Pensions and public sector dominate in TUC debates

first_imgPensions and public sector dominate in TUC debatesOn 21 Sep 2004 in Personnel Today Comments are closed. Previous Article Next Article Pensions,equal pay and public sector issues dominated the 136th Trades Union Congress,held last week in Brighton.AlanJohnson, the new secretary of state for work and pensions and a former tradeunion leader, announced that employees were to be given more power to control company pensions schemes.Hetold the TUC that the Government would create powers to ensure half of pensionscheme trustees were nominated by members of that scheme. At present the levelis a third.Aftermonths of speculation, Johnson admitted that ministers had no immediate plansto raise the state pensionage.TUCgeneral secretary Brendan Barber welcomed the Government’s pensionannouncement and claimed it as “another victory for people at work”.The TUC called for compulsory contributions from employers and for the linkbetween the state pension and average earnings to berestored.Meanwhile,Mark Serwotka, generalsecretary of the Public and Commercial Services (PCS) union, won a standingovation when he described government plans to cut 104,000 Civil Service jobs as”disgraceful butchery”.Serwotka warned the Governmentthat it was leaving itself with too few staff to carry out services and”doing a British Airways”. The TUC voted to carry out co-ordinatedcampaigns and linking up on industrial action. The PCS will ballot for anational strike on 5 November.Prospect,the union representing professional workers damned the Government for “dumbing down” the CivilService and said there was a steady haemorrhaging of professional talent in theservice, particularly in scientific and technical expertise.TheNHS also came under scrutiny, with TUC delegates asked to condemn theintroduction of performance related pay (PRP).Publicsector pay came under fire, when Heather Wakefield, national secretary forlocal government at Unison, revealed that there were 300,000 part-time localgovernment employees earning less than £6 an hour. “Twentyper cent of the workforce is living on poverty wages,” she told a fringeevent on skills pathways, held by the Employers Organisation. By Penny Wilson Related posts:No related photos.last_img read more

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More Oxford graduates are waiters than engineers

first_imgHowever, Susanna Elliott, an Orien­tal Studies student from Mansfield, commented, “I’m not particularly worried about my employment pros­pects – which degrees are most val­ued come and go in phases. Having a good degree from Oxford, in what­ever subject, is still a solid basis for gaining employment.” Joshua Felberg, another Mansfield student reading Oriental Studies, commented, “While I am confident about my prospects in the future, I am worried that this disparity be­tween colleges comes down to nep­otism within other colleges. An Oxford degree should be worth the same whatever college it is from.” According to the report, science undergraduate students were the best paid, with materials scien­tists claiming an average salary of £35,300. Those who graduated from the English Faculty were the worst paid, with an average salary of £18,700. Univ English student, Louise Car­ey, commented, “I’m taking this de­gree because I love the subject rather than because I think it will land me a great job. I find English fascinating and rewarding so I wouldn’t say it’s been useless to me. If I’d wanted to maximise my employability I would have taken PPE or something.” Keble undergraduates had an av­erage salary of £35,900 six months after leaving, whereas those who graduated from Wadham were paid an average of £20,700. The college with the most students going on to further study is Merton, at 54.3 per cent. New College had the highest percentage of undergraduates find­ing employment, with 59.6 per cent of all students securing a job six months after leaving. The largest employer of Oxford students is the NHS, which employed 281 graduates over the last three years. Oxford University employed 266 six months after their gradua­tion. Thereafter, the major employ­ers are financial services firms such as Deloitte, PwC and Deutsche Bank.  The University has published statistics on graduate employment which reveal that, six months after graduating, more people worked as waiters or bar staff than worked as mechanical or civil engineers. Of the students who replied to the sur­vey, 49.5 per cent were in work only, six per cent in study and work, and 31.8 per cent in study only, with 5.9 per cent unemployed. In comparison, the most recent figures suggest that the national graduate un­employment rate is currently 20 per cent while the general national rate is 8.4.Will Heard who graduated from Jesus in 2010 commented, “Oxford graduate un­employment is only just below unemploy­ment rate in the UK. Shocking.”The director of the Oxford University Careers Service, Jonathan Black, told Cher­well that one reason for a lower unemploy­ment rate than the national average is that Oxford students are a “Highly desirable group of people, sought out by employers. They have fabulous transferable skills.” However, Black added that employers, “Do mark Oxford students down on team­work and business awareness.” Emily Jamieson, a 2010 history graduate from Jesus, commented, “At other univer­sities far fewer people are going to choose to keep on studying, or even have the op­tion available to them. So the fact Oxford has low unemployment is maybe more a reflection of people carrying on study than being able to go straight out and find work.”Those studying medical sciences were most likely to find a job six months after leaving university, with only 2.2 per cent of them unemployed, none of whom were undergraduate medics. In the humanities, this figure jumps up to 7.8 per cent, with 13 per cent of graduates from the Oriental Studies Faculty unemployed.While Magdalen had only 2.4 per cent of students claiming to be unemployed, Mansfield has the highest unemployment rate of 10 per cent. 40 per cent of those with under­graduate degrees earned less than the student loan repayment thresh­old of £21,000. Considering graduates of both graduate and non-graduate degrees, 51 per cent of humanities students were paid less than this figure, whereas only 15 per cent of the Medi­cal Sciences division had a salary less than this. The figures also highlighted a sig­nificant gender divide in salary lev­els. In the Social Sciences, 62 per cent of male undergraduate students earn the median wage of £24,500, whereas only 37 per cent of female students earn that amount sixth months after graduating. Marta Szczerba, a 2011 PPE gradu­ate from St John’s, and now a man­agement consultant, claimed that there was “a definite advantage” from studying at Oxford. She as­serted that many companies only visit Oxbridge, LSE and Imperial so students from those universities are much more likely to be employed in those services. She also said that an Oxford education was a “signal” to employers, making Oxford students “more credible candidates”. She added, “I think the job situa­tion was much better for those in my year who got a job in third year, even for industries such as banking and management consultancy. Those of my friends who did not find work in third year are finding it a lot harder to get a job now.” Matthew Robinson, a 2008 Law graduate who was employed by McKinsey after leaving Oxford and then co-founded a technology com­pany, commented, “I think Oxford graduates have the same level of workplace-related skills as other graduates. However, it does give a huge advantage in how employers perceive you. “There is an increasing value in technology skills which make busi­nesses more efficient, and degrees which give these skills or rigorous maths-based skills are more valu­able. The exception to this is PPE, which employers believe gives a suit­ably broad skill-set.” Oliver Moody, a journalist who graduated last year from St Anne’s, said, “I think it is easier for Oxford students to find jobs – as long as they focus. If you know what you want to do, build up a half-decent CV and think hard about where you want to go after university. You can make an Oxford degree work for you.” However he continued, “There were a lot of people who just assumed that an Oxford degree would magi­cally confer a perfect, well-paid job without any real effort or thought. They didn’t do so well. There are a lot of hungry, focused students at less prestigious universities who are serious competitors in the market­place, and, as employers are increas­ingly looking for the finished article, they have the edge over Oxford stu­dents who don’t get around to look­ing beyond university. He added, “Of my friends from Oxford, about half have just started white-collar professional jobs, and the other half are still living with their parents.”last_img read more

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Lionel Messi Told Me to Shut My Mouth, Alleges Brazil Coach Tite But Argentine Star Has the Last Laugh

first_img argentinabanBrazillionel messi First Published: November 16, 2019, 12:33 PM IST Argentina captain Lionel Messi and Brazil coach Tite exchanged words during the clash between the South American giants on Friday but it was the forward who had the last laugh after his team’s good run continued with a 1-0 win in Saudi Arabia.Messi looked to the touchline and put his fingers to his lips before making another hand sign that appeared to tell the Brazil coach he had too much to say for himself. Tite admitted he had been complaining to the referee during the first half and said the two men exchanged words.”I complained because he (Messi) should have been shown a yellow card and he told me to shut my mouth and I told him to shut his mouth,” Tite said. “And that was it.” #Messi asked Tite (Brazil’s coach) to be quiet ????OMG, what happened to the ??!??pic.twitter.com/2WGHS96hT0— ????? ???? | ? SZN (@Everyone_heart) November 16, 2019The Brazil coach played down the incident and highlighted Messi’s performance in the well-deserved friendly victory.The Barcelona forward was one of the outstanding performers for Argentina on his return to international football after missing four games through suspension.He scored the only goal after 14 minutes – his penalty was saved but he followed up to beat Alisson – and could have had another couple of goals but for some stout defending and the keeper’s awareness.The result was encouraging for Argentina, who have now gone six games without defeat – their longest such run since 2016.”From the very start we tried to play. We had a couple of misses and they had their chances,” Messi said. “But in the second half we were much better.”When you win, it puts you more at ease and that is very positive for what lies ahead. I ended the match well, we all ran quite a bit. And that is what we were there to do.”Argentina play Uruguay in a friendly next week while Brazil face South Korea. center_img Get the best of News18 delivered to your inbox – subscribe to News18 Daybreak. Follow News18.com on Twitter, Instagram, Facebook, Telegram, TikTok and on YouTube, and stay in the know with what’s happening in the world around you – in real time.last_img read more

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