customer experience that advocates for customers and applies a customer lens to all areas of the business, from product development to go-to-market and from pricing and operations to post-sales service and support.Every day, Dell Technologies is making digital transformation real for our customers — addressing customer needs and success metrics at every point in their customer experience journey and by providing the broadest technology and solutions portfolio in the market. As part of the Chief Customer Office (CCO), my role is to ensure our customer’s voice and success metrics remains front and center in every decision we make. That’s why I couldn’t be more excited about today’s news that we are establishing a Dell Technologies IoT division.For our customers the time has never been better for IoT implementation and adoption. Harbor Research [1] estimates that by 2020, smart systems alone will create over 194 petabytes of data — that’s 64x the amount of data believed to be in the Library of Congress today. There’s a massive amount of data being generated and an equally giant opportunity for organizations to capitalize on the insights and opportunities this data can provide.It pays to do so. In Vodafone’s fifth annual IoT Barometer Report, 51 percent of adopters say IoT is increasing revenue or opening up new revenue streams. These capabilities paired with the cost of sensors rapidly approaching near zero, cloud, connectivity and a continuation of Moore’s Law is creating a ubiquitous opportunity for interoperability and insights that will fundamentally change the way we work, live and play.Beyond the power of our differentiated solutions portfolio, customers are looking to us to make it easier for them to usher in the digital future. As a customer solutions advocate, I often help our customers and sales teams successfully navigate big, complex IT landscapes so they can ultimately deliver business results. The Dell Technologies family of companies — Dell Inc., Dell EMC, Pivotal, RSA, SecureWorks, Virtustream and VMWare — is uniquely positioned to provide the end-to-end solutions our customers need. With the creation of our new IoT division, we’ve made it even simpler by giving customers one source/one stop to help them navigate and implement our edge-to-core-to-cloud portfolio as well as tailored end-to-end IOT solutions and services.At Dell Technologies, we believe our customers’ success is our success. We celebrate the progress many of our customers are making on their digital transformations and in our Annual Report for Customers.  In addition to simpler solutions that drive faster success and results, customers want to maximize their technology investments. We provide a number of enhanced benefits to enable our customers’ success and help them get the most out of their IoT implementations and investments. For example, Dell’s flexible consumption offering allows customers to turn their CapEx into OpEx as they usher in new technologies. In addition, customers of the new IoT division will have a single point of contact for support as well as access to strategic advisory services to help them lower time to results, reduce implementation risk and deliver results.Working within the CCO, I speak to, act and advocate on behalf of our customers to ensure we are providing the solutions they need and continually making it easier to do business with Dell. I’m looking forward to our customers’ response and their success with our new offerings — and the many more we can uniquely provide as Dell Technologies. Share your thoughts on what Dell can deliver next to help you usher in the digital future.[1] “Smart Systems Forecast Model” Harbor Research, Inc., 2015last_img read more

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Dell Precision 3240 Compact: An Ultra-Small But Powerful Workstation For All

first_img“Many of our resellers are reporting interest in high-powered systems with a small footprint. We’re seeing this even more as customers explore the provision of remote working opportunities or carefully spaced office layouts,” explains James Baulch, Dell Business Development Manager, PC Systems, Tech Data.  “Many customers in the industrial design and creative industries have been seeking to provide employees with access to small device with high graphics performance at home, so this could be a great solution, especially as it could be easily paired with existing displays and peripherals. The cost, size and specs are impressive – it seems small enough to ship out easily, but also powerful enough to run programs like Adobe Creative Cloud.”All this performance is packed into an ultra-small form factor with flexible mounting options, such as behind the monitor or the underside of the desktop, making it ideal for tight workspaces. Optional WiFi capabilities and a range of accessible ports, including front access USB 3.2, keep you connected to everything you need, while protective dust and cable covers make it great for space-constrained and challenging operating conditions often found in edge computing environments.The Dell Precision 3240 Compact is available now, globally, starting at $599 USD. For more information, click here. With some planning to return to the office over the coming months, many businesses and institutions are looking to reshape office layouts, striking a delicate balance that promotes both worker safety and productivity. Open office space will be a commodity, and those who continue to work remotely may also be seeking smaller devices that can be tucked away easily. Against this backdrop, today Dell introduced a new ultra-small form factor (USFF) workstation, the Dell Precision 3240 Compact.Small yet powerful, this system may only have the footprint of that hardback novel you were planning to read over the summer, but still delivers the power and performance to drive enterprise applications and up to seven 4k (60Hz) displays. It also provides the ability to run VR and AI simulations. The minimum footprint and affordable price of the Precision 3240 Compact is perfect for a wide range of users who seek to maximize space while maintaining power and performance in any setting – whether in a commercial studio, a university lab or even a home office.VR-Ready Workhorse with Space-Saving DesignDespite weighing less than 5lbs, the Dell Precision 3240 Compact is a powerful ISV-certified workstation and will be ready for VR, AR and AI, with an NVIDIA Quadro RTX™ 3000 professional graphics option available from October.Intensive computer tasks are easily handled thanks to 10th Gen Intel® Core™ or Xeon® processors and accelerated memory speeds of up to 2933MHz with capacities to expand up to 64GB (ECC memory is optional). And don’t worry about running out of storage for your projects as the Precision 3240 offers up to 4TB HDD/SDD (RAID optional). As with all Dell workstations, it also features Dell Optimizer for Precision, the only AI-based optimization software in the industry that automatically tunes your workstation performance using machine learning. The accessible price makes this a great, timely solution for students and teachers in graphic intensive fields engaging in self-directed and distant learning. Customers will also appreciate the versatility, performance and reliability of the Dell Precision 3240 Compact.Example customer use cases and workloads include:Engineers, designers and architects who require scalable machines for demanding workloads for creating intricate simulations and 2D/3D modeling on lightly threaded applicationsCreators rendering high-resolution graphics, editing high-resolution video or developing 3D animation for games, TV programs and AR/VR simulationsScientists and researchers working with large-scale simulations and complicated analysisFinancial analysts and traders iterating complex financial models and running multi-screen trading floors with computational analysisDoctors and healthcare providers who are running VR training, surgery planning or simulation content creation utilizing AR/VR headsetsRetail store and restaurant workers where digital signage is key in communicating graphics to multiple screens; security personnel may also use the device to power closed circuit TV (CCTV) operationsArtists and technicians in museums, galleries and educational spaces exhibiting VR/AR content or art to multiple platformslast_img read more

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Extradited teacher appears in Australia court on sex charges

first_imgMELBOURNE, Australia (AP) — A former teacher extradited from Israel after a six-year legal battle has appeared in an Australian court to face charges of sexually abusing several students at a Jewish school in Melbourne. Malka Leifer appeared in Melbourne Magistrates Court by video link from a police station where she is in COVID-19 quarantine. Wearing a headscarf, she sat with her head in her hands during the 20-minute hearing where the 74 charges against her were read in court for the first time. She did not respond when the judge asked if she could see and hear the proceedings. She previously has maintained her innocence against accusations of sexually abusing several former students at a Jewish school in Melbourne. She did not apply for bail.last_img read more

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For some Muslims, hope, uncertainty after travel ban lifted

first_imgPresident Joe Biden’s repeal of the Trump administration’s travel ban for several Muslim-majority nations brought a sigh of relief from those affected. But amid the celebrations are tales of dreams broken, families separated, savings used up and milestones missed, from births to graduations. There’s also uncertainty about the future: questions about backlogs, fees and travel restrictions due to the pandemic. Advocates for immigration and the rights of Muslims in the U.S. hail Biden’s decision, but also point to the work ahead to get lives back on track and roll back the ban’s legacy. Says one Yemeni man: “Making it to America is a big dream.”last_img read more

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Biden faces calls to secure release of US man in Afghanistan

first_imgWASHINGTON (AP) — Relatives and supporters of an American contractor who was abducted a year ago in Afghanistan and is believed to be in the custody of a Taliban-linked militant group are pressing the new Biden administration to bring him home. They also want to condition future peace talks or troop withdrawals on his release from captivity. Navy veteran Mark Frerichs vanished on Jan. 31, 2020. U.S. officials believe he is in the custody of the Haqqani network. The Taliban have not publicly acknowledged holding him. It’s unclear to what extent, if at all, Frerichs’ fate will be complicated by the declining American military presence in Afghanistan committed to by the Trump administration.last_img read more

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Fiji deports university leader in blow to regional relations

first_imgWELLINGTON, New Zealand (AP) — Fiji has deported the leader of the University of the South Pacific and his wife in a move that threatens to tear apart regional relationships. Vice-Chancellor Pal Ahluwalia says about 15 government agents surrounded their house at night and gave them minutes to pack before they were hastily deported to Australia. Ahluwalia says he’s been uncovering corruption at the university, but other administrators say there have been management lapses under his leadership. Fiji’s government has only cited violations of an immigration law that says foreigners cannot breach the peace and good government of Fiji. The University of the South Pacific is jointly owned by 12 countries and serves 28,000 students over a geographic area three times the size of Europe.last_img read more

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ND Physics professor participates in Hubble project

first_imgPhysics Professor Peter Garnavich is part of the largest Hubble telescope project undertaken to date, allowing him to examine distant galaxies and far-away supernovae.The telescope allows astronomers to gather data about galaxy evolution and cosmology as it can discern light that has traveled for billions of years across the universe.“This is a huge project by NASA to get the maximum information possible since the Hubble was repaired last May,” Garnavich said.He said the telescope  repairs improved the infrared camera on the Hubble telescope, giving it a larger viewing field as well as better camera quality. This allows the camera to see much further than it previously could.The project will look at more than 250,000 distant galaxies.Garnavich said the project will maximize time on the telescope by looking at the sky above the ecliptic poles, ensuring neither the sun nor the earth interferes or blocks the sky during the allotted time.The application for time on the Hubble telescope is very competitive, Garnavich said.“Only one in every 10 proposals are accepted,” he said.The more orbits a proposal requires, the less likely it is to be accepted, he said. Any project requiring more than 100 orbits is much less likely to be accepted.Even though the group requested 902 orbits, its proposal was approved because the project is a part of the Multi Cycle Treasury program, spreading the project over multiple years.The length of the project is also significant because it will look at pictures from the same spot in the earth’s orbit from year to year and compare differences.The team will look for several significant changes, including supernovae and the accretion of mass into the black holes at the center of galaxies.“With this project, we will be looking at the most distant supernovae and galaxies ever seen,” Garnavich said.last_img read more

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White House proposes compromise

first_imgThe White House proposed a new compromise Friday regarding religious nonprofits and the mandated contraceptive coverage, a deal that would potentially allow Notre Dame to issue a health insurance plan to its employees without directly providing birth control coverage. The proposal suggested a separate, individual private insurance policy that could provide contraceptive coverage at no cost for the employees of faith-based organizations. “These proposed rules aim to provide women with contraceptive coverage without cost sharing and to protect eligible organizations from having to contract, arrange, pay or refer for contraceptive coverage to which they object on religious grounds,” the proposal stated. The proposal is an amendment to rules regarding minimum insurance packages set forth by the Department of Health and Human Services as part of its regulatory authority under the Affordable Care Act (ACA). If the proposal takes effect, objecting organizations could provide employees with a plan that does not offer contraceptive coverage. The health insurer providing the plan would then enroll those employees in a separate, stand-alone policy that only covers contraceptives at no extra cost. The University, however, is self-insured. The policy proposed by the White House on Friday presented several possible approaches for self-insured organizations. In all approaches, self-insured plans could work with the company that administers their health benefits to avoid coverage contraceptives. A third-party administrator would “automatically arrange separate individual health insurance policies for contraceptive coverage from an issuer providing such policies,” the proposal stated. A previous proposal had suggested a similar solution for self-insured plans, but under that proposal, the third-party administrator would have had no way to pay for the contraceptive coverage other than the revenue it receives from self-insured plans. That proposal was criticized by many as nothing more than an accounting gimmick. The current proposal would lower fees in other parts of the ACA to provide third-party administrators with savings they could use to pay for the contraceptive coverage. The third-party administrator would receive a credit in an amount that would offset a reasonable charge by the third party administrator for performing this service. University Spokesman Dennis Brown declined comment on the proposal until Notre Dame administrators have fully analyzed its contents. Last May, the University filed one of more than 40 religious liberty lawsuits from faith-based organizations to contest the constitutionality of the contraception mandate. The lawsuit states the mandate would go against Church teachings and therefore violates the First Amendment, the Religious Freedom Restoration Act and other federal laws. A federal judge dismissed Notre Dame’s lawsuit last month, when U.S. District Court Judge Robert Miller Jr. ruled Jan. 2 that the lawsuit should be dismissed because the University’s claim is not yet “ripe,” meaning it is not ready to be litigated – in this case, because the rule regarding contraceptive coverage had not been finalized.last_img read more

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Alumni teach lacrosse in Honduras

first_imgAs the children of Nuestros Pequeños Hermanos Orphanage in Honduras first approached the pile of lacrosse sticks lying on their soccer field, they giggled and wondered at the foreignness of these strange items that resembled nothing they had seen before. But after a week of learning to play under the instruction of David Earl, former Notre Dame lacrosse player and current professional lacrosse player for the Minnesota Swarm, the children fell in love with the sport. Three Notre Dame graduates: John Arlotta, owner of the Minnesota Swarm, Dr. Peter Daly, an orthopedic surgeon for Summit Orthopedics and Earl began this program several years ago when Daly got involved with Nuestros Pequeños Hermanos and visited the Honduras location to find a glaring lack of available medical care. “[Their situation] got us thinking that they really need a surgical facility that the poor can access … So over the ensuing three to four years we got the money raised and got it built and started getting all of the equipment from the facilities around,” Daly said. “Now it’s been functioning well, and it actually just started functioning on a full-time basis.” Daly, however, felt the need to not only provide medical care but to also enrich the lives of the orphans in order to provide both a healthy and a happy living situation for them. “He does a lot of different things … to encourage the kids on an ongoing basis with the foundation, if you will, being his surgery center,” Arlotta said. “Then when he goes down there … he likes to have some additional things that he brings that is beyond just doing surgeries but helps in terms of the growth and education of the kids in this orphanage.” This principle of enrichment brought about the idea of exposing a new sport to the orphans that the children usually could not access, Daly said. “The kids down there principally play soccer and really don’t have the resources and the means to be involved in a sport that’s really equipment intensive,” he said. Daly provides medical care for the Swarm, and this connection inspired the plan, and Arlotta’s connection to Daly through Summit Orthopedics allowed Arlotta to make the concept a possibility. “It was primarily a funding mechanism from our standpoint. Once the idea came from Dr. Daly, we just jumped on and provided the funding for David and the equipment,” Arlotta said. When Arlotta and Daly approached Earl, he immediately latched onto this idea that combined his favorite sport and the service-based teachings of Notre Dame. “Any way to give back to these children and to give back to the center and the orphanage would be just a privilege for me … If I can go out there and bring a sport that I love to play and love to teach and put smiles on kids faces by teaching that, I think that’s just an unbelievable opportunity in itself,” Earl said. The children received the sport well, even though it differed greatly from the sports they usually played, Daly said. “They got to use a sport that necessitates a lot of hand-eye coordination, and mostly they can’t use their hands if they’re playing soccer, so that gives them another skill, and the kids loved it,” Daly said. “The children just had a great time throwing and scooping and passing.” Earl said his trip to Honduras went beyond just lacrosse. “What was interesting to me was that lacrosse was such a small part of being out there,” Earl said. “I was able to obviously teach lacrosse to the PE classes, but outside of that I was able to just kind of get to know the kids.” Current Notre Dame lacrosse coach Kevin Corrigan implemented similar efforts to combine the sport of lacrosse with the service teachings of Notre Dame in his program many years ago and continues to do so. “We really want to make it a really kind of a university, community thing that is initiated and built around the lacrosse idea, but it has much, much less to do with lacrosse than it does with our involvement with each other and the community,” Corrigan said. Earl’s and Arlotta’s work in bringing the sport to new places and to disadvantaged people fits in with the common attitude of a lacrosse player, Corrigan said. “Everybody feels like that’s kind of their charge as a lacrosse player is to spread the word and share the game,” he said. “That’s a little bit part of the culture of the sport and it’s a good thing.”last_img read more

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