Newspaper editor released on bail after 24 hours

first_imgNews Photo : Philimon Bulawayo/Reuters ZimbabweAfrica September 1, 2020 Find out more News RSF_en News Receive email alerts Follow the news on Zimbabwe Organisation Reports to go further ZimbabweAfrica Help by sharing this information Zimbabwean court must free imprisoned journalist who is unwell November 27, 2020 Find out more Zimbabwean journalist Hopewell Chin’ono denied bail December 1, 2010 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Newspaper editor released on bail after 24 hours November 12, 2020 Find out more The 2020 pandemic has challenged press freedom in Africa Reporters Without Borders hails today’s release of The Standard editor Nevanji Madanhire after he had been detained for about 24 hours in Harare’s Rhodesville police station.He was freed on bail of 100 U.S. dollars by judge Don Ndirowei, who ordered an investigation into a complaint by Madanhire’s lawyer, Chris Mhike, about the length of Madanhire’s detention.Mhike said the police had violated a basic right by holding his client for so long after he turned himself in. “It seems that the dark times of human rights violations are back,” he said. “I urge the judicial authorities to investigation.Reporters Without Borders supports Mhike’s statements and appeals to the authorities to call the police to order.——————————————————01-12-10- Newspaper editor arrested in Harare, shortwave radio sets seized in rural areas- Reporters Without Borders is very disturbed by yesterday’s arrest of Nevanji Madanhire, the editor of the Harare-based weekly The Standard, and calls for his immediate release.The press freedom organization condemns the threatening methods being used by the police and the climate of fear they have created for Zimbabwean journalists. We regret that freedom of opinion is being gagged in this manner in the run-up to next year’s elections and at a time when President Robert Mugabe has made it clear he wants to put an end to the coalition government.Madanhire’s arrest came four days after his correspondent in the southwestern city of Bulawayo, Nqobani Ndlovu, was freed at a judge’s behest from Khami prison, where he had been held for nine days. An earlier Reporters Without Borders release condemned Ndlovu’s arrest on 17 November for an article questioning the probity of the local police .The Harare police initially tried to arrest Madanhire on 29 November, when they went with a warrant to Alpha Media Holdings, the company that owns The Standard, but Madanhire, who had been in hiding for the previous 10 days, was not there.Accompanied by his lawyer, he turned himself into the police the next day and is now held at Rhodesville police station in Harare, where he is being questioned by members of the “Law and Order” section of the Criminal Investigation Department.Reporters Without Borders has also learned that the police in rural areas have for some time been confiscating shortwave radio sets from people caught listening to programmes made by Zimbabwean journalists in exile. The press freedom organization firmly condemns the use of such methods to censor information and restrict individual freedom. They must stop at once, and the sets must be returned to their owners.NGOs recently distributed shortwave radio sets to rural residents to enable them to receive alternative radio programmes broadcast from abroad. Studio 7, Radio VOP (Voice of the People) and Shortwave Radio Africa – broadcast from Washington, South Africa and London, respectively – have around 1 million listeners. Studio 7 contributed to the distribution of radio sets so that people could listen to something other than the pro-government Zimbabwe Broadcasting Corporation (ZBC).Five homes in Bikita West, in the province of Masvingo, were raided on 25 November and radio sets were seized. Norbert Chinyike and Charles Mhizha, two supporters of the Movement for Democratic Change (the former opposition party currently in a shaky coalition with Mugabe’s ZANU-PF), were arrested after radio sets were found in their possession. They were later released without being charged.Shortly before that, police searched the offices of the NGO Democratic Councils Forum in Gweru and arrested an employee after discovering radio sets that were awaiting distribution in the countryside.Jastone Mazhale, the president of the Gwanda Agenda pressure group, said police inspected his offices and questioned him about radio sets. He said they told him they were acting on orders from police headquarters in Harare.Radio sets that been distributed to rural residents by NGOs were seized by police in Mashonaland East on 27 October.A representative of the human rights group ZimRights said police accompanied by members of the Central Intelligence Organisation (CIO) carried out an operation in Murehwa district, confiscating radio sets that had been distributed by NGOs and threatening the residents who were found with them.National police spokesman Wayne Bvudzijena said he was unaware of such incidents but promised to make enquiries.“We condemn this large-scale censorship campaign being carried out in rural areas of the country where access to news is already limited and where the authorities deliberately try to keep the media presence to a minimum,” Reporters Without Borders secretary-general Jean-François Julliard said. “These measures are designed to limit the population’s access to freely-reported news and to ensure that the views expressed by pro-government media are not challenged by the views of independent and opposition media,” Julliard added. “This is an attack on media diversity.”last_img read more

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Dodgers rookie Alex Verdugo talks hitting, his walkup music and relearning Spanish

first_imgSome items that didn’t make the column from my conversation with Alex Verdugo but were too good to leave out as we discussed hitting, his popular walkup music – “Volver Volver” by Vicente Fernandez – and his, to now, limited grasp of Spanish:Q: It’s one of things when we’re talking to Doc (Dave Roberts) here in the dugout. I asked him, ‘What has impressed you most, what do you like most about Alex?’ And that was the thing he said, that consistency of approach and that consistency of concentration.A: Yeah. Just it’s just like I said it’s one of those things. You know I’m not trying to hit a home run up there. My perfect swing and perfect outcome is a line drive, you know. So no matter where I hit it – line drive to left, center, right, or you know even if it’s at somebody – that’s what I went up there to do. I went up there to hit the ball hard, put the barrel on it, and you know the rest happens. Sometimes you miss under it a little bit and get a homer, sometimes you’re on top of it and hit a hard ground ball.Q: Home runs are flukes sometimes. Newsroom GuidelinesNews TipsContact UsReport an Error Q: From when you first started playing regularly. Are you noticing that there are different patterns?A: I think every team has a different thing that they do. And some teams they want to come in, some teams they want to stay away and and play the up-and-down game. So really for me, it’s just not really mind like where they’re trying to throw me necessarily, just try to get a strike. I want to get the ball in the zone, and you know if the ball is in the strike zone, I feel like I have a pretty good chance of hitting it hard or putting it in play.—Q: And then I guess the walkup music kind of gets the energy going, too. What was behind that?A: It really is something I grew up listening to with my dad. You know, he was Mexican. So just every time he picked me up from school, or he’s cleaning the house, at home, he’s blasting Mexican music and a lot of Vicente for sure. So for me it’s just something I wanted to kind of have as my walkup because it reminds me of being home and with my dad. So it’s something that kind of like relaxes me, and obviously L.A. and the fan base here has taken over and really loved it and reacted amazing to it.Q: And yet you don’t speak Spanish.A: No, no, no, no, no. My dad does, though.Q: Was it the sort of deal where you were taking it in school and it just wasn’t taking? That’s how I felt: I took four years of Spanish and didn’t retain any.A: So when I was younger, my parents would work and then my tia would pick me up and she’d babysit me, and you know she would talk Spanish to me and that’s when I started really talking and I knew more. And then we ended up moving from there to the east side of Tucson, which is just a different area, so (I) kind of like lost the speaking Spanish. At least there every day I was speaking Spanish with her because she was trying to speak Spanish to me. And then once I moved it was kind of like, I got into that mindset. I was like, man, like even if my dad talked in Spanish, I wouldn’t answer. I’d answer in English or something. I think once we moved we kind of like lost it and just … I really didn’t think about speaking Spanish. I was like, my dad speaks it so we’re all right, you know. But yeah, that’s one of the biggest things I wish I would have stuck with and kind of kept going. But it’s never too late. So you know I’m sure I’ll learn and be fluent.Q: And you probably have enough guys in this clubhouse that can help you.A: Yeah, definitely for sure. Once I get a good grasp of it, I’ll be able to use the passive conversations with them and kind of walk my way through some stuff.center_img A: Yeah, for certain people like me I think they’re flukes, kind of just happen, you know, just with being consistent and hitting the ball hard. I think with Belly (Cody Bellinger) and a couple other guys, those aren’t flukes. When they swing the bat, they swing the bat with a purpose and that’s to drive the ball out of the park.Q: Have you ever been tempted to change your swing or tweak your swing, to say, ‘OK, I’m going to try and get the ball in the air,’ or have you been able to pretty much stay with what you’ve got?A: Yeah, it’s really just been stay with what I have. I think now I’m kind of learning when to take my shot early in the counts or when I’m ahead. You know, just take my shot for trying to drive the ball a little bit further, and then after that if I miss it, then you know kind of zone it back up to just hitting line drives.Q: Are guys pitching you differently?A: As in, from what?last_img read more

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Wellington police notes: Wednesday, August 14, 2013

first_imgWellington Police notes for Wednesday, August 14, 2013•2:50 p.m. Wanda Gray, 42, Wellington was issued a notice to appear charged with dog at large, no current rabies vaccinations and no Wellington registration.•12:43 p.m. Officers investigated burglary, theft and criminal damage to Property in the 900 block. N. Woodlawn, Wellington.•3:45 p.m. Non-Injury accident in the 1200 block S. A, Wellington involving vehicles operated by juvenile female, 17, Wellington and Ralph C. Dry, 70, Wellington.•6:02 p.m. Officers investigated a battery in the 900 block W. 7th, Wellington.•9:23 p.m. Officers investigated a theft by a known suspect in the 2000 block. E. 16th, Wellington.•10:12 p.m. Lana J. Purkey, 43, Wellington, was arrested on a city of Wellington bench warrant for failure to appear.•10:12 p.m. Lana J. Purkey, 43, Wellington, was arrested on a city of Wellington bench warrant for failure to appear.•10:25 p.m. Officers took a report of suspicious activity in the 1100 block. E. 16th, Wellington.last_img read more

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$5.9-Million Programme Launched to Boost School Attendance by PATH Beneficiaries

first_img Speaking at the launch on Thursday (February 8) in Port Maria, St. Mary, Minister of Labour and Social Security, Hon. Shahine Robinson, informed that $4 million will be spent during the first year of the programme and another $1.9 million in the second year. The Government has launched a $5.9-million incentive programme aimed at increasing secondary-school attendance by students benefiting under the Programme of Advancement Through Health and Education (PATH). It will offer a range of cash and non-cash incentives to parents and schools to boost student turnout. Story Highlights The Government has launched a $5.9-million incentive programme aimed at increasing secondary-school attendance by students benefiting under the Programme of Advancement Through Health and Education (PATH).Dubbed ‘School Days Count’, the two-year initiative will roll out between February and April in 34 institutions that have below-70 per cent attendance levels.It will offer a range of cash and non-cash incentives to parents and schools to boost student turnout.These include 10 scholarships, each valued at $250,000, to students who will be starting tertiary studies in September 2018.Speaking at the launch on Thursday (February 8) in Port Maria, St. Mary, Minister of Labour and Social Security, Hon. Shahine Robinson, informed that $4 million will be spent during the first year of the programme and another $1.9 million in the second year.She informed that through the initiative, “we hope to accomplish a dramatic shift in attitudes, so that PATH beneficiaries and the rest of the school population will be motivated to attend school, one hundred per cent of the time”.“Also, it is seeking to give more exposure to post-secondary education and career options provided via PATH and the Steps-to-Work programme, while… rewarding students with tangible encouragements to attend school with regularity,” she added.She noted that as part of the initiative, a public education campaign will be undertaken geared at creating awareness among parents and students about the importance of attending school consistently, by demonstrating the correlation between absent days and lessons lost.Minister Robinson said the Government is committed to ensuring that children have a fair chance of achieving their full potential “so they can make a meaningful contribution to nation-building and economic growth”.She thanked the PATH donors for their support in “helping us reach our vulnerable and at-risk populations”.PATH is an initiative by the Government of Jamaica with support from donor partners such as the World Bank, Inter-American Development Bank and other multilateral and bilateral agencies.It is aimed at delivering benefits by way of cash grants to the poorest and most vulnerable persons in the society.The programme is administrated by the Ministry of Labour and Social Security, and the main objectives are to increase educational attainment and improve health outcomes of the poor, break the intergenerational cycle of poverty, reduce child labour by requiring children to have minimum attendance in school, and serve as a safety net by preventing families from falling further into poverty in the event of adverse shock.last_img read more

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