Pasadena School Board to Hear Plans for ‘Controversial’ Solar Power Plan

first_img Name (required)  Mail (required) (not be published)  Website  Community News Business News Pasadena Will Allow Vaccinated People to Go Without Masks in Most Settings Starting on Tuesday Subscribe Plans for a “controversial” District-wide PUSD solar power project will be heard by the Board of Education Thursday.According to a PUSD agenda report, the project envisions district power expenditure savings of up to $17 million over the length of the 25-year contract.“It’s such a long-term commitment,” said Board member Scott Phelps Wednesday. “It’s such an unknown, I guess that’s why it’s controversial. We don’t know what the power rate will be. We’re doing it because there’s an estimate that they will increase, and so we locked in lower rates.”PUSD signed a Power Purchase Agreement (PPA) with PFMG Solar in 2018 for construction and operation of the PUSD solar project. PFMG has since been sold to Constellation, a subsidiary of Exelon, which owns six utility companies across the US.Under the PPA, PUSD will not spend any funds from project inception to completion; additionally, there will be no maintenance costs for the next 25 years.The school district shall pay a reduced rate of energy costs, approximately $.05 or less per kilowatt-hour. Over 60 percent of PUSD’s electricity requirements can be supplied by solar power, resulting in large power savings, the PUSD said.According to spokesperson Dave Snyder of Constellation, the rate is 5 cents per kW/h less than they would otherwise pay if they were purchasing energy from the utility.Phelps added, “We just don’t know what will happen over 25 years. Long-term power contracts remind me too much of what happened to the State of California during the games Enron and others were playing.”According to a January 2020 U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) report, “The EIA expects that wholesale electricity prices in many areas of the country in 2020 will be lower than last year, reflecting the lower costs for natural gas as a fuel for power generation.”The report also forecast that wholesale prices in the Southwest will rise 5% in 2020, as a result of the recent retirement of some coal-fired generating units. In 2021, EIA expects that “wholesale power prices will increase in most areas, as a result of an expected 9% increase in the cost of natural gas.”EIA also forecast that the U.S. retail price for the residential sector will average 1 cents/KWhh (kilowatt hours) in 2020, which is 1.2% higher than the average retail price in 2019. Forecast residential prices will increase by an additional 1.2% in 2021, said the report.Phelps said he didn’t know whether or not the agreement was a “bad idea.”“I just don’t like a lack of flexibility,” he said, adding, “Then again, we have to pay whatever we are charged now by Pasadena Department of Water and Power and Edison so maybe it’s not any worse.”According to Phelps, a number of Southern California school districts have solar panels in parking lots. Those districts may have purchased the equipment with school bonds, he said.According to the District agenda report, construction of the solar panels under Phase 1 is slated to begin this month, at no cost to PUSD nor to the City of Pasadena. The first phase will include installation at Coombs Elementary School, John Muir HS, Cleveland ES, Don Benito FS, Hamilton ES, and McKinley, with completion expected by the end of June.The second phase of the project, will begin construction in February, with completion expected around July or August. Phase 2 will include installation work at Rose City High School, Field ES, Longfellow ES, Madison ES, Sierra Madre MS, Washington STEAM, and Blair HS. Completion of Phase 2 is expected in July or August.Phase 3 and Phase 4 of the project begin construction later, with the latest completion date around December 2020. In all, 28 PUSD campuses will have solar power plants, upon the completion of the project.The Board of Education meeting begins at 4:30 p.m. at PUSD Headquarters, at 351 S. Hudson Ave., Pasadena. More Cool Stuff 8 recommendedShareShareTweetSharePin it Uncategorized Pasadena School Board to Hear Plans for ‘Controversial’ Solar Power Plan District-wide plan will lock in energy rates for 25 years By EDDIE RIVERA, Community Editor Published on Thursday, January 30, 2020 | 5:07 am EVENTS & ENTERTAINMENT | FOOD & DRINK | THE ARTS | REAL ESTATE | HOME & GARDEN | WELLNESS | SOCIAL SCENE | GETAWAYS | PARENTS & KIDS faithfernandez More » ShareTweetShare on Google+Pin on PinterestSend with WhatsApp,Virtual Schools PasadenaHomes Solve Community/Gov/Pub SafetyPASADENA EVENTS & ACTIVITIES CALENDARClick here for Movie Showtimescenter_img Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked * Pasadena’s ‘626 Day’ Aims to Celebrate City, Boost Local Economy Herbeauty8 Easy Exotic Meals Anyone Can MakeHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyHere Are Indian Women’s Best Formulas For Eternal BeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty10 Brutally Honest Reasons Why You’re Still SingleHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty7 Most Startling Movie Moments We Didn’t Realize Were InsensitiveHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyNerdy Movie Kids Who Look Unrecognizable TodayHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty10 Most Influential Women In HistoryHerbeautyHerbeauty Get our daily Pasadena newspaper in your email box. Free.Get all the latest Pasadena news, more than 10 fresh stories daily, 7 days a week at 7 a.m. Make a comment First Heatwave Expected Next Week Home of the Week: Unique Pasadena Home Located on Madeline Drive, Pasadena Top of the News Community Newslast_img read more

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BBB: Warning: Pyramid schemes taking aim at social media

first_img BBB: Warning: Pyramid schemes taking aim at social media Twitter Pinterest By admin – February 4, 2018 BBB Scam TrackerIt’s a scam that almost seems as old as the ancient structures in which it was named after, but this time, it appears to be targeting a much younger demographic. Pyramid schemes have recently been showing up on social media feeds, like Facebook and Instagram. It’s also targeting Snapchat, where, according to Statista, 60% of users are between the ages of 13 and 24.This new type of pyramid scheme uses the same concepts as the age-old trick. It involves someone buying into a company where their return on investment doesn’t depend on the sale of a product, but on bringing in new investors. It eventually becomes mathematically impossible for this investment to continue as it constantly needs new recruits to continue making money, and there are only a finite amount of people. Meanwhile, most of that money goes to the few investors at the top of the pyramid.For this new scam, con artists attempt to lure social media users to send money via cash apps like PayPal or Venmo. The scam artists say recruits can make anywhere from $400 to $1,200 depending on how much money is put into the pyramid scheme.To avoid the scheme altogether, the Better Business Bureau recommends taking the following steps:Be very wary of buzz words. Certain phrases should raise a red flag for an investment opportunity. Don’t believe anything that is “guaranteed” to do well, or that offers low or no risk with a high return. Pyramid schemes (even if they are not called that) require you to bring in other investors in order to recoup your initial investment.Be careful of shortened links. Scammers use link-shortening services to disguise malicious links.Don’t trust your friends’ taste online. It might not actually be them “liking” or sharing scam links to photos.Report suspicious links to the site. Whether on Facebook, Instagram or Twitter, report any suspicious posts or activity to the site by going to their help link.It’s also important to know the difference between a pyramid scheme and multi-level marketing. While pyramid schemes are illegal and focus solely on recruiting new members, multi-level marketing companies make money through their own sales as well as the sales of people who they recruit to their sales teams. For those with any interest or concerns about joining a legal, multi-level marketing operation, advice on what to know before becoming a member can be found at bbb.org. Pinterest Heather Massey is the Regional Director of the Better Business Bureau in the Permian Basin. Check out www.bbb.org or call 563-1880. Twittercenter_img Facebook Facebook WhatsApp WhatsApp Local NewsBusiness Previous articleRegistration deadline to vote is MondayNext articleELAM: The correction begins adminlast_img read more

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