Professors analyze federal shut down

first_imgThe U.S. government began to shut down for the first time in 17 years early Tuesday morning after a divide in Congress over the Affordable Care Act (ACA) kept the institution from compromising on a budget, therefore, leading to an absence of appropriations, David Campbell, professor of political science at the University of Notre Dame, said. Campbell said the fundamental issue resulting in a shutdown is that members of the Republican Party have taken a stand against the Affordable Care Act and have decided to use what would normally be a routine extension of government financing as a way to try to leverage their power of the purse in order to either stop or delay implementation of the ACA. “Back in the Clinton administration there was a showdown and the government was shut down,” Campbell said. “The consequence of that was the Republicans suffered quite badly because they were blamed by the public for the shutdown. I expect the same will happen this time.” Patrick Pierce, professor of political science at Saint Mary’s, credits the shutdown to a growing divide within the Republican Party itself, specifically amongst members in the House.  “I think the key issue is an intraparty issue within the Republican Party,” Pierce said. “Even further, it is an intraparty issue in the House. The Tea Party Republicans who really want to go to the wall on the Affordable Care Act and do everything they possibly can to eliminate it, are opposed, but not actively opposed by the rest of the party in the institution. “There is not an out-and-out war going on there, but folks that are more in the mainstream of the Republican Party in the house are certainly very conservative, but they don’t want to go as far as the Tea Party will go.” The Tea Party is not a formal organization in that some Republicans are officially card-carrying members and others are not, Campbell said. However, he said over the past few election cycles there has been an increasing number of Republicans elected who are father to the right than the members of Congress they have replaced.  To add to this, Pierce said the big question now is how the Republican Party will deal with this rising division within its entity. “This has been an ongoing issue just manifested in different ways within the Party for a while now,” Pierce said. “This division within the party got manifested in the 2008 campaign where McCain had to deal with the more extreme right of his party. It then got manifested again in 2012 when Romney has to deal with the extreme right of his party. “This has got to get resolved or the Republican Party is going to face some real difficulties.” The shutdown resulted in 800,000 federal employees being furloughed and national parks, monuments and museums, as well as most federal offices, being closed down, while essential federal services stayed up and running, Pierce said.  Uniformed members of the military are included in the list of essential federal government personnel, Pierce said. “Nobody wants to be seen as harming the military, nobody,” Pierce said. “There is nothing more patriotic than the American military, so you had to figure if there was one group that the Democrats and Republicans could get together on and make sure didn’t get hurt it is going to be the American military.” Non-essential government personnel were asked to not come to work on Tuesday, affecting workers across the nation, Campbell said. “It is easy to rail against the federal government without maybe stopping to think about what that really means,” Campbell said. “Even if it is not all government employees affected it is a big chunk of government employees.  “We think of government employees as only working in Washington, but think about the park rangers up at the Indiana Dunes National Park. Those park rangers aren’t getting paid … This is not just going to affect Washington, this is going to have an effect across the nation.” Pete Buttigieg, mayor of South Bend, said he is encouraging Congress to act so his constituents will not continue to be negatively affected by a lack of federal funds.  “I am concerned about the impact the shutdown will have on the local economy, and urge the House to put an end to this before it hurts South Bend even more,” Buttigieg said.  Pierce said the furloughs are probably the most acute impact the shutdown with have on students at Saint Mary’s and Notre Dame.  “My bet is there are a number of students whose parents work for the U.S. government and may end up furloughed and that is a considerable hardship,” Pierce said. “I know of a student at Saint Mary’s whose mother works for the federal government and she was very concerned about the shutdown … There are folks without paychecks and that harms their personal finances.”  With less available to circulate, Pierce said the shutdown will have a negative effect on the nation’s economy.  “If you think about it more broadly that means it [the shutdown] hurts the entire economy because now you have less money circulating in the economy,” Pierce said. “That means less money being used to purchase cars, homes, food, and vacations. Those purchases are what drive the economy.  “That is why President Obama keeps harping on the poor timing of this. It is not as though the economy is rocketing forward just yet, this will slow the economy down, not totally, but it will slow.” Pierce said in order for President Obama to have an effective presidency, he must stay firm on his decision to not “give in” to the Republicans. “I think maybe most folks don’t get is that Obama is noticeably more conservative than most of the members of his party in the House and the Senate and they have kind of gone along with him for the most part, but they have been terribly disappointed in the fact that he did cave in on a number of earlier issues,” Pierce said. Junior Mark Gianfall, president of College Republicans, said he blames partisan politics on the fact the government is currently living “paycheck to paycheck”, but also believes House Republicans were ready to compromise. “I think in this situation you have Republicans willing to compromise,” Gianfall said. “The bill they passed was to delay Obamacare for a year, not get rid of it completely. The Democrats in the Senate just have too big of an ego to even consider anything like that which is really not something against Obamacare because we are not trying to get rid of it at this point we were trying last night [Monday night] to delay it for one year, so the government could keep working in existence, I guess keep working at its full capacity.” Junior Sean Long, president of College Democrats, said the 800,000 furloughed employees are often lost in this blame game and they are the ones seeing the direct effects of the bickering currently going on in Washington. “For me, this whole thing, although I am coming from the democratic perspective, is a mess for us all, Democrats or Republicans,” Long said. “I would call myself a college student before I would call myself a Democrat and this is just horrible to have our lawmakers hold things like annual flu shot vaccinations, the Women, Infants and Children Food and Nutrition (WIC) program … all of these things are going to be cut. This is so much larger than what a lot of people are making it out to be … It makes me angry.”last_img read more

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Life celebrated at memorial mass

first_imgConnor Sorensen was a fighter.Friends said he fought playfully in annual games of Humans vs. Zombies on Notre Dame’s campus. In a more literal sense, Sorensen fought against lifelong lung disease and numerous health issues, a battle he ultimately lost Dec. 20, 2013.Friends and family gathered in the Morrissey Manor chapel Sunday afternoon to celebrate and remember Sorensen, who lived in Morrissey for three years before receiving his degree last fall.In his homily at the memorial mass, Fr. Ronald Vierling, the rector of Morrissey Manor, said Sorensen lived the virtue of faith and always fought with determination.“The important thing to know about Connor, I think, is that he fought the good fight,” Vierling said. “And although his body gave out, his spirit did not.”Senior Sean Brady, one of Sorensen’s close friends, said Sorensen’s toughness was evident throughout his entire life.“He was really tough. … There were times when he would try and handle his condition through sheer force of will,” Brady said. “He was so stubborn and so tough … It was amazing how tough he was and how self-confident and courageous he was.”Photo courtesy of Matt JewellBrady said Sorensen strove to make the most of his time at Notre Dame and fought to stay a part of the Notre Dame community as long as he could.“When he came here, he didn’t think he was going to be living very long, but he really wanted to come to Notre Dame and he really wanted to go to college,” Brady said. “He didn’t want to let the fact that he might not make it to his next birthday dictate his life, and so he came here and he fought to stay here … His doctors wanted him to leave before he did.”Senior Matt Jewell, who lived with Sorensen in Morrissey, said Sorensen refused to give up despite his physical condition.“He never quit,” Jewell said. “He might be slower than the group because his lungs were never functioning properly so he would have to slow down, but he would never stop. He would never quit.”Sorensen’s friend, senior John Mundaden, said Sorensen frequently defied others’ perceptions of his ability to live his life to the fullest.“You think you could define him by looking at him, but it never ceased to amaze me how tough he was and how brave he was,” Mundaden said. “There was nothing that he couldn’t do or wasn’t willing to try, whether that be playing sports with us or playing Humans vs. Zombies.”Jewell said Sorensen did not return to Notre Dame in the fall of 2013 for his senior year because his health deteriorated. Vierling said Sorenson still received his diploma from University Provost Tom Burish and the dean of the College of Science Gregory Crawford, who traveled to Sorenson’s home in Portage, Mich., to present it to him before his death in December.“He did officially graduate,” Jewell said. “He is officially a graduate of Notre Dame, which he and his family are extremely proud of, and rightfully so. He was able to complete all that he did, even with this hardship.”Jewell said Sorenson majored in biochemistry and described him as “the science guy” of their group of friends. He said Sorenson would have gone on to do great things if disease did not cut his life short.“He was probably going to do great things,” Jewell said. “He was brilliant with science and he was dedicated to finding cures for really anything he could because of his hardship. I think everyone lost out because he is not around.”Senior Chris Ayala, another of Sorensen’s friends, said Sorensen was a selfless person despite his health battles.“Connor was a very driven and passionate person and he lived out the ideal of putting others first before himself,” Ayala said. “Something remarkable about him is that he always had this desire to help people. In particular, he wanted to help people who were in the same position as him … so he would go to his doctors and he would read up on new treatments and basically volunteer himself for science to a point.”This selflessness was on display when Sorensen returned to Morrissey last November to tell his friends he did not have much time left, Mundaden said.“When he came by like a week before Thanksgiving to let us know basically that he was in hospice care, and his mentality is that he didn’t want to ruin our holidays,” Mundaden said. “That’s what he was worried about it.”Despite all of his health struggles, Jewell said Sorensen never breathed a word of complaint about his situation.“He would not accept special treatment or really any sort of pity or anything,” Jewell said. “He never complained once.”According to an online remembrance, Sorensen, in addition to participating in Humans vs. Zombies, played the saxophone in the Notre Dame hockey band his freshman year, performed chemistry research and attained the Boy Scouts of America’s highest rank of Eagle Scout.Through all of his hardship and strife, Vierling said Sorensen’s bravery and courage represented the spirit of Notre Dame in a unique way.“Connor’s attitude of defiance toward his illness and struggles represents the spirit of Notre Dame to a degree I don’t think others can,” Vierling said.Tags: Remembrancelast_img read more

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GlassND builds community

first_imgThe Graduate LGBTQ and Ally Student Society at Notre Dame (GlassND) has been working to foster a greater sense of community and inclusion in the University’s graduate school, Tony Cunningham, Quality of Life Chairperson for the Graduate Student Union (GSU), said.GlassND was formed through the efforts of the Graduate Student Union as they aimed to fully address the graduate student community’s needs, Cunningham said.“Part of this position [Quality of Life Chairperson] is to work with some groups that were not receiving as much attention as other groups, one of them being the LGBTQ community within the graduate school,” he said. “In the 2012-2013 school year, we held the first two events explicitly for graduate LGBTQ community members and ally members.”Cunningham said that GlassND works closely with the University’s Gender Relations Center (GRC) for events and programming. “The GRC does a lot of programming, like ally training, and they do an excellent job with that,” Cunningham said.GlassND has transitioned this year from educational activities to community-building and social activities, Cunningham said. They held a Happy Hour & Trivia Night at Legends on Monday.“That [was] our big marquee event for the semester, but we’ve also been doing smaller stuff, like getting together to watch movies or going out and just establishing the social network, so that people don’t feel ostracized or alone when they’re here,” he said. “One of the hardest parts, people tell me, is that they just feel alone, that they don’t have someone to confide in or talk to, so we’re trying to build a community that they can feel open and safe with.” Cunningham said GlassND is currently subgroup of the GSU, not an official club. He said GlassND is looking to increase its membership and involvement before it begins the process to become a group recognized by the University.GlassND hopes to serve as a welcoming entity for prospective graduate students at the University, Cunningham said.“At the moment, especially for LGBTQ students that are investigating [the University], they hear the long-standing rumors about how Notre Dame is with LGBTQ members,” he said. “What we’d like to do is provide the structure so that they have a group to come and join. Another pro of being an official, recognized group would be a structured community that people could reach out to and look to for support, not just when they’re looking to apply here, but also once they are here.”Cunningham said that the graduate school and administration has been very supportive of the group’s efforts. “I work really closely with the administration and the people in the graduate school, and they’ve been absolutely fantastic as we’ve gotten things off the ground,” he said. Tags: GlassND, graduate schoollast_img read more

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‘Aphasia’ producer discusses recovery process

first_imgCarl McIntyre made the movie “Aphasia” in 2010, five years after a stroke damaged 80 percent of his brain’s left hemisphere, thus severely impairing his processes of communication. McIntyre shared the movie and his presentation, “Hope is a Four Letter Word,” in Carroll Auditorium at Saint Mary’s on Thursday night.Susan Latham, chair of the Department of Communicative Sciences and Disorders at the College, said aphasia is a communicative disorder that inhibits language but not intellect, resulting in the loss of the ability to speak and listen. Despite facing this situation and receiving news that he may never speak again, McIntyre continued to make improvements, Latham said.“Carl starred as himself in a short film, recounting his story to adapt to the incredible changes in his life,” she said. “Now, he tours around the world, presenting the movie and motivating people with his story.”Before his stroke, McIntyre worked as a teacher, actor and salesman. In the movie, McIntyre reenacts a year and a half of therapy and learning following the stroke, indicating how losing the ability to communicate changed both his and his family’s life. A presentation given by McIntyre followed the movie.“Having a stroke sucks,” McIntyre said. “Aphasia really sucks. Before I had a stroke, life is good. … Job is voice — actor, teacher and really good sales. … But after stroke, everything’s different. I can’t speak, and I can’t read or write. Nothing, absolutely nothing.”A year and a half after the stroke, he was no better, McIntyre said. Being trapped in one’s head is a prison where there are disappointments everyday, he said.“I remember saying, ‘Live or die, I don’t care. I’m over life,’” he said. “Bad place, really dark, dark place. But Carl is Carl and most times I’m happy.”McIntyre’s recovery was a multi-step process. The first step was to mourn and realize he was no longer the same as the ‘Old Carl,’ he said. He then wrote the word ‘acceptance’ on a large paper pad — the second step towards recovery.“I’m still here,” he said after writing the word. “I’m still relevant and no fear — fearless. … There is hope, hope is everything. No love, no life. … I love to live again, and I love hope.”Another step in the process is hope, McIntyre said, and the final step is progress. No matter if it’s big or small, progress every day matters, he said.He said he is lucky because he is still able to walk, and even though his right side is weaker and his timing is off, he is still able to toss a baseball with his son.McIntyre said having purpose is also very important. Right now his purpose is the movie, he said.“My brain is always on,” he said. “And faster every year because I’m working every day. … I’m trying.”McIntyre said once insurance ran out and he could not pay for certain therapy programs, he did, and continues to, learn to speak again through free study subject programs at various universities. When learning to speak, associating words with pictures is necessary — such as breaking the word “when” into “w-hen,” while thinking of the bird, he said.The best advice he can pass onto future speech therapists and families is patience, he said.“Lot of patience because today is a good day, tomorrow not too much,” McIntyre said. “But patience can never quit. … I’m lucky because friends help life back … and understand I never be the same. My brain is fine. I can’t speak, but I’m no dummy.”“One person understands me, I’m over the moon,” he said. “I know I never be the same, and every day is hard. But every day is good too. Possibilities, endless possibilities. … Aphasia, still sucks, but I win every day and you can too.”Tags: “Hope is a Four Letter Word”, aphasia, Carl McIntyre, speech therapy, strokelast_img read more

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Saint Mary’s receives first patent for Paper Analytic Device

first_imgThe pharmaceutical industry is littered with different drugs and different versions of those drugs. While most ingredients serve a purpose, sometimes, the pharmaceuticals manufacturers buy ingredients that are of low-quality or even inactive that lower the effectiveness of the drug.To solve this issue, Saint Mary’s professor of chemistry and physics Toni Barstis worked with Notre Dame professor of chemistry and biochemistry Marya Lieberman, Notre Dame Duda Family professor of engineering Patrick Flynn and a team of Saint Mary’s researchers to develop a device that detects these ingredients — a device which received the first patent ever awarded to Saint Mary’s.The patent is for a Paper Analytical Device (PAD), a chemically-treated card-like device that can can detect multiple chemical components in a pill or capsule, including substitute drugs or fillers that may be added in place of an active ingredient.The PAD is first treated with reagents, chemicals which help detect the chemical composition of pharmaceuticals. It then is scraped across the suspicious drug and subsequently dipped in water. The water moves up the device and allows the chemicals and the drugs to mix. This reaction produces colors which indicate the composition of the pharmaceutical.Barstis said she was inspired to research the PAD after she audited a fabrication course at Notre Dame.“I simply fell in love with devices,” she said. “I wanted to explore ways to combine my love of chemistry with my new love of fabricating devices, so I reached out to my friend at NDnano, affiliated faculty member Dr. Marya Lieberman. Together, we developed what is now referred to as the ‘PADs Project.’”Receiving a patent for the first time felt “fantastic,” she said.“For me, this was a dream come true.”According to Barstis, the Saint Mary’s team that worked on the PADs project is currently working on two more projects. They are screening over 600 pharmaceutical samples collected in Nepal this past summer and examining a second patent application for the College, which involves a different fabrication and design of a PAD.Tags: PAD, paper analytic device, patent, saint mary’slast_img read more

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Local resident to continue ‘just living’ in midst of Eddy Street Phase II construction

first_imgAlex Daugherty | The Observer Johnnie Johnson brushes off the stoop outside his house, which stands in the middle of the area Notre Dame announced plans to develop in the second phase of construction on the Eddy Street Commons. Johnson refused to sell his property to the University and Indianapolis-based Kite Realty.The property will remain untouched where it sits on the corner of Napoleon Street and North Eddy Street, but his residence will soon be cushioned by newly constructed townhomes and retail space. “This house stays,” Johnson said. “The plan is to build up to me unless something else happens.”Johnson said he knows better than anyone how desired his property is.“I’ve had cash offers from people in Colorado, Florida, Ohio,” he said. “Some are alumni. Some are just plain developers. Sometimes people just send me a postcard: ‘I’ve been trying to get a hold of you for a month and you don’t even call me back. How can we talk?’ And all this stuff, all mad at me.”Notre Dame has offered to buy his property on “several occasions,” Johnson said. He said he shifts back and forth between accepting the offers and refusing to lose his home — which he originally purchased as a tiny room in 1982 and managed to transform into a 2,500 square foot home.“Some days I do, and some days I don’t,” he said. “I think about Florida, and I think about somewhere warmer.”A certain price tag could persuade him to sell, Johnson said.“[It’s] in my head,” he said. “I won’t even tell anybody, but if somebody’s not close to where I want to be, I’ll just pass it on to my son and grandson.”Johnson said his property is the largest privately owned piece of land within a half-mile of Notre Dame Stadium, occupied by him and ten-year-old Tibetan Terrier, Sprocket.Johnson said he would not disclose the exact amount the University offered him.“The money is out there,” he said. “It’s a lot of money. It’s up there.” Notre Dame and Indianapolis-based Kite Realty recently broke ground on the second phase of Eddy Street in December 2017. This phase includes the construction of a grocery store, a revamped Robinson Learning Center, 22 single-family houses, 17 “flex” units, more than 400 new apartments and 8,500 square feet designated to restaurant space, according to Notre Dame News. Despite the ongoing transformation of Eddy Street, one original feature will remain: Johnnie Johnson’s house. Alex Daugherty | The Observer Johnson’s house, which sits on the corner of Napoleon Street and North Eddy Street, will soon be surrounded by construction related to Eddy Street Commons Phase II.Greg Hakanen, director of the Northeast Neighborhood Redevelopment, said in an email the University’s goal was to “find an arrangement that was acceptable to both parties, including making provision for Mr. Johnson to continue to live in the neighborhood if he wished to do so.” “We made several proposals to build him a new residence in the immediate area, but obviously did not reach agreement,” Hakanen said.Johnson has demonstrated commitment to serving the community of homes around him, Hakanen said.“Johnnie Johnson is an institution in the northeast neighborhood,” Hanaken said. “He takes meticulous care of both the house and the grounds. Over the years he extended himself to elderly neighbors, helping them with homeowner tasks that were difficult for them to address. In short, he is a wonderful neighbor, and we are glad to have him in the neighborhood.”Johnson said he has witnessed these neighbors gradually disappear in the last decade as Notre Dame bought up the properties in northeast neighborhood one by one to develop Eddy Street Commons. He said he watched as a new demographic moved into sparkling townhouses where familiar sights and people used to be. “The most obvious change is that people who bought property around here, some don’t even live here in some of those townhouses and just come for the games,” said Johnson, “They’re super, super expensive, so that literally changed the population — the income and the whole bit.” He said he observed a demographic shift.“Basically it’s the money people that moved in,” he said. “We went from literally Rottweilers to fluffy dogs like Sprocket.”Johnson joked that he would consider selling his house in exchange for Maui. He said, though, it’s impossible to put a price on the love and labor that went into his beloved home of 36 years. Johnson’s decision to stay amidst the expansion of Eddy Street is not about the money, he said. “Some girl came up to me and said, ‘You’re a hero. You didn’t sell to Notre Dame,’” Johnson said. “And I said ‘No, I’m not a hero, I’m just living.’”Tags: Eddy Street Commons, eddy street phase ii, Johnnie Johnson, Notre Dame Stadiumlast_img read more

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Muslim Student Association holds annual Islam Awareness Week

first_imgPhoto Courtesy of Muhammad Abubakar Mian Members of the Muslim Student Association pass out hijabs during 2016’s Islam Awareness Week outside DeBartolo Hall as a way of informing students on Muslim practices and creating interreligious dialogue.On Saturday, MSA hosted an Islamophobia Training session, a new addition to the annual Awareness Week. The event focused on bringing awareness to the issue of Islamophobia and promoting and understanding allyship.One of the biggest events of the week is a hijab distribution, which will take place Monday from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Fieldhouse Mall. This event focuses on educating people about the meaning, purpose and history of the hijab.“With the hijab distribution, people can just come by — and obviously there’ll be a couple of Muslims at the stand — and you can start and have a conversation,” he said. “You can ask them questions, get to know one another a little bit, you might even end up making a friend.”The week, which is cosponsored by student government, the Gender Relations Center, Campus Ministry, the Ansari Institute for Global Engagement with Religion and Diversity Council, will continue with previous years’ events including a dinner on Tuesday and a mosque visit on Friday. Thursday’s event will be a halaqa, which is a gathering to discuss religious matters, on the rights of parents.“These are all events that we do every year because they bring so much value,” Mian said.In addition to the traditional events that occur every year, the MSA will be introducing a new event. Wednesday will feature a dessert crawl and cultural night. Mian said the MSA decided to plan this event in an attempt to show — contrary to some common misconceptions — the Muslim world is very diverse.“The culture night is going to be Muslim students on campus from different Muslim countries that will be giving short, fun, five-minute presentations on their country, and that’ll be really exciting,” Mian said. “I think a lot of people will really be surprised by just how much diversity there is to the different Muslim cultures all over the world.”In light of the recent tragedy in New Zealand where 50 people were killed at Friday Prayer, Mian said he hopes Islam Awareness Week will provide a new perspective on recent events and the sacredness and meaning of Friday Prayer in the Islamic tradition.“All of these events provide an opportunity to really understand the weight of the tragedy,” he said. “I think visiting the Mosque might really show people, might shed greater light on the weight of this tragedy given what the Friday Prayer is.”Speaking on the overall goal of Islam Awareness Week, Mian said he hopes Muslims and non-Muslims on campus will grow in community.“As Muslims living in a non-Muslim community, it’s very important that we show people that are members of the non-Muslim community that we’re fully confident that we fully trust in them. Just like we would expect non-Muslims to fully trust and be fully confident in us,” Mian said. “That’s really what we’re trying to accomplish here: exposure to one another. That’s how you build trust in one another. That’s how a non-Muslim grows confidence in his Muslim neighbor, and that’s what we hope to accomplish with Islam Awareness Week.”Tags: Cultural Diversity, Islam, islam awareness week, Muslim Student Association, religion Notre Dame’s Muslim Student Association (MSA) kicked off their annual Islam Awareness Week for 2019 last Saturday. The week is designed to share aspects of the Islamic faith with students across campus, sophomore and MSA president Muhammad Abubakar Mian said.“The main purpose of Islam Awareness Week is really just exposure,” Mian said. “It’s providing an opportunity for the non-Muslim community here on campus to come together with the Muslim community, to start a dialogue or get interacting with one another.”last_img read more

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Office for Student Success helps Belles thrive

first_imgThe Saint Mary’s Office for Student Success is ushering in the fall semester with its Academic Skills & Strategies Workshops starting Wednesday.Diane Fox, director of the Office for Student Success, started the series when the office first opened 10 years ago with the hope to achieve two goals: To help freshman get oriented and help upperclassmen stay motivated, she said.“Nothing is more frustrating than a professor saying to his student, ‘You should have studied more,’” Fox said. “I want to give students specific strategies to provide answers to all their questions about how to be successful in college.”Alexis Fady, a sophomore majoring in business administration with international business and marketing concentrations, began attending the workshops the fall of her first year at Saint Mary’s.“The main reason why I went was because my professors offered extra credit if we attended the workshops but I kept going because of Fox,” Fady said. “She cares about every person who is in that room, whether it’s their first time there or their hundredth. You don’t have to do everything she says and the tips won’t always match your learning style, but there is always someone who benefits from the variety of tips.”Sophomore Lauren Honkamp, a social work major, agreed the main reason she found the workshops so successful was because of Fox’s charismatic approach to student success.“I started attending the sessions because going into my first year, I was really stressed about the transition to college and how to manage my time, split up my homework and study for tests,” she said. “That was just something I felt unprepared for. Fox was the only person I felt comfortable going to and her tips were simple things that you wouldn’t think of initially but which really helped me not get stressed about my workload and get everything done on time.”Fox said she utilizes a variety of methods and strategies in helping students achieve success at the College, even if they don’t know where to start.“Students genuinely want to do well, but they don’t always know how to do well so I am able to give them some tools to achieve their goals,” Fox said. “Giving them different things to do gives them a very concrete way to accomplish what they want.”Fady said she was able to implement the study skills she learned at one of the workshops to prepare for finals.“The workshops are very strategically planned to correspond with what you’re going through in college,” Fady said. “Fox gave us a lot of useful study tips around finals and I really took everything she said to heart, put in a lot of effort, and got high grades on my tests.”The first workshop is titled “Be Ready to Learn,” Fox said.“This first meeting is a preview: What can I get in in 30 minutes which students should have for the first weeks that will help them thereafter?” she said. “It lets students know that we are all in this together and that there are resources available to them. The other sessions are more detailed and more strategy specific.”The sessions will continue through November and will cover topics ranging from time management to preparing for exams. Each workshop takes place twice to maximize accessibility and they are open to anyone who wants to make their academic year a success.Fady said the session was helpful in giving her a foundation for her success.“It was really worth it for me to give just 30 minutes of my time to learn things which are fundamental to succeeding in college and beyond,” Fady said.Tags: Office of Student Success, saint mary’s, successlast_img read more

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California Based Company Expanding Its Operation To Chautauqua County

first_imgShare:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window) Image by the CCIDA.ELLICOTT – A California based designer and manufacturer of architectural systems is expanding from the west coast to Chautauqua County. The County of Chautauqua Industrial Development announced Tuesday that Arktura plans to invest $7.3 million to expand its existing Los Angeles, California-based operations.This new plant is projected to facilitate expedited lead times to the U.S. market for its products, provide local services to east coast markets, and increase its overall production capacity.Arktura plans to hire 50 full-time employees during the first three years of operations. The company is in the process of purchasing a 134,858 sf facility located at 1 Precision Way in the Town of Ellicott, which was previously home to Acu-Rite/Heidenhain.At its February 25, 2020 board meeting, the Board of Directors for the County of Chautauqua Industrial Development unanimously voted in favor of the CCIDA authorizing the execution and delivery of a preliminary agreement with respect to Arktura’s application for financial incentives, which includes: real property tax abatements (PILOT); sales and use tax exemptions; and a mortgage recording tax exemption.Arktura has also applied for benefits/incentives through New York State Empire State Development (ESD) and Office of Community Renewal (OCR).last_img read more

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Jamestown Man Charged In Gerry Home Burglary

first_imgShare:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window) Stock Image.GERRY — A Jamestown man has been charged following investigation into a May burglary at an vacant residence in the Town of Gerry.Chautauqua County Sheriff’s Deputies have charged Randall K. Mesler Jr., 21, of Jamestown, with third-degree burglary and petit larceny following an investigation.Mesler was issued appearance tickets and is to appear in Town of Gerry Court at a later date.last_img read more

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