BYD Introduces Tang EV600 With 828 kWh Battery

first_img Author Liberty Access TechnologiesPosted on November 25, 2018Categories Electric Vehicle News The pure electric Tang will be available in five and seven-seat (2+3+2) versions.Prices in China are to be around 260,000-360,000 RMB ($37,400-$51,800). The base price is twice higher than base conventional ICE and slightly higher than base PHEV version.We are very interested in how well the new Tang BEV will sell as the PHEV is the top -selling plug-in model for the brand (over 6,000 per month).BYD Tang EV600 specs:82.8 kWh batteryup to 600 km (373 miles), but real-world probably up to 400-500 km (250-310 miles) we assume0-100 km/h (62 mph) in 4.4 secondssystem output 360 kW, all-wheel drive (two 180 kW and 330 Nm electric motors – one per axle)fast charging in around 30 minutes BYD Tang EV600Source: BYD, Gasgoo In October 2018 BYD Set 5th Straight Plug-In Electric Car Sales Record BYD Yuan To Get EV500 Version With 500 KM Rangecenter_img Source: Electric Vehicle News BYD seems into big batteries now.One of the latest new models from BYD at 2018 Guangzhou Auto Show is the all-electric version of Tang SUV, which so far was available as conventional ICE and plug-in hybrid.The BYD Tang EV600 received a fairly decent 82.8 kWh battery and is expected to go up to 600 km (373 miles), but more realistically probably the maximum will be around 500 km (310 miles).Dual-motor all-wheel-drive powertrain (360 kW total) enables acceleration from 0 to 100 km/h (62 mph) in 4.4 seconds. Chinese manufacturer envisioned also 30-minute fast recharge.BYD news BYD To Introduce Tang BEV And Song MAX PHEV By End Of 2018last_img read more

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Bentley Joins Porsche Claims Battery Tech Not There Yet

first_img Cutaway Of Audi e-tron GT + Comparison With Porsche Taycan The company’s CEO has once again ruled out an electric sports car.Bentley is holding off producing its own all-electric car until battery technology improves, according to the British brand’s CEO Andrian Hallmark.More Porsche News Porsche Oddly Claims Today’s Battery Tech Not Ready For 911 Author Liberty Access TechnologiesPosted on December 5, 2018Categories Electric Vehicle News The company was expected to follow Volkswagen stablemate Porsche into the EV arena using the same platform and technology as Stuttgart’s upcoming Taycan. The Taycan will arrive next year, but Bentley’s first EV may be a little while longer while it waits for battery cell power density to get better.“The problem is when you get to our segment with the size of our vehicles and the frontal area we push through, current battery power density limits the size of the car you can offer with credible driving range,” Hallmark told Automotive News Europe.Hallmark is predicting that battery technology will reach a level suitable for Bentley’s application by 2023 or 2025“There is nothing industrialised in the supply chain before then,” he said.Bentley’s all-electric car, when it eventually does arrive, will be aimed at those that are rich, but don’t yet own a luxury car.“An electric vehicle is even more appealing to them than to our customers,” he said, adding that 40 percent of Bentley’s current customer base have expressed an interest in electric cars.Despite showing the all-electric EXP 12 Speed 6e sports car (pictured) at the Geneva motor show last year, Hallmark has said that Bentley’s first electric car won’t be a sports car because there are already enough in Volkswagen’s portfolio. The German company owns Bentley, as well as Porsche, Audi, Lamborghini, and Bugatti.“We have talked about sports cars in the past, but I don’t believe we need sports cars,” he said. “Within the Volkswagen Group [Bentley’s owner], there are enough sports cars,” he said.Hallmark wouldn’t reveal what kind of car the electric Bentley would be instead of a sports car, but did say it would ‘redefine grand touring’.“When we build an electric car it will be a Bentley first and foremost, and it will be an electric Bentley second,” he said.Whatever it turns out to be, it will be based on an Audi/Porsche platform, and it will bare some resemblance to the Taycan, at least mechanically. Source: Electric Vehicle News Porsche Will Increase Taycan Production Due To High Demandlast_img read more

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Huge Demand For Standard Tesla Model 3 Means Youll Have To Wait

first_imgSource: Electric Vehicle News $35,000 Tesla Model 3 Leading To Price Cuts On Chevy Bolt Demand for Tesla Model 3 grows again in the U.S. and delivery times increase.Checking out Tesla’s website recently revealed that Tesla Model 3 deliveries in the U.S. rose quickly from an estimated two-to-four week timeline to six-to-eight weeks. Please plan ahead, because we expect Tesla to increase this even further. As Tesla finally launched its $35,000 Standard Model 3 in the U.S., it escalated demand instantly. However, the automaker really had no way of knowing for sure the level of impact.Related Tesla Model 3 Content: Author Liberty Access TechnologiesPosted on March 11, 2019Categories Electric Vehicle News Now, after a bit of time has passed, it’s clear that Tesla can’t possibly produce as many cars as it needs to. Keep in mind that this is on top of manufacturing different variants of the car exclusively for Euro and Chinese markets. Unless Tesla reduces its output of Model 3 builds heading to global markets, there’s no way it can satisfy U.S. demand. Clearly, the new base Model 3 offering complicated this situation.Base Tesla Model 3 ($35,000) deliveries see a delay by some four weeks, it still appears at the time of this writing that the Model 3 Standard Plus ($37,000) stays at the two-to-four week delivery estimate. However, it’s becoming abundantly clear that Tesla may and will change anything on a dime.Recent DevelopmentsThe company openly shared its “good” announcements last week. Surprisingly, it included us in a private call and got informational emails out quickly. Last night, weirdly on a Sunday at 2 AM, it published this “news” quietly with no previous heads up and no email announcement. We at InsideEVs honestly think that Tesla needs to grow up a bit and stop this impulsive and unpredictable craziness if it wants mainstream media and the masses to take it seriously.If you still had hopes of reaching higher into the Model 3 product range, (Mid Range, Long Range, and AWD cars) Tesla could deliver those cars in just two weeks.With the latest announcement of a 3 percent price hike for these upper level variants, if you want one, you should get your order completed ASAP. Its clear interest is high for the Standard Model 3. However, at least in the U.S., interest in higher trim levels has diminished, at least to some degree.Do you still have a Tesla Model 3 reservation? Are you planning on buying one soon? We hope Tesla won’t raise prices on the Standard Model 3 anytime soon, or worse, eliminate it. If you have a pre-order in for the cheaper models, we’d suggest you move forward. Tesla Launches Base Model 3: Here’s The Price Four-Digit Number Of Tesla Model 3s Arrive In Europelast_img read more

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Emflux One electric motorcycle could be the next affordable electric sportbike at

first_imghttps://youtu.be/a80dwn_R-mcThe post Emflux One electric motorcycle could be the next affordable electric sportbike at $9,000 appeared first on Electrek. Emflux’s first electric motorcycle has been under development for the past two years. Now we’re getting a look at the prototype, which could become one of the next top contenders for affordable electric motorcycles. more…Subscribe to Electrek on YouTube for exclusive videos and subscribe the podcast. Source: Charge Forwardlast_img

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Ryobis 42inch Electric Zero Turn Riding Lawn Mower is 400 off plus

first_imgSource: Charge Forward Home Depot offers the Ryobi 42-inch 75Ah Electric Zero Turn Riding Lawn Mower for $3,499 shipped. That’s good for $400 off and the best offer we can currently find. This Ryobi riding mower reimagines your lawn cutting experience with a fully battery-powered design that can cut up to 2.25 acres on a single charge. Features include a 42-inch steel deck, 12-position adjustment, side or mulching discharge and it even has a USB port for charging your device. Rated 4.7/5 stars. More below. more…Subscribe to Electrek on YouTube for exclusive videos and subscribe to the podcast.https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2LVEtRE51hUThe post Ryobi’s 42-inch Electric Zero Turn Riding Lawn Mower is $400 off, plus more Green Deals from $99 appeared first on Electrek.last_img read more

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Apple tried to buy Tesla for more than its currently worth a

first_imgSource: Charge Forward Apple reportedly offered to buy Tesla at around $240 per share back in 2013.The bid from six years ago is now being reported as Tesla’s share price has dipped under the price Apple was allegedly willing to pay. more…Subscribe to Electrek on YouTube for exclusive videos and subscribe to the podcast.https://youtu.be/WdPfw3XWyJQThe post Apple tried to buy Tesla for more than it’s currently worth a few years ago, report says appeared first on Electrek.last_img

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Trescothicks early retirement a mixed blessing

first_imgSport Support The Guardian Marcus Trescothick’s retirement from international cricket at the weekend felt almost like a premature yet hardly unexpected bereavement, where relief mingles with sadness. The sadness is fundamentally selfish. We wanted more from an exhilaratingly aggressive batsman – almost England’s answer to Australia’s Matthew Hayden – especially at a time when the top order is in such disarray. The relief is that such a popular cricketer may at last find some peace from a decision that has been too long in the making.Both emotions jostled for primacy in the head of his friend and team-mate Keith Parsons last night, as he recalled the brilliant teenager who first made an impact with Somerset’s second XI. Parsons, 34, who first played for Somerset in 1992, two years before Trescothick, and has one year left on his contract, said: “Marcus’s decision didn’t come as any surprise to me. Deep down, he is a very proud man and I really think he wanted to give it another go with England. He felt up for it. It was only when he got to Dubai airport with the Somerset players the other day that he realised that he was still quite a way away from taking that step. Mon 24 Mar 2008 05.36 EDT … we have a small favour to ask. The Guardian will engage with the most critical issues of our time – from the escalating climate catastrophe to widespread inequality to the influence of big tech on our lives. At a time when factual information is a necessity, we believe that each of us, around the world, deserves access to accurate reporting with integrity at its heart.More people are reading and supporting The Guardian’s independent, investigative journalism than ever before. And unlike many news organisations, we have chosen an approach that allows us to keep our journalism accessible to all, regardless of where they live or what they can afford. But we need your ongoing support to keep working as we do.Our editorial independence means we set our own agenda and voice our own opinions. Guardian journalism is free from commercial and political bias and not influenced by billionaire owners or shareholders. This means we can give a voice to those less heard, explore where others turn away, and rigorously challenge those in power.We need your support to keep delivering quality journalism, to maintain our openness and to protect our precious independence. Every reader contribution, big or small, is so valuable. Support The Guardian from as little as $1 – and it only takes a minute. Thank you. Share on Facebook Read more Share on Pinterest Share on Twitter Share on LinkedIn Paul Weaver Share via Email Topics Share on Twitter Shares00 Since you’re here… Trescothick’s early retirement a mixed blessing England cricket team Cricket Share via Email First published on Mon 24 Mar 2008 05.36 EDT Share on Facebook Share on WhatsApp Sport “On Friday night he came home to Somerset and he came to my son Alex’s third birthday party. He was his old normal, relaxed self. I think his decision will be his and Somerset’s gain. Last year we had his services for the whole season for the first time for the best part of 10 years – and we had a great season and won promotion to the First Division.””I knew he was something really special when we played for the second team together against Hampshire. He was only 16 or 17 but his quality to hit the ball so powerfully was eye-catching.” It was a hundred he scored for Somerset against Glamorgan, coached by Duncan Fletcher, that really impressed the man who was about to become the England coach.Trescothick, 32, announced his retirement on Saturday after pulling out of Somerset’s 12-day pre-season trip to Dubai. The left-handed opener, who played in 76 Tests (5,825 runs, average 43.79, 14 hundreds) and 123 one-day internationals (4,335 at 37.37, 12 centuries) was often England’s most dominating batsman. But his international future was in doubt after he pulled out of England’s tour of India in March, 2006 with a stress-related illness and he returned from the Ashes tour of Australia the same year. Sign up to the Spin – our weekly cricket round-up England in New Zealand 2007-08 Share on Messenger Reuse this contentlast_img read more

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Big debate Has the Derby lost its No1 status on the calendar

first_imgHorse racing 5 Jun 2008 18:34 Email (optional) Reply Yes Bill OppenheimBloodstock consultant and co-owner of Derby chance Curtain CallThis remains a relevant question no matter who runs in the race. The Derby, at a mile and a half, is no longer the be-all and end-all of European racing. That is partly due to greater opportunities on the circuit and a lot of the reason for that is the way the bloodstock industry is structured.Racing is a losing proposition — it is very difficult to win with one roll of the dice — and so the breeding industry is more profitable than the racing side. The sport, as in society in general, is also more financially driven than it used to be. Money is no longer controlled by aristocrats but by entrepreneurs who want a chance to recover their investments at the earliest opportunity. Concurrently, there has been a move towards mile races in Europe as being the ones that produce the most valuable stud prospects. Take the two Coolmore horses, Giants Causeway and Rock of Gibraltar, both of whom were top-class milers who won races over a mile and a quarter. They would have been valued at €50m and €30m respectively when they went to stud. Galileo, who won the Derby, would have been valued at around €20m, which illustrates that even for the best potential staying sire there is a top limit. And Galileo is the ultimate success story — most Derby winners do not make overwhelmingly successful sires. There is no doubt that the miling division is more valuable as breeding stock than the mile-and-a-half division.For me, what is needed to restore the Derby is its inclusion in more of an integrated European racing programme to reflect that racing has become more international in the past 30 years. If you took a logical progression, you could create a Triple Crown of the French Derby, the Epsom Derby and the Irish Derby that the fans and gamblers would care about as much as the breeders. Tue 3 Jun 2008 19.01 EDT Share on Twitter | Pick recommendations How can 6/7 June be “too early” when the Flat Championship started at Doncaster on 22nd March and the Guineas meeting was 3/4 May?Is Royal Ascot late enough for you (it starts a whole 10 days after the Derby)?Epsom Downs have had sponsorship problems this year because the Vodafone contract was due to expire and they are in the process of rebuilding the main grandstand. Facebook Close report comment form Reply Twitter All … we have a small favour to ask. The Guardian will engage with the most critical issues of our time – from the escalating climate catastrophe to widespread inequality to the influence of big tech on our lives. At a time when factual information is a necessity, we believe that each of us, around the world, deserves access to accurate reporting with integrity at its heart.More people are reading and supporting The Guardian’s independent, investigative journalism than ever before. And unlike many news organisations, we have chosen an approach that allows us to keep our journalism accessible to all, regardless of where they live or what they can afford. But we need your ongoing support to keep working as we do.Our editorial independence means we set our own agenda and voice our own opinions. Guardian journalism is free from commercial and political bias and not influenced by billionaire owners or shareholders. This means we can give a voice to those less heard, explore where others turn away, and rigorously challenge those in power.We need your support to keep delivering quality journalism, to maintain our openness and to protect our precious independence. Every reader contribution, big or small, is so valuable. Support The Guardian from as little as $1 – and it only takes a minute. Thank you. unthreaded 0 1 newest Sign in or create your Guardian account to recommend a comment The Derby The three biggest races in Europe are the Derby, King George, and the Arc. All over 12 furlongs. The rise of the 8-10 furlong breeding obsession has taken some of the kudos from the Derby as the ultimate test, definitely, but it is up to the racing establishment to re-assert the importance of the Derby, through prize money and not letting its place in the pattern be diminished.What has also damaged the race is a period of below-par winners, and arguably the Breeder’s Cup, which has switched a lot of focus to late season training.Looking at the point above, if 12 furlongs is to ‘stay and stay’ things have reached a strange pass. racingman Share via Email Read more Share on LinkedIn 15244 Horse racing | Pick View more comments Please select Personal abuse Off topic Legal issue Trolling Hate speech Offensive/Threatening language Copyright Spam Other Report Twitter comments (5)Sign in or create your Guardian account to join the discussion. Facebook 25 Share on Twitter Share Twitter Sportblog Share on Facebook expanded | Pick Reply Facebook Show 25 Share Share via Email Share on Facebook Share Since you’re here… Support The Guardian Msay Share on Facebook Reply Report 50center_img The difficulty in attracting sponsorship suggests that the whole of horse racing does not have the cachet socially that it once did. And yet, racing demographics should be very good; certainly to owners in America, you would be advertising Cadillacs. Part of the answer has to be that the industry must present a far better product for everybody, through a radical restructuring of prize money and a more international view to the calendar.For the owners of Curtain Call, though, the Derby is still the biggest race in the world. We’re all professionals in the industry, and people like us aren’t supposed to have the second favourite for the Derby. But there’s no reason why we shouldn’t win it, the horse has the pedigree and we would be kidding to say it is not a huge race to win.NoMarcus TregoningTrainer of 2006 Derby winner Sir PercyWhat is so special about Epsom is that it is a unique racecourse — there is no other, you would have to say, that quite comes close to it. That is why we are so lucky in this country: none of our racecourses are the same, they all have their quirks and their challenges and that is what gives the big races their character. You would certainly say that is true of Epsom. It is the most testing track for any horse in the world and you will find that generally the best horse of its generation wins the Derby.I cannot imagine that any trainer or owner would not like to win the Derby or, indeed, has not dreamt of doing so at some point. You cannot underestimate what it means to win such a prize and that has not dimmed over time. Huge prestige accompanies victory — more so than any other race. Having won it with Sir Percy, I certainly want to do so again. I do not know what the circumstances were in which some trainers initially said that they were not looking to run their horse in this year’s race. What I do know is that there are many considerations to be taken into account and that everyone has their own ideas. For example, there has been a lot of rain and the going for Saturday’s race may well be on the soft side if it doesn’t dry out over the next few days. That will inevitably have an eff ect — certain horses suit certain ground more than others. You can be sure, however, that a really good horse will come out on top, especially now that New Approach has entered and is in the frame, and it will be a proper championship race.When considering whether winning the Derby influences future stallion valuations, admittedly you cannot ignore that the emphasis is now onbreeding horses for speed rather than stamina. But there are still studs, including the famous Ballymacoll Stud, who breed for stamina and a horse that can go on to win the Derby.And winning the race does prove the horse’s quality. Sir Percy won races over a mile and a mile and a half but he proved himself a champion when he won the Derby and that is why he had a block of mares queuing up for him.And you have to look at Galileo too, the 2001 champion, who has been doing extremely well at stud. For most owners and trainers in this country, the Derby is the race to win.The race is far from dwindling in popularity and has actually increased its relevance to the public in recent years. There are far more people who go to the Derby now than there were 10 years ago. It should attract a top-class permanent sponsor, they just haven’t quite found the right one yet. It is an important choice because there is a lot of money involved; it is a massive prize and so it should be for a race of such significance. Share on Facebook Threads collapsed Order by oldest 0 1 Sorry there was an error. Please try again later. If the problem persists, please contact Userhelp Reuse this content,View all comments > Share on Twitter 5 Jun 2008 18:37 The Recap: sign up for the best of the Guardian’s sport coverage Report fetlocks 0 1 5 Jun 2008 0:35 Loading comments… Trouble loading? I think Bolger’s decision simply strengthens the Derby’s position as a pre-eminent race. OK, so the world is changing and speed is becoming more important than stamina – but try telling that to the hundred thousand people who will throng to the downs on Friday and Saturday.The Derby is iconic. It’s like the FA cup final, Wimbledon and the Open Golf. So what if the big boys didn’t get to the FA Cup Final this year – if they HAD qualified their layers fans and managers would have been proud to step onto the pitch at Wembley.The team at Epsom seem to be doing a stalwart job in difficult circumstances. Once again their marketing was top class. And – belatedely – so is the field. Sportblog No, no. I’m sorry it’s impossible to see the Epsom Derby as still being the “world’s greatest horse race.””iconic” – really? Sorry you are living in the past.It is run too early in the flat racing year, and over a course that is more of an eccentric fairground rollercoaster ride attraction than a fair test of immature horses.And except as national hunt stallions, who wants horses these days who stay and stay?The diificulty in finding a new sponsor for this race says it all. Big debate: Has the Derby lost its No1 status on the calendar? An age restricted race, by definition, cannot be the best of anything. Is the under 23 Olympics the best football competition?Rock of Gibraltar did not win, or race, at a mile and quarter. Share on WhatsApp 4 Jun 2008 20:48 Report Share on Facebook Share on Messenger collapsed | Pick 0 1 Share on Twitter Reason (optional) Facebook Share on Facebook Share on Pinterest Reply | Pick Topics Facebook 100 Comments 5 windbag Share Share on Twitter Report Twitter Shares00 Share on Twitter Report Twitter Share on Twitter Share on Facebook First published on Tue 3 Jun 2008 19.01 EDT Share 4 Jun 2008 7:34 0 1 oldestlast_img read more

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Other Reasons Why Avon Got The License

first_imgForeign Corrupt Practices Act enforcement actions are often simplistic regarding the reasons why a company obtained or retained the business at issue in the enforcement action.The DOJ and/or SEC allege of course that it was because of the alleged improper payments and often ignore other valid and legitimate reasons why the company at issue obtained or retained business.Indeed, the vast majority of FCPA enforcement actions are against business organizations that are otherwise viewed as industry leaders who sell the best products or offer the best services for the best prices.With such companies can it truly be said that but for the alleged improper payments the company would not have obtained or retained the business?This general topic has been explored numerous times on these pages (see here, here, here, and here). Call it the causation gap in most FCPA enforcement actions.As previously highlighted, the lack of causation between an alleged improper payment and any alleged business obtained or retained is not a legal defense because the FCPA’s anti-bribery provisions prohibit the offer, payment, promise to pay or authorization of the payment of any money or thing of value.  Indeed, several FCPA enforcement actions have alleged unsuccessful bribery attempts in which no business was actually obtained or retained.Nevertheless, causation should be relevant when calculating FCPA settlement amounts, specifically disgorgement which is often the most prominent component of an SEC FCPA settlement.  However, the prevailing FCPA enforcement theory often seems to be that because Company A made improper payments to allegedly obtain or retain X, then all of Company A’s net profits associated with X are subject to disgorgement.Consider the December 2014 FCPA enforcement action against Avon.  At $135 million, it was the third-largest FCPA enforcement action of all-time against a U.S. company.At its core, the enforcement action alleged that various things of value were provided to Chinese officials to induce the officials to award Avon a national direct selling license. The enforcement action alleged that Avon received the license because Chinese officials were provided things of value such as wallets, designer bags, watches, meals, and travel benefits.In other words, the allegations are simplistic – but for Chinese officials receiving the above things of value, Avon would not have received the license.However, this ignores other valid and legitimate reasons why Avon got the license.  Indeed, as highlighted in this post for years the U.S. government was encouraging the Chinese government to award direct selling licenses to U.S. companies pursuant to China’s commitment to do so by virtue of its World Trade Organization membership.Set forth below are relevant excerpts from United States Trade Representative documents during the same time period at issue in the Avon enforcement action.2004 REPORT TO CONGRESS ON CHINA’S WTO COMPLIANCE“China is scheduled to implement its distribution services commitments by December 11 of this year and thereby allow foreign enterprises to freely distribute goods within China. While China has issued regulations that call for timely implementation of these commitments, China has not made clear the precise means by which foreign enterprises will actually be able to apply for approval to provide any of the various types of distribution services. In addition, China has not yet fulfilled its commitment to open its market for sales away from a fixed location, or direct selling, by December 11, 2004, as none of the measures necessary to allow foreign participants have been issued. The Administration will pay particular attention to these areas over the coming months to ensure that China fully meets these important WTO commitments.[…]In its accession agreement, China committed to eliminate national treatment and market access restrictions on foreign enterprises providing these services through a local presence within three years of China’s accession (or by December 11, 2004), subject to limited product exceptions.[…]China committed to lift market access and national treatment restrictions in the area of sales away from a fixed location, or direct selling, by December 11, 2004. China did not agree to any liberalization before that date. China first permitted direct selling in 1990, and numerous domestic and foreign enterprises soon began to engage in this business. In the ensuing years, however, serious economic and social problems arose, as so-called “pyramid schemes” and other fraudulent or harmful practices proliferated. China outlawed direct selling in 1998, although some large U.S. and other foreign direct selling companies continued to operate in China after altering their business models. Throughout 2004, MOFCOM has been drafting three measures to implement China’s direct selling commitment, the Measures for the Administration of Direct Marketing, the Measures for the Administration of Sales Personnel Training and the Regulations on the Prevention of Anti-Pyramid Sales Scams. Despite U.S. requests and the December 11 deadline for China to implement its direct selling commitment, MOFCOM has not made drafts of these measures available for public comment. To date, it has only discussed them in a November 2004 meeting with selected enterprises.Based on the November 2004 meeting and subsequent bilateral engagement by the United States, it appears that the draft direct selling measures may contain several problematic provisions. For example, one provision raises serious national treatment concerns, as it apparently allows direct selling of domestically produced goods, but requires imported goods to be sold at a fixed location. Other provisions, meanwhile, impose operating requirements that seem designed to make direct selling commercially unviable. The United States has urged MOFCOM to reconsider these provisions. Through the end of 2004 and into 2005, as necessary, the United States will work closely with U.S. companies in an effort to ensure that China develops and implements direct selling measures that facilitate legitimate commerce and are WTO-consistent.” 2005 REPORT TO CONGRESS ON CHINA’S WTO COMPLIANCE“China only issued the regulations implementing its commitment to open its market for sales away from a fixed location, also known as “direct selling”, in September 2005, and these regulations contain several problematic provisions that the United States has urged China to reconsider. The Administration will continue to pursue these important issues in 2006 to ensure that China fully meets its commitments.[…]Meanwhile, MOFCOM’s ninemonth delay in issuing regulations on sales away from a fixed location, or direct selling, postponed the start-up of direct selling activities by foreign enterprises. A similar delay affected the wholesaling and retailing of pharmaceuticals. These delays have been disappointing, given the fundamentally important nature of China’s distribution services commitments and the repeated assurances by senior-level Chinese government officials that China would implement these commitments on time. In 2006, the United States will closely monitor how MOFCOM and relevant provincial and local authorities exercise their approval authority. In particular, the United States will work to ensure that the approval systems operate expeditiously, in a non-discriminatory manner and without creating any new trade barriers.[…]Sales away from a fixed location China first permitted direct selling in 1990, and numerous domestic and foreign enterprises soon began to engage in this business. In the ensuing years, however, serious economic and social problems arose, as so-called “pyramid schemes” and other fraudulent or harmful practices proliferated. China outlawed direct selling in 1998, although some direct selling companies were permitted to continue operating in China after altering their business models. In its WTO accession agreement, China committed to lift market access and national treatment restrictions in the area of sales away from a fixed location, or direct selling, by December 11, 2004. China did not agree to any liberalization before that date. As early as 2002, MOFCOM and SAIC began drafting measures to implement China’s direct selling commitment. Despite U.S. requests and the December 11, 2004 deadline for China to implement its direct selling commitment, the Chinese authorities did not make any drafts of these measures publicly available, instead only providing unofficial drafts to select direct selling enterprises. The Chinese authorities subsequently issued final versions of these measures – the Measures for the Administration of Direct Selling and the Regulations on the Administration of AntiPyramid Sales Scams – in September 2005, nine months late. The final versions of the direct selling measures made some improvements to provisions apparently included in the earlier drafts. Nevertheless, these measures still contain several problematic provisions. For example, one provision would outlaw practices allowed in every country in which the U.S. industry operates – reportedly 170 countries in all – by refusing to allow direct selling enterprises to pay compensation based on team sales, where upstream personnel are compensated based on downstream sales. The United States has pointed out that China could revise this provision to permit team-based compensation while still addressing its legitimate concerns about pyramid schemes. Other problematic provisions include a three-year experience requirement that only applies to foreign enterprises, not domestic ones, restrictions on the cross-border supply of direct selling services and high capital requirements that may limit smaller direct sellers’ access to the market. The United States has urged the Chinese authorities to reconsider the problematic provisions in the direct selling measures, both bilaterally and during the transitional review before the Council for Trade in Services, held in September 2005. MOFCOM has since offered to meet with U.S. and other foreign industry representatives to hear their concerns. This meeting is expected to take place in January 2006. The United States will work closely with U.S. companies in urging China to revise its direct selling measures to facilitate legitimate commerce and to comply with its WTO commitments.”2006 REPORT TO CONGRESS ON CHINA’S WTO COMPLIANCE“Another key area involves China’s commitment to open its market for sales away from a fixed location, also known as “direct selling.” Initially delayed, China’s implementation of this commitment has since proceeded slowly and has subjected foreign direct sellers to unwarranted restrictions on their business operations. The United States will continue to pursue these important issues in 2007 to ensure that China fully meets its commitments and will take further appropriate actions seeking the revision or elimination of problematic policies, including through WTO dispute settlement, where appropriate.”[…]China first permitted direct selling in 1990, and numerous domestic and foreign enterprises soon began to engage in this business. In the ensuing years, however, serious economic and social problems arose, as so-called “pyramid schemes” and other fraudulent or harmful practices proliferated. China outlawed direct selling in 1998, although some direct selling companies were permitted to continue operating in China after altering their business models.In its WTO accession agreement, China committed to lift market access and national treatment restrictions in the area of sales away from a fixed location, or direct selling, by December 11, 2004. China did not agree to any liberalization before that date.As early as 2002, MOFCOM and SAIC began drafting regulations to implement China’s direct selling commitment. Despite U.S. requests and the December 11, 2004 deadline for China to implement its direct selling commitment, the Chinese authorities did not make any drafts of these measures publicly available, instead only providing unofficial drafts to select direct selling enterprises. The Chinese authorities subsequently issued final versions of these measures – the Measures for the Administration of Direct Selling and the Regulations on the Administration of Anti-Pyramid Sales Scams – in August 2005, nine months late. In September 2006, after releasing a draft for public comment, MOFCOM issued the Administrative Measures on the Establishment of Service Network Points for the Direct Sales Industry, which clarified some aspects of the earlier measures.The final versions of the August 2005 direct selling measures made some improvements to provisions apparently included in the earlier drafts, but they also contained several problematic provisions. For example, one provision essentially outlaws multi-level marketing practices allowed in every country in which the U.S. industry operates – reportedly 170 countries in all – by refusing to allow direct selling enterprises to pay compensation based on team sales, where upstream personnel are compensated based on downstream sales. The United States has pointed out that China could revise this provision to permit team-based compensation while still addressing its legitimate concerns about pyramid schemes. Other problematic provisions include a three-year experience requirement that only applies to foreign enterprises, not domestic ones, a cap on single-level compensation, restrictions on the cross-border supply of direct selling services and high capital requirements that may limit smaller direct sellers’ access to the market. The new service center regulations also include vague requirements that could prove excessively burdensome for small and medium-sized direct sellers.Working closely with U.S. industry, the United States immediately began urging the Chinese authorities to reconsider the problematic provisions in the direct selling measures, both bilaterally and during the transitional review before the Council for Trade in Services, held in September 2005. After the direct selling measures went into effect in December 2005, moreover, many companies began to apply for direct selling licenses but were confused by the opaque license review process. Despite MOFCOM’s regulatory requirement that direct selling licenses be reviewed within ninety days, many foreign and domestic companies have waited for many months for MOFCOM and SAIC to review their license applications. Accordingly, the United States urged China to address the slow pace and lack of transparency in the licensing process, along with the problematic restrictions in the direct selling measures, during the run-up to the April 2006 JCCT meeting. In response, MOFCOM agreed to hold an informal dialogue with U.S. and other foreign industry representatives in the following months to better understand their concerns about the direct selling measures and to facilitate their efforts to navigate the application and approval process for obtaining licenses. Since then, five U.S. companies had obtained licenses (as of early December 2006), and MOFCOM generally remained slow in processing a growing number of license applications from foreign and domestic companies. The United States, meanwhile, has continued to urge China to revise its direct selling measures and to process direct selling applications in a timely and transparent manner in order to facilitate legitimate commerce and to comply with its WTO commitments, both in bilateral meetings and at the November 2006 transitional review before the Council for Trade in Services. The United States will continue these efforts in 2007.”last_img read more

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Permanent Ban on Pot Farms Approved by Chelan County CommissionersLawmakers Look at

first_imgWhat was a moratorium on pot farms in Chelan County is now a permanent ban. Commissioners took the action following a public hearing in Wenatchee Tuesday. The action is prompted by complaints from neighbors who claim the farms are a nuisance that create foul odors and blinding lights. That’s the issue in Plain where a State-licensed pot farm has angered local town folk including George Wilson . . Audio Playerhttps://kpq.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/02/020916-PotBan-5.mp300:0000:0000:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume.25 people testified from both sides at Tuesday’s public hearing on the proposed ban. Growers say they are willing to work with the County in finding suitable grow sites and Commissioner Keith Goehner says the ban could be lifted after new regulations are adopted . . Audio Playerhttps://kpq.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/02/020916-PotBan-6.mp300:0000:0000:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume.Commissioners will now form a working group to draft new regulations before considering lifting the ban at the end of this year. Officials with the State Liquor and Cannibus Control Board say they will continue to issue licenses to qualified growers and processors in spite of the ban.last_img read more

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New research supports need for a radical cure strategy to tackle debilitating

first_imgJul 26 2018A team of malaria experts from a large international research collaboration has published results supporting the need for a radical cure strategy to tackle one of the most debilitating forms of malaria caused by the Plasmodium vivax parasite.Vivax malaria affects more than 13 million people each year, with an estimated 40% of the world’s population at risk of contracting the infection across all continents from South America to South-East Asia. In some regions P. vivax has become resistant to standard treatment with chloroquine. The problem is compounded by vivax’s ability to lie dormant in the liver for long periods of time before causing recurrent infections that have an enduring impact on people’s lives and livelihoods.Related StoriesScientists identify malaria’s Achilles’ heelResearchers discover new neurotoxin that selectively targets mosquitoesStudy shows how the mosquito immune system combats malaria parasitesLed by a team at Menzies School of Health Research in Australia, the study has assembled individual patient data from clinical trials conducted since 2000, investigating the effect of chloroquine dosing, combined with the partner drug primaquine, and the risk of recurrent malaria across different settings. The study published today in the international journal The Lancet Infectious Diseases is the result of a collaboration between more than 50 international researchers under the auspices of the Worldwide Antimalarial Resistance Network (WWARN).”Our findings highlight the substantial benefit of a modest increase in the dose of chloroquine in children aged under 5 years and the importance of combining primaquine with chloroquine to have a better chance of curing patients.” explains Dr Rob Commons, PhD student at the Menzies School of Health Research and part of the WWARN Clinical Group.”This analysis of more than 5,000 patients from 37 studies, across 17 countries, is the largest individual patient data meta-analysis of P. vivax clinical trials to date. Our results show chloroquine is currently given in lower doses than recommended, with as many as 35% of patients in trials given less than the WHO recommended 25 mg/kg. We also know from our analysis that these patients are more likely to fail treatment” confirms  Dr Commons”The study highlights the need for clinicians in affected areas to provide radical cure to kill the blood and liver stage of the vivax parasite and ensure patients can recover quickly. We also want to prevent transmission of the parasite to other people and reduce the global burden of this disease” adds  Professor Ric Price, Head of the Clinical Group at the Worldwide Antimalarial Resistance Network (WWARN).”This research team has highlighted some important potential adjustments are needed to ensure all patients, especially small children, are given the best chance of recovery from vivax malaria.” concludes Prof Kevin Baird, Head of the Eijkman-Oxford Clinical Research Unit (EOCRU) in Jakarta, Indonesia. Source:https://www.menzies.edu.au/icms_docs/290651_New_evidence_supports_radical_treatment_of_widespread_form_of_malaria.pdflast_img read more

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Monash researchers identify new mechanism used by Henipaviruses in infection

first_imgAug 3 2018Henipaviruses are among the deadliest viruses known to man and have no effective treatments. The viruses include Hendra, lethal to humans and horses, and the Nipah virus, a serious threat in East and Southeast Asia. They are on the World Health Organization Blueprint list of priority diseases needing urgent research and development action.Now Monash University’s Biomedicine Discovery Institute (BDI) researchers have identified a new mechanism used by Henipaviruses in infection, and potential new targets for antivirals to treat them. Their findings may also apply to other dangerous viruses.The research was published today in Nature Communications.A collaboration of scientists, led by Monash BDI’s Dr Gregory Moseley, found that Henipaviruses hijack a mechanism used by cells to counter DNA damage and prevent harmful mutations, important in diseases such as cancer.Dr Moseley said it was already known that the viruses send a particular protein into a key part of a cell’s nucleus called the nucleolus, but it wasn’t known why it did this.He said the researchers showed that this protein interacted with a cell protein that is an important part of the DNA-damage response machinery, called ‘Treacle’. This inhibited Treacle function, which appears to enhance henipavirus production.(Treacle is, incidentally, involved in a craniofacial disorder called Treacher Collins syndrome, aired in the popular US movie Wonder in 2017.)”What the virus seems to be doing is imitating part of the DNA damage response,” Dr Moseley said.”It is using a mechanism your cells have to protect you against things like aging and mutations that lead to cancer. This appears to make the cell a better place for the virus to prosper,” he said.Related StoriesSugary drinks linked to cancer finds studyAdding immunotherapy after initial treatment improves survival in metastatic NSCLC patientsTrends in colonoscopy rates not aligned with increase in early onset colorectal cancerAccording to Dr Moseley, it is possible that blocking the virus from doing this may lead to the development of new anti-viral therapies.Both Hendra and Nipah, which spread from bats to other animals and humans, emerged in the 1990s; Hendra in an outbreak in Brisbane in 1994 and Nipah in Malaysia in 1998. The viruses, which share outcomes including inflammation of the brain and severe respiratory symptoms, have since caused multiple outbreaks of disease. Nipah has killed several hundred people, including at least 17 people in the Indian state of Kerala in June.”Nipah is not so important in Australia but it’s the one people are concerned about internationally,” Dr Moseley said.”Like Ebola, if you get a really big outbreak and it’s not containable, it could be disastrous,” he said.He said the study’s findings add insights into how viruses behave more generally.”We identified a new way that viruses change the cell, by using the very same machinery that the cell normally uses to protect itself from diseases like cancer,” he said.”This seems to be heading towards exciting possibilities about what viruses might be doing,” joint first author, Dr Stephen Rawlinson said.”We are now trying to work out exactly how changing the DNA damage response through Treacle is useful to this and other dangerous viruses,” he said. Source:https://www.monash.edu/last_img read more

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Unwitting humans assist lizard invasions across the Caribbean

first_imgFor centuries, Caribbean anole lizards have been homebodies. Species have tended to stick to the islands where they evolved, because sailing across the vast distances of ocean separating them isn’t exactly easy for most land dwellers. As a result, geographically isolated islands tend to have fewer species overall, whereas less isolated islands usually boast more. But now scientists think this accepted ecological wisdom may need to be revised, and it’s all humans’ fault. When researchers studied the present-day distribution of anole lizard species across the Caribbean, they found that an island’s geographic isolation no longer necessarily corresponded to fewer species. Instead, it was all about its economic isolation within the global trade network. That’s because, like many species, anole lizards have started hitching rides on cargo ships, making it much easier for them to reach far-flung islands. The more trade an island participates in, the more species diversity it tends to have, no matter its geographic location, the team reports online today in Nature. The flip side is that economic isolation might protect native lizard species from newly imported competitors. Cuba, for example, would rapidly gain 1.65 lizard species if the United States lifted its trade embargo, the researchers predict.last_img read more

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Mysterious sea star killer probably a virus

first_imgScientists have identified the likely culprit in a disease that has devastated sea stars along the west coast of North America. Genomic detective work and lab experiments show that the wasting disorder is associated with a previously unknown virus. With the discovery comes a deeper mystery, however. The sea star–killing virus is far from new. The authors of the study found it in museum samples up to 72 years old, so scientists are puzzled about why the current outbreak has been so severe.”This is probably the most extensive and devastating disease of marine invertebrates that has happened,” says ecologist Bruce Menge of Oregon State University, Corvallis, who was not involved in the new research. “It’s a major concern.”The enigmatic disease came to broad attention in June 2013, when recreational divers near Vancouver, British Columbia, and Seattle, Washington, began noticing legions of dying sea stars. The sea stars first developed lesions, then began to lose their arms, and finally decayed into piles of skeletal ossicles (bits of calcium carbonate such as a star’s plates and spines). As the year progressed, the disease was seen in more and more locations in the waters off California. Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! 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Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Although there have been minor outbreaks in previous decades, this one is much more widespread, and more than 20 species of sea stars have been afflicted; other kinds of echinoderms, the animal group to which sea stars and sea urchins belong, have not. Researchers have raced to collect samples and conduct laboratory experiments to investigate any pathogens that might be involved. A feature in Science earlier this year, now available for free, examined the mystery. Scientists sent hundreds of tissue samples to Ian Hewson, a microbial oceanographer at Cornell University. When he sequenced the DNA in the samples, he discovered that a densovirus was more common in the sick stars than in ones that looked healthy. (Densoviruses are known to infect insects, crustaceans, and some sea urchins.) Additional evidence came from experiments conducted by marine ecologist Drew Harvell of Cornell and other researchers, who took tissue from sick sea stars, filtered out everything larger than viruses, and injected the tissue into apparently healthy sea stars. They developed symptoms—and, concurrently, the amount of densovirus in their bodies increased. Other sea stars injected with sterilized tissue did not develop symptoms of the wasting disorder.“We have very good evidence that this is a densovirus,” Hewson says. But because the virus cannot be grown in culture, scientists cannot satisfy the classic tests for identifying the culprit of a disease: four criteria collectively referred to as Koch’s postulates. The researchers published their results online today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.Looking for some historical perspective, Hewson tested museum samples of sea stars collected between 1923 and 2010 along the U.S. west coast. The virus existed in healthy looking specimens from five different years, suggesting it has persisted in the environment. Hewson speculates that the virus may have mutated as it wiped out various species of sea stars, allowing it to infect others. He is also trying to figure out the source of the virus, by analyzing sea stars from around the world, and whether it can infect other kinds of echinoderms. The biggest question is why the current epidemic has been so bad. A likely situation, Hewson and his colleagues say, is that an overabundance of sea stars increased the transmission of the virus, especially if they were stressed by competition for food, which could make them more vulnerable to infection.That theory makes sense to marine pathologist Marta Gomez-Chiarri of the University of Rhode Island, Kingston, who was not involved in the new paper. She and her students have been studying an earlier densovirus outbreak on the east coast; populations of sea stars in Rhode Island’s Narragansett Bay abounded before a crash in 2011. It’s not clear whether the same densovirus that caused the west coast die-off is also involved in the eastern declines. Hewson found some densovirus genes in sea stars from Connecticut but did not have enough samples for firm conclusions.Menge doesn’t think overabundance played a role in the current outbreak among 13 sea star populations that he follows on the coast of Oregon. Instead, he wonders whether ocean acidification, which may also be a source of stress that weakens sea stars, is a possible contributing factor. So far, the evidence is mixed for the role of acidification, Menge admits.Whatever the cause of the epidemic, Menge says, the demise of purple stars has already led to greater survival of its prey, including barnacles and mussels. As a result, he predicts, the mussels will eventually take over the rocky shore, crowding out many other species of invertebrates. In a way, he adds, the epidemic is a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity for ecologists to study these predator-prey relationships. But that doesn’t dull the pain of losing familiar and charismatic species. “From a personal standpoint, it’s really disheartening.”last_img read more

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House spending panel calls for cuts at NASA NOAA and NIST small

first_img Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) The National Science Foundation (NSF) would get a small increase, and NASA’s science programs would see a tiny cut, under a draft 2016 appropriations bill released today by a U.S. House of Representatives spending panel. But it would boost funding for NASA’s planetary science missions above the White House’s request.The bill, released by the House commerce, justice, and science (CJS) appropriations subcommittee, also proposes cuts to science programs at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and a cut in the overall budget of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).The panel is scheduled to vote on the bill Thursday. The subcommittee “markup” is the first step toward revising and sending the bill, which provides funding for the 2016 fiscal year that begins 1 October, to the full House. Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Emailcenter_img Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Overall, the measure calls for providing $51.4 billion to the departments of Commerce and Justice, NSF, NASA, NIST and related agencies. That is $1.3 billion more than current spending for these programs, notes a subcommittee press release, but $661 million below the president’s request. The bill and release provide primarily top-line numbers; more detail will be provided in a committee report that will be publicly released once the bill is sent to the full appropriations panel.Here are a few details, by agency:National Science Foundation: NSF’s budget would grow by only $50 million—a tiny 0.7% increase over the current $7.345 billion. Not only would that be $329 million below the president’s request, but it’s also $200 million below the level authorized by the controversial America COMPETES Act that is expected to come before the full House of Representatives for a vote next week.At the same time, some NSF activities are likely to be squeezed more than others. The subcommittee’s chair, Representative John Culberson (R–TX), has long been a big supporter of NSF’s education programs, although his bill is unlikely to be as generous as the $96 million boost requested by the Obama administration. And any increase for education could well come at the expense of NSF’s research directorates. NSF supporters will be watching closely to see if the subcommittee has sided with the House science committee in making severe cuts to research in the geosciences and the social and behavioral sciences. A requested 9% boost in operations, much of it to prepare for NSF’s pending move from Ballston to Alexandria, Virginia, is also vulnerable under a flat budget.NASA: The subcommittee requests $18.529 billion overall for NASA, a $519 million increase over current levels, matching the president’s request. NASA’s science programs would see a $7 million cut, to roughly $5.2 billion; the White House had requested a $44 million increase. But the bill includes “funding above the President’s request for planetary science,” including $140 million for a mission to Europa, a moon of Jupiter and a favorite project of Culberson’s. The White House had requested just $30 million for the Europa mission, which the bill says should launch by 2022. The subcommittee does not say which science programs may see cuts to pay for the planetary science funding.NIST: NIST would get $855 million, $9 million below current levels and far below the White House request for a 29% increase to $1.12 billion. “[I]mportant core research activities are funded at $675 million,” the subcommittee release states. That would be a $1 million cut to NIST’s Scientific and Technical Research and Services program, and far below the White House’s request for $755 million.NOAA: A $5.2 billion allotment would amount to a $274 million cut below current levels, and far less than the president’s request for $5.98 billion. The bill would maintain funding for major weather satellite programs, but the subcommittee provided few other details.Census Bureau: A $1.1 billion budget would be $25 million above current spending, but $387 million below the request. “The additional funding is for research and planning activities as we approach the next decennial census,” according to the statement.The Senate has yet to release a draft of its version of the CJS spending bill.last_img read more

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Science gets little attention in Australian budget

first_imgBlink and you missed it. Science got barely a mention in Australia’s 2016–17 federal budget released yesterday. Total spending won’t be known until someone tallies the line items scattered across government departments. But there is little to suggest any recovery from the $2.2 billion decline in support for science, innovation, and research since 2014. It was “no surprise that there is little new for science in [the] budget,” says Catriona Jackson, CEO of Science and Technology Australia in Canberra, the country’s top scientific society.It was cautiously crafted, being released days before Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull is expected to call a federal election. The one big-ticket item for science in the budget, announced in Canberra last night by treasurer Scott Morrison, is $820 million for the National Innovation and Science Agenda (NISA), launched last December. Designed to enhance innovation and entrepreneurship and promote science, math, and computing education, few details were revealed beyond tax breaks to encourage investment in research and development by small and medium enterprises and tax incentives for angel investors.But there are no NISA initiatives to boost cooperation between industry and public research labs, an area where the country performs poorly. Australia ranked last out of 33 countries in the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development for public-private collaborations in 2013. Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Emailcenter_img Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Leaders of Australia’s scientific community were unusually quiet about the budget. Chief Scientist Alan Finkel declined to comment to ScienceInsider. Only the Australian Academy of Science’s president, Andrew Holmes, offered some support, “warmly” welcoming an initial ramp up in funding for polar science as part of a $1.6 billion Australian Antarctic Strategy and 20 Year Action Plan announced last week.On the environmental front, the Great Barrier Reef Plan and Trust receives a small $128 million boost to extend its program on reef resilience. In contrast, the resources industry will benefit from an $86 million grant to Geoscience Australia to model mineral, groundwater, and petroleum resources. There will also be yet-to-be-specified support to the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation to process spent fuel.Budget support for fundamental research is mixed, with funds taken from the well-established public-private Cooperative Research Centers Program to add $9 million in support for the Australian Astronomical Observatory. Threatened plans to ax the National Collaborative Research Infrastructure Strategy, which supports high-end equipment like supercomputers and imaging facilities, are on hold.The nation’s troubled national research agency, the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization (CSIRO) got scant mention. “We are backing coinvestment in new spin-offs and startsups created by Australia’s research institutions, through the CSIRO,” Morrison said. There is also support for CSIRO to assist other public labs to commercialize their research. The government appears to support CSIRO head Larry Marshall’s drive to refocus on industry-oriented research.The budget includes previously announced funding of $77 million over 4 years for agencies developing clean and renewable energy. But there is no mention of the support, if any, for research into climate change.last_img read more

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The turkey on your Thanksgiving table is older than you think

first_img The turkey on your Thanksgiving table is older than you think By Michael PriceNov. 21, 2018 , 11:55 AM Email Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country ca2hill/iStockPhoto If you celebrate Thanksgiving, you’re taking part in a culinary tradition that traces back thousands—not hundreds—of years. Turkeys served as ceremonial centerpieces for Mayan rulers as early as 350 B.C.E., according to archaeologist Erin Thornton at Washington State University in Pullman.Thornton and her mentor, Kitty Emery, curator of environmental archaeology at the Florida Museum of Natural History in Gainesville, have been shining a light on the early domestication of turkeys for more than a decade. Their work was the first to reveal that Mayans raised and managed wild turkeys (Meleagris gallopavo)—the same species as the Butterball on your table—more than 2300 years ago, making them the first vertebrates to be domesticated on the North American continent.Thornton spoke with Science about how archaeologists look for evidence of early domestication in these birds and what they meant for the ancient civilizations that reared them. The conversation has been edited for clarity and length. 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Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Q: What got you interested in turkeys?A: In grad school I was working at a site called El Mirador in northern Guatemala. It’s famous for being one of the earliest, biggest Maya cities. I was studying animal bones found at a site called the Jaguar Paw Temple. I found turkeys, and some of them looked like Meleagris gallopavo, the wild turkey, which is found throughout the eastern U.S., the American Southwest, and down into much of Mexico. The bones did not belong to the ocellated turkey [M. ocellata], which is native to the Mayan region. My adviser assumed I must have made a mistake. But eventually through genetic evidence we proved they were indeed wild turkeys.Q: How did these wild turkeys get to Guatemala?A: It is difficult to say. They were very likely reared on-site rather than being imported. An animal’s diet is reflected in biochemical markers called isotope ratios. As an animal feeds and drinks, strontium, a type of metal found in soil, is incorporated into their body tissues, including bones. Strontium values in the El Mirador turkeys match the local strontium values at the site, which are very different from the values found in central Mexico.The turkeys could have initially been obtained via trade or gifting, as there is evidence of the movement of other materials from Central Mexico into the Maya. It is also possible that people from central Mexico brought them there directly, but this is a more difficult idea to prove.Q: How do we know the Mayans domesticated the birds?A: One of the best ways to look at early domestication is through reconstruction of ancient diets. So again, we turn to isotope ratios. We can test stable isotope ratios in archaeological bones to see when they switched from a wild diet to being fed something like corn. That really is the way we’re identifying the earliest domestic turkeys. They start eating the same things that the humans are eating.And that’s what we see in the bones from El Mirador. Isotope analysis reveals they were eating a substantial amount of corn in their diets.Q: What’s so special about turkeys?A: Turkeys are large-bodied. They’re pretty tame. They’ll feed in agricultural fields; they like the insects that are found in cornfields. People may have tolerated their presence in the fields because they’re excellent insect removers. They’re essentially pest control. And turkeys have a tolerance for human-disturbed environments. We see that even around our communities today. If we’re not hunting them like crazy, they persist in the fields and settlements.Q: Did the ancient Mayans eat a lot of turkey?A: It doesn’t seem so. The theme that really emerges in terms of animal domestication in Mesoamerica is that it’s not necessarily about food. People were eating dogs and turkeys, but primarily for elite display—things like feasting or rituals. They’re not necessarily being used to feed the masses.Q: That sounds a bit like Thanksgiving feasts today.A: It totally is. The turkey is the only vertebrate animal domesticated on the North American continent. Dogs were already domesticated when they accompanied humans into the Americas. Horses, cows, pigs, chickens—all of those were introduced from other places.So in my mind, it really is this iconic American bird with a long history of importance, and now it’s celebrated at Thanksgiving. It’s changed quite a bit in its meaning, but there’s this continuity of symbolic importance.Q: White meat or dark meat?A: Both. Probably a little more dark meat. But unfortunately we’re traveling over Thanksgiving so I won’t be having either this year. I’ll probably make up for it later.last_img read more

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Wave of horse deaths on famed racetrack stumps scientists

first_img Wave of horse deaths on famed racetrack stumps scientists SANTA ANITA PARK Riders arrive at the Santa Anita track in Southern California on 8 March. A horse’s age, sex, and racing experience can all affect its risk of injury, as can preexisting stress fractures. Some experts also suspect veterinary drugs. Joe Pagan, president of Kentucky Equine Research in Versailles, recently found that furosemide, used to stop airway hemorrhaging as a result of exertion, and omeprazole, a treatment for stomach ulcers, both affect calcium excretion and absorption, which could theoretically weaken bones; the Stronach Group, which owns Santa Anita, recently said it would ban the use of drugs on racing days. But Pagan says a connection to the injuries is “a big stretch.” Others have noted that more than 90% of racehorses nationwide have stomach ulcers, and most are treated with furosemide, so the drugs’ effects wouldn’t be limited to Santa Anita.Instead, many scientists think something about Santa Anita’s dirt track must be to blame. After the 21st death this season, the Stronach Group invited Mick Peterson of the Racing Surfaces Testing Laboratory, a nonprofit organization in Lexington, Kentucky, to study the problem. Peterson ran chemical and x-ray diffraction studies on track samples, testing, among other things, the soil’s density, moisture content, and mineralogical qualities.He also examined the consistency of the track’s layers. The top layer, called the cushion, is soft and granular, to dampen the impact on the horse’s foot; the one below, called the pad, is harder and more compact, allowing for more “push-off ” of the hoof. (Below that are two more layers called the hardpan and the base.) Horses probably adjust to different surfaces as long as they’re consistent, Peterson says, but injuries could result if the track characteristics change from stride to stride. His team brought in a machine, towed behind a vehicle, that mimics a galloping horse’s forelimb plunging into the track and collects data on deceleration, sliding, surface elasticity, and energy absorption. They also used ground penetrating radar to measure the depths of the layers every 10 centimeters along the track. Email Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe The Southern California racetrack famous for historic wins by thoroughbred greats such as Seabiscuit, John Henry, and Zenyatta is struggling to explain a series of fatal accidents in horses. In less than 3 months, 22 horses have died on the Santa Anita tracks in Arcadia, most of them from catastrophic limb fractures, leading managers to shut it down on 14 March.The string of fatalities has spurred outcries from animal welfare activists and caused major economic loss—but it also mystifies scientists who study horse racing and racetracks. Some believe heavy rainfall may have caused irregular compaction of the dirt track layers, increasing the risk of fractures when horses’ hooves penetrate the ground at high speeds. “Dirt tracks are particularly dangerous because they can seem fine on the surface but hide the compaction deep below,” says Nathalie Crevier-Denoix of the French National Institute of Agricultural Research and the National Veterinary School in Alfort, near Paris. But a battery of tests by U.S. experts has failed to show anything unusual.Injuries so serious they cause death or require immediate euthanasia because they can’t be repaired occur on every racetrack. The most common type is a fracture of the front fetlock, a hinge joint between the foot and the lower leg bones that is “an important shock absorber, like airplane landing gear,” says Susan Stover, a veterinary researcher at the University of California, Davis. At Santa Anita, the catastrophic injury rate has doubled compared with last year. Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country None of the tests revealed anything unusual. “There’s nothing that we know, based on what we know, that’s wrong with the track,” Peterson says. Santa Anita reopened its tracks on 11 March, after his results had come in; within days a 3-year-old filly sustained fractures in both forelimbs and was euthanized, and the shutdown resumed.Peterson says current testing methods could miss problems with moisture management on the dirt track. The cushion layer works best when it contains about 14% water, he says. Track managers have an array of techniques for managing moisture, such as sealing water out during wet weather by rolling the surface overnight, or “harrowing” and watering the track during dry weather to offset evaporation. But moisture levels can still change dramatically throughout a race day, especially when heavy rainfall alternates with bright sun and desert winds. Complicating matters further, Santa Anita’s grandstand casts a large, evolving shadow across part of the dirt track. The departure of Dennis Moore, a seasoned surface manager who retired from Santa Anita in December 2018, may also have played a role, although it’s not clear how much practices have changed since then. “If the maintenance wasn’t perfect, that may have been a factor,” Peterson says.Peterson is now studying how well different management techniques work after rainstorms. Necropsies of the fallen horses may also offer clues by revealing whether certain types of injury were more common.Santa Anita officials didn’t respond to Science’s request for comment. But they have evidently decided they can’t wait for science to come up with definitive answers. Moore has been brought back as a consultant, and as Science went to press, Santa Anita was slated to reopen on 29 March. By Christa Lesté-LasserreMar. 27, 2019 , 3:20 PM IRFAN KHAN/LOS ANGELES TIMES/GETTY IMAGES Researchers used a machine that mimics a galloping horse foot to do biomechanical tests on Santa Anita’s dirt track. Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*)last_img read more

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Lions wounded by porcupines may be more likely to attack people

first_img Lions wounded by porcupines may be more likely to attack people In 1965, an emaciated male lion attacked and killed a villager in the Darajani region of Tsavo, Kenya. Locals led American hunter John Perrott to the animal, where he shot and killed it. While admiring his trophy shortly thereafter, Perrott noticed something unusual: a sharp quill jutting out of the lion’s left nostril.Now, more than 50 years later, researchers have revealed that the quill belonged to a porcupine—and may have been behind the lion’s taste for people. “Every time [the lion] opened his mouth to eat, the damn quill pushed in further,” says Gastone Celesia, a volunteer at the Field Museum and professor emeritus of neurology at Loyola University, both in Chicago, Illinois. Celesia and his colleagues speculate that—starving and with a compromised sense of smell—the lion turned from its standard prey to an easier-to-catch quarry: humans.This may not be an isolated incident. A number of lion attacks on humans may have been prompted by porcupines injuring the big cats, Celesia and colleagues write this month in the Journal of East African Natural History. Email By Rachel CrowellMay. 21, 2019 , 11:00 AM Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe A young lion grapples with a Cape porcupine in South Africa’s Kalahari Gemsbok National Park.center_img J. Sneesby/B. Wilkins/Getty Images Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country “It’s a very interesting and important study,” says Laurence Frank, project director of the Kenya-based conservation group Living with Lions, who wasn’t involved with the work. “I was actually surprised by the high rate of porcupine killing and eating” by the big cats, he says.As far back as the 1600s, people have encountered lions injured by porcupines. In 1656 alone, Jan van Riebeeck, commander for the Dutch East India Company, observed two dead lions in Cape Town, South Africa, with porcupine injuries: One, shot after it ate a cow, had numerous quills in its skin; the other, found dead on a beach, had a porcupine quill sticking deep in its chest. Lions don’t often attack porcupines, but they can when prey is scarce or if they are young and inexperienced hunters.To get a better sense of how often these encounters occur, and what impact they have on humans and other animals, Celesia—along with team leader Julian Kerbis Peterhans, a researcher at the Field Museum, and Thomas Gnoske, an assistant collections manager at the museum—scanned the scientific literature for evidence of porcupine attacks on lions. They also analyzed anecdotes such as van Riebeeck’s, which he recorded in his personal journal. Altogether, the researchers identified approximately 50 lions injured by porcupines, at least five of which went on to attack or kill people or livestock. Young male lions were the most likely to be injured, possibly because they’re inexperienced hunters, the team speculates.Perrott’s trophy, which was part of the 50, was scanned with computerized tomography at the University of Chicago Pritzker School of Medicine on behalf of the researchers. The scans confirmed that, based on the quill’s proximity to the lion’s frontal sinuses and other key nasal structures, the animal likely had difficulty smelling and had other impairments that would have made it hard to hunt. The researchers also deduced that the lion was approximately 4 years old when it died.The researchers don’t know how many porcupine-injured lions actually go on to kill people or livestock, but they believe it “greatly increases the risk,” Kerbis Peterhans says. He and his colleagues suspect the wounded lions are more likely to go after people and livestock because the cats are too weak or ill to pursue their typical prey, wildebeest and zebra, which are bigger, faster, and harder to locate. Indeed, at the time of its death, the “Darajani maneater” was “emaciated … with protruding backbone, scapula, ribs, limbs and pelvic carriage,” the researchers report.One major limitation of the study is that it contains no direct observation of lions being impaled by quills, wrote Craig Packer in an email. Packer, who directs the University of Minnesota’s Lion Research Center in St. Paul, also questioned the finding that young male lions—which tend to be solitary—are more likely to be injured by porcupines. “I’ve seen females remove quills from their pride mates, so it may just be that males are more likely to be seen with quills still stuck in their bodies.”If porcupines really are causing lions to attack people more frequently, Kerbis Peterhans says it’s critical that injured animals be treated as soon as possible. That won’t just save the big cats, he says, it could help save people as well. Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*)last_img read more

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Couple Nearly Killed By Cops Shut Down Apology

first_imgMy statement on the May 27th Phoenix Police incident: pic.twitter.com/1mYHQQbhWv— Mayor Kate Gallego (@MayorGallego) June 16, 2019According to ABC, Phoenix Police Chief Jeri Williams, who is a Black woman, apologized as well on television, saying, “Every time I look a that video its extremely unsettling. I apologize to the family, I apologize to the community.”“I don’t accept the apology,” Aisha Harper said Monday, with Dravon Ames adding, “It’s not sincere,” the Associated Press reports.Rev. Jarrett Maupin, a local civil rights advocate, also stated, “It’s absolutely absurd you can talk about apologizing and seek to move beyond something without actually disciplining and firing these officers.”Harper also revealed her older daughter is now terrified of the police “wets the bed, wakes up crying.”Originally, the Phoenix police department has refused to release their officers names. However, Twitter  did their research. According to activist Shaun King, the officers are Christopher Meyer, Nicholas Welch, Agnes Milbourn and Brian Herricht. See the tweet below, which also includes their badge numbers.The May 29 video shows a Phoenix police officer screaming threats and profanity toward the couple and their two young daughters.“You’re gonna fucking get shot!” the cop yells at one point.“I’m gonna put a fucking cap in your fucking head,” he said in another instance. Phoenix police officers are trying to do damage control after they threatened to kill a Black family over a doll possibly being stolen from a dollar store. However, Dravon Ames, 22, and his pregnant fiance Aisha Harper, 24, are not accepting their apology from them or the city and have filed an epic lawsuit. Aisha Harper , Dravion Ames , Jay Z , Phoenix Police Department Entertainment, News and Lifestyle for Black America. News told by us for us. Black America’s #1 News Source: Our News. Our Voice. Thanks for signing up! Get ready for Exclusive content, Interviews,and Breaking news delivered direct to your inbox. Get ready for Exclusive content, Interviews,and Breaking news delivered direct to your inbox. Meghan McCain Whines That She Can’t Attack llhan Omar Because Trump Is Too Racist “My hands are up! My hands are up!” 22yo Dravon Ames says as a Phoenix police officer yells to “get your fucking hands up.” The same officer later says “You’re gonna fucking get shot!”Ames says the officers stopped him after his child walked out of a Dollar Store with a doll. pic.twitter.com/Nlkd7IXsyc— Meg O’Connor (@megoconnor13) June 12, 2019 More By NewsOne Staff See Also: Mike Pence Has The Unchristian Nerve To Compare Trump To Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.Phoenix Mayor Kate Gallego issued a statement on Twitter that read, “I am deeply sorry for what this family went through, and I apologize to our community. This is not who we are, and I refuse to allow this type of behavior to go unchallenged.” SUBSCRIBE viral video of father speaking with baby son 35 Positive Images Of Black Dads That Shatter False Stereotypes On Father’s Day Meyer also pointed a gun at the group threatening to shoot them and demanding Harper put her baby on the hot ground despite the fact she could not walk. And all of this because a four-year-old allegedly took a 99 cent doll.Following the outrage, Jay-Z‘s philanthropic organization within his entertainment company ROC Nation offered to provide legal support to Ames and Harper, who filed a claim on Thursday demanding $10 million from the city of Phoenix.Let’s hope they get a big check for this disgusting behavior from the police.SEE ALSO:Sudan Is Burning But People Don’t Care Because It’s Not A CathedralBlack Teacher Gives Students Haircuts For Graduation A$AP Rocky Being In A Swedish Prison Will Not Stop Her From Going To The Country That Showed Her ‘So Much Love’ Gov. Cuomo Slams Mayor Bill De Blasio For The Eric Garner Case But He Also Failed The Familylast_img read more

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