Parramatta Park home like a time-warp to the 1970s

first_img410 Severin St, Parramatta ParkWALK through the doors of this Parramatta Park house and be taken back to a glorious time when ABBA was “in”, Lillee and Thommo were petrifying Poms and the bright spark who invented Facebook was not yet born.The unique Severin St house has barely changed since the 1970s. “It is just a bit different, you certainly don’t see many homes like this around Cairns anymore,” said Hannah Fuller of Belle Property Cairns.“We have people walk through and say it reminds them of their grandparents’ house.”Set on almost 680sq m – a relatively large block for Parramatta Park – the three-bedroom red brick house has been described as a “renovator’s delight”.A rear patio is ideal for entertaining while the neat backyard has been well-maintained.Ms Fuller said Parramatta Park was becoming an increasingly sought-after suburb because of its proximity to town.“Many clients have bought into the area and are running successful Airbnb operations, it’s just so close to the city,” she said. More from newsCairns home ticks popular internet search terms3 days agoTen auction results from ‘active’ weekend in Cairns3 days agoDescribed as a “1970s gem”, the property at 410 Severin St is listed for offers in the low to mid $300,000s. The property is listed for offers in the low to mid $300,000s.According to CoreLogic, the average selling price for Parramatta Park houses was $472,500 as of May this year.The Tablelands man co-ordinating the sale, who asked to be known as Joe, said his parents had “absolutely loved” their many years living in the home.“We were actually keen for them to move years ago but they just loved it so much,” he said.“They were always playing billiards and listing to records – they were real party animals.“I remember once, about 25 years ago, a Japanese guy who was living around the corner offered them $450,000 for the place – but Dad said no.“It was when the Japanese were buying a lot in Cairns, and I guess Mum and Dad had no idea the downturn would happen – but they were very happy.”The property is open for inspection today from 10-10.30amlast_img read more

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NASA Researchers, Doctors Treat First Known Blood Clot in Space

first_imgWhen astronauts suddenly experience a medical situation on the International Space Station 250 miles above Earth, the terms “emergency room” or “urgent care” take on a unique meaning.Late last year, NASA researchers suspected that one of their astronauts was suffering from a blood clot during a long duration stay on the space station.The clot was detected during a vascular study of 11 astronauts that was intended to assess the effect of space on the internal jugular vein. In zero gravity, astronauts’ blood and tissue fluid shifts toward the head.The study involved nine men and two women who were an average age of 46. Their identities were not included in the study.A new assessment of the blood clot was published last Thursday in the New England Journal of Medicine.Six of the participating astronauts experienced stagnant or reverse blood flow, another one had a blood clot, and yet another was considered to have a potential partial blood clot.Scientists weighed the risk of the blood clot, as well as its potential to block a vessel in the absence of gravity.Dr. Stephen Moll, from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill’s School of Medicine, was the only non-NASA physician who was consulted to help the affected astronaut.He says, “My first reaction when NASA reached out to me was to ask if I could visit the International Space Station to examine the patient myself. NASA told me they couldn’t get me up to space quickly enough, so I proceeded with the evaluation and treatment process from here in Chapel Hill.”Moll is a member of UNC’s Blood Research Center and is a blood clot expert.“Normally the protocol for treating a patient with deep vein thrombosis would be to start them on blood thinners for at least three months to prevent the clot from getting bigger and to lessen the harm it could cause if it moved to a different part of the body such as the lungs,” Moll adds. “There is some risk when taking blood thinners that if an injury occurs, it could cause internal bleeding that is difficult to stop. In either case, emergency medical attention could be needed. Knowing there are no emergency rooms in space, we had to weigh our options very carefully.”He spoke with the astronaut during a “phone call from space,” consulting with them as if the person were one of his other patients.The pharmacy aboard the space station contained 20 vials with 300 milligrams each of an injectable blood thinner. Moll directed the astronaut to use them on a daily basis until an anticoagulant drug could be sent to the station during a resupply mission.The astronaut took a higher dose of the injectable, called enoxaparin, for 33 days in order to control the risk of the blood clot. The dose was lowered after that time, as the astronaut awaited the arrival of the drug apixaban.The researchers watched the clot shrink over time. Blood flow was then induced after 47 days through the vein, although spontaneous blood flow was not achieved, even after undergoing treatment for 90 days.The blood clot disappeared 24 hours after landing. Six months later, the astronaut was still free of symptoms.According to Dr. Serena Auñón-Chancellor, study author, NASA astronaut and clinical associate professor of medicine at Louisiana State University’s Health New Orleans School of Medicine, “We still haven’t learned everything about Aerospace Medicine or Space Physiology.”She adds, “The biggest question that remains is how would we deal with this on an exploration class mission to Mars? How would we prepare ourselves medically? More research must be performed to further elucidate clot formation in this environment and possible countermeasures.”last_img read more

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Wellington police notes: Wednesday, August 14, 2013

first_imgWellington Police notes for Wednesday, August 14, 2013•2:50 p.m. Wanda Gray, 42, Wellington was issued a notice to appear charged with dog at large, no current rabies vaccinations and no Wellington registration.•12:43 p.m. Officers investigated burglary, theft and criminal damage to Property in the 900 block. N. Woodlawn, Wellington.•3:45 p.m. Non-Injury accident in the 1200 block S. A, Wellington involving vehicles operated by juvenile female, 17, Wellington and Ralph C. Dry, 70, Wellington.•6:02 p.m. Officers investigated a battery in the 900 block W. 7th, Wellington.•9:23 p.m. Officers investigated a theft by a known suspect in the 2000 block. E. 16th, Wellington.•10:12 p.m. Lana J. Purkey, 43, Wellington, was arrested on a city of Wellington bench warrant for failure to appear.•10:12 p.m. Lana J. Purkey, 43, Wellington, was arrested on a city of Wellington bench warrant for failure to appear.•10:25 p.m. Officers took a report of suspicious activity in the 1100 block. E. 16th, Wellington.last_img read more

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