New Partnership Forms Family Justice Center In Thurston County

first_imgFacebook0Tweet0Pin0 Submitted by Thurston County Prosecutor’s OfficeOLYMPIA –Thurston County Clerk Betty Gould, Thurston County Sheriff John Snaza, Thurston County Prosecutor Jon Tunheim, and the Executive Director of the Family Support Center Schelli Slaughter, are pleased to announce a new partnership, the Thurston County Family Justice Center.  The Family Justice Center will provide advocacy for victims of domestic violence and sexual assault in criminal cases, assist with civil protection orders and civil family law matters, and provide referrals to social and other support services.Staff from the County Prosecutor’s Office, the County Clerk, and the County Sheriff’s Office will be available to assist clients at the Family Support Center building, which is less than two blocks from the Olympia Transit Center at 108 State Street.  Staff from the Northwest Justice Project and the Family Support Center of South Sound will also be located at the new center.“We are proud to welcome the Thurston County Family Justice Center to the Family Support Center both as a partner and as a new service provider in our building,” says Schelli Slaughter, Executive Director of the Family Support Center.  “The Family Support Center was founded to strengthen families in our community by offering an array of collaborative, coordinated, client-centered services under one roof.  The Thurston County Family Justice Center perfectly complements this best practice model and will fulfill a critical need for domestic violence and sexual assault survivors who seek co-located services.”The Thurston County Family Justice Center gathers together law enforcement, legal experts, victim advocates and social service providers in one place, making it easier for domestic violence and sexual assault victims to begin to rebuild their lives with protection orders, emergency housing, child care resources, and other legal and social services.   A recent client said, “It has been two years since my assault.  All the professionals connected with the Family Justice Center have continued to help me through the healing process and now I am back to being myself.”“It’s important to have a collaborative and coordinated approach for domestic violence, sexual assault and stalking cases,” said Jon Tunheim, Prosecuting Attorney. “Victims may become intimidated and discouraged if they are forced to go to six or eight different places and talk to a dozen different people to get basic help. Having one office in downtown Olympia makes it easier for victims to access the justice they deserve and rebuild their lives.”  The Thurston County Family Justice Center also offers monthly outreach clinics in Rochester and Yelm.WHAT:           Thurston County Family Justice CenterWHEN:           Regular business hours are Monday – Friday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.WHERE:         108 State Avenue S.W., Olympia, WA 98501, 2nd FloorPHONE:    360 915-8940For more information about the new Thurston County Family Justice Center and information about services and assistance for victims of domestic violence, sexual assault and stalking, visit the Thurston County Family Justice Center web page at www.thurstoncountyfjc.org.last_img read more

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Tiny House Advocate Speaks at Olympia Timberland Library

first_imgFacebook0Tweet0Pin0 Submitted by the Timberland Regional LibraryOlympia resident Dee Williams hand-crafted her beautiful 84 square foot house and wrote a book about the experience, “The Big Tiny: A Built-It-Myself-Memoir.” She will speak at the Olympia Timberland Library on Thursday, July 31 from 7:30 to 8:45 p.m.In building her tiny home, Williams discovered that the important stuff in life isn’t stuff.“Admitting that I’m “happy enough” makes me wonder if I’m falling short of my potential as a middle-class American,” Williams writes on her website. “But the facts are the facts,” she continues, “I found a certain bigness in my little house – a sense of largeness, freedom, and happiness that comes when you see there’s no place else you’d rather be.”Jim Lynch, author of “The Highest Tide,” writes: “The Big Tiny” is irresistible. Dee Williams is as much fun on the page as she is in person. Comic, silly, and soulful, she takes us on her journey to simplify her life and along the way tunes in to our own inner desire to pare down to our nearly naked selves.”Williams founded Portland Alternative Dwellings (PAD) to help others find a way to make their housing serve their lives. She has been featured in The New York Times, Los Angeles Times, Yahoo.com, National Public Radio, CBS This Morning and more.Attendees may bring their own copies of the book to be signed. Books will also be available for purchase. Learn more about Dee and the tiny house movement at www.padtinyhouses.com.This program will take place after regular library hours and no other services will be available.The Olympia Timberland Library is located at 313 8th Ave.SE.  For more information contact the library at (360) 352-0595 or visit www.TRL.orglast_img read more

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Thurston EDC Business Recognition Awards Gala and Investor Dinner May 19

first_imgFacebook13Tweet0Pin0Submitted by Thurston Economic Development CouncilThe Thurston Economic Development Council announced the finalists for the upcoming Business Recognition Awards. The Awards Gala and Investor Dinner will take place on May 19, 2017 beginning at 5:30 p.m. with reception and program/dinner following at 6:30 p.m. at the Olympia County & Golf Club, 3636 Country Club Rd NW Olympia, WA 98502.This is the 32nd year the Thurston EDC will host the awards, which honors the achievements of local businesses and non-profits in four distinct categories: New Business, Small Business, Corporate Employer, and Non-Profit Organization.New Business of the Year Finalists include:Broth Bar by SaltFire & Time222 Marketplace LLCChelsea Farms Oyster BarThe Mouse Trap and Blind Pig SpiritsFinalists for Small Business of the Year are:PCI Pest ControlNorthAmericaTalk, Inc.Zoe Juice BarNon-Profit of the Year Finalists include:Big Brothers Big Sisters of Southwest WashingtonCapital LakefairPacific Mountain Workforce Development CouncilCorporate Employer of the Year finalists are:Olympia Federal SavingsAtlas Dental GroupZiemek Dental Laboratory, Inc.The Business Recognition Awards Gala and Investor Dinner is open to the public and will include an awards program that tells the story of each of the finalists and opportunities to network. To register for the 2017 Business Recognition Awards and Investor Gala, or become a sponsor, please contact Michael Cade at 360-464-6041 or visit the Thurston Economic Development Council’s website. The cost is $65 per person or $500 for a table of eight.About the Thurston Economic Development CouncilThe Thurston EDC is a private non-profit organization focused on creating a vital and sustainable economy in Thurston County that supports the livelihood and values of our residents.last_img read more

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Black Hills High School Video Team Wins National Award

first_imgFacebook88Tweet0Pin0Submitted by Tumwater School DistrictBlack Hills High School iVideo team of students Ally Remy, Kyle Fischer, Gabrielle Mitchell, Michael Lemon and Kelsie Otos received the Alliance for Community Media (ACM) national award for the BEST VIDEO in the “Hometown Media Award” category!The video “Day in the Life” (see video here) made for Tumwater Middle School was produced with the assistance of Thurston Community Media in the winter of the 2016-17 school year. This was a collaborative effort and the results were spectacular! Seeing the need for Tumwater Middle to produce a video as 6th graders would be joining the middle school level (new middle school structure) in the fall of 2017, Video Productions teacher Susan M. Larson, technology TOSA Justin McKaughan, and TMS Asst. Principal Nick Reykdal got the project started and assisted throughout the process of the video production.The award will be received by Thurston Community Media and Tumwater School District personnel this summer in Baltimore, MD.last_img read more

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No Intercity Transit Service on Thanksgiving Day

first_imgFacebook18Tweet0Pin0Submitted by Intercity TransitIntercity Transit will be closed on Thanksgiving Day, Thursday, November 28, 2019. Regular local bus, Express, Dial-A-Lift, and Village Vans will not operate. Customer Service located in the Olympia Transit Center and the business office will also be closed.The Dial-A-Lift reservation line will be closed, but customers can leave ride requests or cancellation messages on Dial-A-Lift’s voicemail at 360-705-5827. Intercity Transit reminds Dial-A-Lift customers with standing rides to cancel their unneeded rides for the Thanksgiving holiday weekend.We will operate on normal schedules Friday, November 29, 2019.For route and schedule information, visit intercitytransit.com/bus/routes or contact Customer Service at 360-786-1881.last_img read more

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City of Tenino Modifies Procedures During COVID-19 Pandemic

first_imgFacebook17Tweet0Pin0Submitted by City of TeninoHaving proclaimed an emergency on March 12, 2020, due to the COVID-19 pandemic, Mayor Wayne Fournier announced today that the City of Tenino has modified certain procedures related to the manner and means the City will use to continue to provide services to the citizens of Tenino.To the extent permitted by Governor Inslee’s Proclamation 20-05, as amended, the City has directed it’s employees to continue to work while observing all Social Distancing Guidelines as set forth by the Washington State Department of Health:https://www.doh.wa.gov/Portals/1/Documents/1600/coronavirus/SocialDistancingGuidance.pdfhttps://www.doh.wa.gov/Emergencies/NovelCoronavirusOutbreak2020/CommunitiesandCommunityOrganizationsThe modified procedures refer to nine (9) broad categories, including Utility Billing, Permits, Inspections, and Tenino Municipal Court Operations, among others.  All modifications are fully explained on the City’s website, which can be accessed here:  https://cityoftenino.us/cityhall/page/modifications-procedures-due-covid-19last_img read more

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Harbhajan Singh petitions Sourav Ganguly to change the selection panel after Sashi Tharoor bats…

first_imgImage Courtesy: IPL/BCCIAdvertisement acmNBA Finals | Brooklyn Vsf3z2fWingsuit rodeo📽Sindre Egxx( IG: @_aubreyfisher @imraino ) 5Would you ever consider trying this?😱nbaawaCan your students do this? 🌚sRoller skating! Powered by Firework Sanju Samson, the young wicket keeper batsman has been dropped from the Twenty 20 squad, and the decision has raised alot of eyebrows, especially from Shashi Tharoor, and the one and only Harbhajan Singh himself. In an appeal for a stronger selection panel, he made his direct call to the present BCCI president Sourav Ganguly on Twitter.Advertisement Image Courtesy: IPL/BCCISamson was not selected for the recent T20 series against Bangladesh earlier this month. Now, another rejection for the 25 year old from the selection panel, fired up none other than Shashi Tharoor.The 63 year old politician wrote on Twitter: Very disappointed to see @IamSanjuSamson dropped without a chance. He carried the drinks for three T20Is & has been promptly discarded. Are they testing his batting or his heart?”Advertisement The tweet caught up to Bhajji, and the 39 year old mentioned Sourav Ganguly in a retweet to look over the members of the selection panel.Check out Harbhajan’s tweet below-Advertisement Less than two weeks remain for the upcoming West Indies T20 series, and this will decide if Sanju Samson will undergo a final selection process or not.A right handed batsman, Samson has 55 T20 caps for the Men in Blue, and plays for Rajasthan Royals in the Indian Premier League. Advertisementlast_img read more

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Kids Learn Tips On Rip Currents, Sharks

first_img“They’re a little scary, but if you know more about them, you can be respectful, not fearful,” said Williams, a post-doctoral coastal ecologist at Stevens Institute of Technology, Hoboken.In a shark encounter, do not splash because the shark could take it for prey, such as a seal, Williams said.Teresa Sperber, a member of the board of the Library Association, which does fundraising and programming for the library, said she arranged Williams’ talk because she was familiar with Sea Grant after two of her children – Paul, 12, and Cecilia, 8 – attended camp at Sea Grant this summer. “I thought it was very informative,” Sperber said. “I think the kids learned a lot in a fun style,” Sperber said. About 20 children and five adults attended.Williams conducts two other programs for the community, a for-adults version of the one presented at the library and another on dune management, also for adults. Williams can be reached through Sea Grant, 732-872-1300, or at Amy.Williams@stevens.edu. Story and photos by Joseph SapiaRUMSON – With swimmer Michael Phelps racking up gold medals for Team USA in the Summer Olympics, it may be interesting to know he is much slower than a common Jersey Shore visitor.Rip currents can move “two times as fast as an Olympic swimmer,” said Amy Williams, a coastal ecology extension agent for the Sandy Hook-based New Jersey Sea Grant Consortium.That was one of the facts presented in “Ocean Hazards: Sharks and Rip Currents,” a children-oriented talk Williams did at the Oceanic Free Library, here, on Wednesday, Aug. 10.A rip current is “a current of water that rips you away from the shore,” Williams said. When waves come in, the water has to go back out – the channeling of that outgoing water in one location is a rip current.Aside from avoiding panic and swimming parallel to the shore, try to get a lifeguard’s attention if swimming in a rip current, Williams said. “Rip currents take you out to sea, but they stay on the surface,” she said. “They don’t go out very far.”Mary Catherine O’Connor, 9, who lives in the borough, said she came away with new knowledge. “I learned sharks don’t mean to attack you and a lot about rip currents and how to be safe in them.” Her sister, Eleanor, 11, said she learned that to get out of a rip current: swim parallel to the shore to escape the narrow funneling of water.Margot O’Connor of Rumson holds her daughter, Claire, 6, while attending a talk at the Oceanic Free Library, Rumson. O’Connor is vice president of the library association.The children also learned that a swimmer is safer if using a flotation device, and panic is a main reason people get in trouble in rip currents.Williams talked about shark attacks.In 2015, for example, there were 96 reported shark attacks worldwide, with only six deaths from these, Williams said. Of the 300 to 400 species of sharks, only three – great white, bull and tiger – are known to attack humans, she said.last_img read more

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Middletown Breaks Ground on New Town Hall Complex

first_imgLast year the township unveiled plans for the new building. As part of their larger vision, officials will decide in the coming months whether to lease or sell two pad sites at the municipal complex. Those new revenues will “help offset the cost of this project,” Fiore said. MIDDLETOWN – Thetownship hopes to opena new 72,000-square-foottown hall in summer 2021,in partnership with a realestate company. “And what you will see from this municipal complex is a municipal complex that our world class police department will flourish with,” Fiore said. Brandywine president Eric C. Moore, a former college basketball player at the University of Pennsylvania in the 1990s, said he valued what “a good team can do.” Perry said the township had looked at renovating the current town hall, a project that would have cost between $25 million and $35 million. He said the building, now home to the municipal health department, is becoming a township-run animal shelter. Brandywine Acquisitions and Development, part of the Brandywine Companies headquartered in Pennsylvania, will pay to construct the building and charge the township around $3 million annually in rent through a 30-year lease. At the end of the lease term, the township will retake ownership of the land, now a parking lot next to the current town hall. “We don’t have the space to grow,” Perry said. “We don’t have a place where we can grow into. Every municipality is looking for new ways to save taxpayer dollars. Part of that is through shared-service agreements. And we need to ensure that we have the space to grow those shared-service agreements.” He was joined by local officials and others for the late afternoon event. With rain falling, Mayor Tony Perry said the new building would give township residents and municipal employees “a place that they can be proud of, a place that they can see their investment, a place where the leaders of the future will continue to build on the progress that we’ve made.” Perry said the town’s 13 female officers – the most of any police force in the county – do not have a dedicated changing room and instead have to use a private bathroom. He said the police locker room floods every time it rains. “At that time, the mayor preceding me and myself, our office consisted of a filing cabinet in the clerk’s office,” he said. By Philip Sean Curran “This has been a long day coming,” said former mayor and current Freeholder Gerry P. Scharfenberger. “A lot of meetings, a lot of presentations.” Township officials have said most government functions will be housed under one roof once the building opens. That will eliminate the need for residents to go to more than one place to conduct their business. Township administrator Anthony P. Mercantante said the current town hall was built in 1960, at a time when the community’s population was 39,000 people and the police department had 28 officers. Fast forward to the present: Middletown has grown to 68,000 people and 126 officers. “Because right now, if you want to get a passport from the clerk, you want to pay your dog license and you want to apply for a permit in town, you’ve got to go to three different buildings,” Perry said in an interview after the ceremony. During construction, municipal employees in town hall will continue to work there. The building eventually will be demolished and the land turned into a parking lot. Last week’s ceremony brought back past town officials, like former Mayor Frank Self, who led the community in the early 1980s. “This is a really unique deal,” Deputy Mayor Anthony P. Fiore said at the ceremony in the municipal complex on Kings Highway. “This is a deal that, in a public-private partnership, is what I believe the first of its kind.” At a groundbreaking ceremony June 20 for the new town hall, the township said it was also breaking new ground by having a public-private partnership for the building. Overall, the project will cost $56 million, the township has said. “It’s been such a pleasureto work with the town toget this deal done,” he said.“We’re really partners withthe town.”last_img read more

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Wildcats finish 11th overall at AA Boy’s Volleyball tournament

first_imgThe Northern squad won the match 25-21, 25-22.W.L. Seaton of Vernon defeated Langley Fundamental in the final of the AA tournament Saturday. MEI of Abbotsford defeated Winfield’s George Elliott to claim the bronze medal.Prince Charles of Creston, the other Kootenay rep at the tournament, finished seventh.Mount Sentinel had advanced to the game against D.P.Todd by stopping Prince Rupert Rainmakers 2-1 Thursday. The Cats won the third and deciding game 17-15.Sahali of Kamloops knocked the West Kootenay reps into the placement side of the draw by scoring a 3-0 victory in the best-of-five playoff match earlier in the day.The Cats lost the match 25-17, 27-25, 25-17. Mount Sentinel completed Wednesday’s power pool round with a 1-2 record.The Cats rallied for a three-set victory over Kelowna’s Okanagan Mission in the final game of the round robin.Mount Sentinel dropped the opening game 17-25 before winning two straight 25-23 in a thriller and 15-10 in the deciding contest. The win followed a pair of losses earlier in the day against Prince Charles of Creston and Highland of Comox.Mount Sentinel opened the 16-team tournament seeded 12th.CHAMPIONSHIP NOTES: Semiahmoo of White Rock swept rival Earl Marriot 3-0 in the best-of-five match to claim the AAA Boy’s Volleyball title. . . .Kootenay Rep Mount Baker Wild of Cranbrook finished 18th overall after dropping its final match 2-0 to Kwantlen Park. . . .Zack Grigg of Mount Sentinel earned a spot on the Honorable Mention All Star Team. sports@thenelsondaily.com By The Nelson Daily SportsThe Mount Sentinel Wildcats wrapped up the B.C. High School AA Boy’s Volleyball Championships in 11th overall spot folllowing the final day of competition Saturday at the UBC/O gymnasium in Kelowna.D.P. Todd of Prince George swept the Kootenay reps 2-0 in placement game action Friday to knock the Cats into 11th.last_img read more

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