Muslim Student Association holds annual Islam Awareness Week

first_imgPhoto Courtesy of Muhammad Abubakar Mian Members of the Muslim Student Association pass out hijabs during 2016’s Islam Awareness Week outside DeBartolo Hall as a way of informing students on Muslim practices and creating interreligious dialogue.On Saturday, MSA hosted an Islamophobia Training session, a new addition to the annual Awareness Week. The event focused on bringing awareness to the issue of Islamophobia and promoting and understanding allyship.One of the biggest events of the week is a hijab distribution, which will take place Monday from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Fieldhouse Mall. This event focuses on educating people about the meaning, purpose and history of the hijab.“With the hijab distribution, people can just come by — and obviously there’ll be a couple of Muslims at the stand — and you can start and have a conversation,” he said. “You can ask them questions, get to know one another a little bit, you might even end up making a friend.”The week, which is cosponsored by student government, the Gender Relations Center, Campus Ministry, the Ansari Institute for Global Engagement with Religion and Diversity Council, will continue with previous years’ events including a dinner on Tuesday and a mosque visit on Friday. Thursday’s event will be a halaqa, which is a gathering to discuss religious matters, on the rights of parents.“These are all events that we do every year because they bring so much value,” Mian said.In addition to the traditional events that occur every year, the MSA will be introducing a new event. Wednesday will feature a dessert crawl and cultural night. Mian said the MSA decided to plan this event in an attempt to show — contrary to some common misconceptions — the Muslim world is very diverse.“The culture night is going to be Muslim students on campus from different Muslim countries that will be giving short, fun, five-minute presentations on their country, and that’ll be really exciting,” Mian said. “I think a lot of people will really be surprised by just how much diversity there is to the different Muslim cultures all over the world.”In light of the recent tragedy in New Zealand where 50 people were killed at Friday Prayer, Mian said he hopes Islam Awareness Week will provide a new perspective on recent events and the sacredness and meaning of Friday Prayer in the Islamic tradition.“All of these events provide an opportunity to really understand the weight of the tragedy,” he said. “I think visiting the Mosque might really show people, might shed greater light on the weight of this tragedy given what the Friday Prayer is.”Speaking on the overall goal of Islam Awareness Week, Mian said he hopes Muslims and non-Muslims on campus will grow in community.“As Muslims living in a non-Muslim community, it’s very important that we show people that are members of the non-Muslim community that we’re fully confident that we fully trust in them. Just like we would expect non-Muslims to fully trust and be fully confident in us,” Mian said. “That’s really what we’re trying to accomplish here: exposure to one another. That’s how you build trust in one another. That’s how a non-Muslim grows confidence in his Muslim neighbor, and that’s what we hope to accomplish with Islam Awareness Week.”Tags: Cultural Diversity, Islam, islam awareness week, Muslim Student Association, religion Notre Dame’s Muslim Student Association (MSA) kicked off their annual Islam Awareness Week for 2019 last Saturday. The week is designed to share aspects of the Islamic faith with students across campus, sophomore and MSA president Muhammad Abubakar Mian said.“The main purpose of Islam Awareness Week is really just exposure,” Mian said. “It’s providing an opportunity for the non-Muslim community here on campus to come together with the Muslim community, to start a dialogue or get interacting with one another.”last_img read more

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Office for Student Success helps Belles thrive

first_imgThe Saint Mary’s Office for Student Success is ushering in the fall semester with its Academic Skills & Strategies Workshops starting Wednesday.Diane Fox, director of the Office for Student Success, started the series when the office first opened 10 years ago with the hope to achieve two goals: To help freshman get oriented and help upperclassmen stay motivated, she said.“Nothing is more frustrating than a professor saying to his student, ‘You should have studied more,’” Fox said. “I want to give students specific strategies to provide answers to all their questions about how to be successful in college.”Alexis Fady, a sophomore majoring in business administration with international business and marketing concentrations, began attending the workshops the fall of her first year at Saint Mary’s.“The main reason why I went was because my professors offered extra credit if we attended the workshops but I kept going because of Fox,” Fady said. “She cares about every person who is in that room, whether it’s their first time there or their hundredth. You don’t have to do everything she says and the tips won’t always match your learning style, but there is always someone who benefits from the variety of tips.”Sophomore Lauren Honkamp, a social work major, agreed the main reason she found the workshops so successful was because of Fox’s charismatic approach to student success.“I started attending the sessions because going into my first year, I was really stressed about the transition to college and how to manage my time, split up my homework and study for tests,” she said. “That was just something I felt unprepared for. Fox was the only person I felt comfortable going to and her tips were simple things that you wouldn’t think of initially but which really helped me not get stressed about my workload and get everything done on time.”Fox said she utilizes a variety of methods and strategies in helping students achieve success at the College, even if they don’t know where to start.“Students genuinely want to do well, but they don’t always know how to do well so I am able to give them some tools to achieve their goals,” Fox said. “Giving them different things to do gives them a very concrete way to accomplish what they want.”Fady said she was able to implement the study skills she learned at one of the workshops to prepare for finals.“The workshops are very strategically planned to correspond with what you’re going through in college,” Fady said. “Fox gave us a lot of useful study tips around finals and I really took everything she said to heart, put in a lot of effort, and got high grades on my tests.”The first workshop is titled “Be Ready to Learn,” Fox said.“This first meeting is a preview: What can I get in in 30 minutes which students should have for the first weeks that will help them thereafter?” she said. “It lets students know that we are all in this together and that there are resources available to them. The other sessions are more detailed and more strategy specific.”The sessions will continue through November and will cover topics ranging from time management to preparing for exams. Each workshop takes place twice to maximize accessibility and they are open to anyone who wants to make their academic year a success.Fady said the session was helpful in giving her a foundation for her success.“It was really worth it for me to give just 30 minutes of my time to learn things which are fundamental to succeeding in college and beyond,” Fady said.Tags: Office of Student Success, saint mary’s, successlast_img read more

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Caribbean requests more support to face natural disasters and crises

first_img Tweet Share Sharing is caring! NewsRegional Caribbean requests more support to face natural disasters and crises by: – March 21, 2012 Sharecenter_img 12 Views   no discussions Share Photo credit: smartcampaign.orgMONTEVIDEO, Uruguay — Representatives of Latin American and Caribbean countries have raised the need to arm the Inter-American Development Bank with flexible financial instruments to help them hedge against natural disasters and possible economic downturns.The calls were issued on Monday during the annual meeting of the IDB Board of Governors. Composed of representatives from 48 member countries, the Board is the Bank’s top policymaking body. Governors are finance ministers, central bankers and other government authorities.Uruguayan Finance Minister Fernando Lorenzo, who was elected chairman of the board of governors, said that the recent capital increase has put the IDB in a better position to support its 26 borrowing member countries in Latin America and the Caribbean.However, Lorenzo added, the region’s governments also need hedging instruments such as contingent credit lines in anticipation of emergencies such as those triggered by natural disasters or contagion from international financial crises.“The region’s countries today need a stronger IDB, more active and creative in developing new tools,” said Lorenzo, who emphasized that Latin America and the Caribbean still faces great challenges in reducing inequality, a vulnerability of their countries.“In the past insufficient funding was the main cause of dysfunction in national policies and (…) in instances when it was necessary to carry out painful, excruciating adjustments, with extremely negative social consequences for region,” he said. “Therefore, the IDB and other regional institutions do well in offering us more and better tools to address such contingencies.”IDB president Luis Alberto Moreno thanked the board of governors for its vote of confidence in completing the recent capital increase — the largest in its history — which raised the authorized capital to $171 billion.“I take this opportunity to thank you for your acknowledgement of the work done by the Bank to meet all mandates of the 9th general capital Increase,” said Moreno, who highlighted the significant progress made in areas such as development effectiveness, transparency and accountability, risk management and financial management.“However, building a more solid and effective institution is an ongoing process of strengthening and learning. The Bank will continue working to ensure that the goals of this agenda are achieved, “said Moreno.Regarding the prospects for Latin America and the Caribbean, Moreno noted its economies’ good performance, with they have sustained despite the uncertain global context. The region today is recognized for its dynamism and its opportunities, he said. Over the past decade, more than 50 million people were lifted out of poverty and the middle class expanded substantially.However, those achievements could be threatened by crises sparked in other parts of the world. On the eve of the annual meeting, the IDB issued a report on the potential impact on Latin America and the Caribbean of risks such as a deepening of the European debt crisis or a sharp slowdown in China’s economy. A recovery is underway in the United States, but unemployment, the fiscal deficit and public debt remain at high levels.The report, “A World of Forking Paths”, stated that while a majority of Latin American and Caribbean countries remain relatively resistant to a global economic slowdown, they now have less room for fiscal stimulus measures to cushion the impact of a crisis.To meet its borrowing countries’ requirements, Moreno said the IDB will explore the creation of new flexible and temporary financial instruments that could help governments at times when they have to deploy countercyclical policies. Such mechanisms could be particularly helpful for small and vulnerable economies in the region.The Montevideo meeting also provided a framework for analyzing the participation of Latin American and Caribbean countries in other major international forums scheduled to be held in the region in June, such as the Rio+20 UN Conference on Sustainable Development, which will take place in Rio de Janeiro, and the G20 Leaders Summit in Los Cabos, which will be chaired by Mexico.Haiti, initiatives and agreementsRatifying the IDB’s commitment to Haiti’s reconstruction, the board of governors approved a $200 million transfer to a fund that provides grants to the Caribbean nation. Since the 2010 earthquake, the IDB has approved more than $442 million for infrastructure, energy, agriculture, water and sanitation, education and private sector development projects in Haiti.The IDB also presented an initiative on citizen security, one of the biggest concerns of in the region, which has the highest murder rate in the world. In order to assist its borrowing member countries, the Bank will establish a technical assistance focused on sharing the lessons learned from successful experiences in crime and violence prevention.In terms of accountability and focus on results, IDB executive vice president Julie Katzman presented MapAmericas. This innovative digital mapping platform will provide information on projects funded by the Bank in Latin America and the Caribbean. The platform will also serve as a tool to facilitate collaboration between the IDB and executing agencies in borrowing countries.As part of its work with civil society, the IDB held a meeting with 250 representatives from more than 100 non-governmental organizations to discuss how they can collaborate more effectively with the Bank and governments to promote sustainable development in the region. This work will be carried out by the civil society councils the IDB has established in each of its 26 borrowing countries.Private sector development is a priority in the IDB’s agenda. During the annual meeting it organized seminars on promoting small and medium-size enterprises, public-private partnerships in infrastructure projects and basic services, as well as on the development of logistics infrastructure and services to boost competitiveness.Cooperation with Asia, a region with growing ties to Latin America and the Caribbean, is another area of work for the IDB. During the annual meeting, the Bank presented details of a $1 billion investment platform in partnership with China Eximbank to finance private sector projects in this region.The IDB also signed an agreement with the Japanese International Cooperation Agency to fund up to $600 million in renewable energy projects in Central America and the Caribbean and another agreement with Korea for the creation of a $40 million trust fund for public sector modernization. The IDB also announced it is preparing a study with the Asian Development Bank on how to deepen economic ties, trade and technical cooperation between Latin America and the Caribbean and Asia, the most dynamic regions of the world.The IDB also organized youth-focused activities in Montevideo, featuring discussions on promoting youth development through sport, culture and technology; more effective job training programs; and problems facing secondary education in the region to prepare young people to join the labor market. This last topic was analyzed in depth in a recent Bank report, “Disconnected: Skills, Education and Employment in Latin America.”The IDB and the Uruguayan Central Bank (BCU) paid tribute to Enrique Iglesias, the BCU’s first president and third president of the IDB, between 1988 and 2005.The IDB’s next annual meeting will be held in March 2013 in Panama City, by invitation of the Panamanian government.Caribbean News Nowlast_img read more

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The Final Word: Beat writers discuss Syracuse’s 86-72 loss to Oklahoma State

first_img Comments BROOKLYN — Syracuse traveled to the Barclays Center on Wednesday night for its first of two games in New York City. It allowed the first 11 points of the game, and despite leading by seven at one point in the first half, the Orange (4-2, 0-1 Atlantic C0ast) struggled defensively in an 86-72 loss to Oklahoma State (6-0). OSU outshot the Orange and dominated the interior as SU’s frontcourt struggled with foul trouble.Here’s what our beat writers had to say about the Orange’s loss. Published on November 27, 2019 at 11:46 pmcenter_img Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more

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