South Carolina prisons: Death by medical neglect

first_imgThis is Part 3 of an interview conducted after an April 15 rebellion at Lee Correctional Institution, a South Carolina maximum security prison. Jared Ware spoke with individuals inside Lee, including one who identified himself as a member of Jailhouse Lawyers Speak, a group of imprisoned human rights advocates who have called for a National Prison Strike from Aug. 21 to Sept. 9.Jared Ware: I’ve heard some reporting on how high the death numbers are from South Carolina over the past couple years, but I’ve also heard from some prisoners that they believe the death numbers are actually much higher than what’s being reported.S: Yeah, they are only reporting certain kinds of deaths, not including some deaths that they have caused themselves. Just to give you an example, they have a cell in the area they call the RHU (Restrictive Housing Unit) that’s supposed to be the area they put people that get in trouble or whatever. And they’ve got a cell that’s called a CI (Crisis Intervention) cell. That’s where they strip you, make you get butt-naked, you got no clothes on, no nothing, and when they do bring you something, they’ll bring you a suicide blanket only.A guy years ago, he said he was going to kill himself, so they put him in the CI. The guy told one of the lieutenants later on that night he was cool. The lieutenant gave the man a sheet, and then they say the man hanged himself. But by policy and by rule, nobody is supposed to have [any] sheets in [any] CI cell, and everybody know that, especially the lieutenant, who’s a supervisor. So that’s their fault. He was a mentally ill patient. That’s on them.D: Absolutely. I’d like to add to that. One of the reasons why the number is probably higher as well is they’re dealing with medical neglect. We’ve seen incidents where guys fall out, [and] get no medical treatment whatsoever. I consider those direct murders, as well, of the state. When staff are failing to respond or respond and say, “Oh, you’re faking it, you’re not having a heart attack,” and you fall out and die right there. We saw that happen several times as well. So this also would account for why some of the prisoners would say that these numbers definitely would be higher, after they are witnessing some people being allowed to die, the way that they’re being allowed to die.FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thisFacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thislast_img read more

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Huntley, Moss Lead No. 11 Utah over Idaho State, 31-0

first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailSALT LAKE CITY (AP) — Tyler Huntley threw for 282 yards and three touchdowns and Zach Moss ran for 106 yards and another score in No. 11 Utah’s 31-0 victory over Idaho State on Saturday.In the first quarter, Moss passed Tony Lindsay for second place on Utah’s career rushing yards list.His 1-yard scoring plunge later in the quarter moved him into the No. 2 spot by himself in career rushing touchdowns at 27. On just 10 carries, Moss also recorded his 13th 100-yard rushing performance with 10:05 still left in the second quarter.Huntley completed 15 of 19 passes before leaving in the third quarter as Utah moved to 3-0 for the fifth time in the last six seasons.Through the first two games, Utah didn’t throw many long passes, but Huntley aired it out on his third pass — an 82-yard TD strike to Bryan Thompson that traveled 55 yards in the air.On Utah’s next possession, Huntley connected on a 60-yard pass to Brant Kuithe for another score.The lone first-half highlight for the Bengals was stopping the Utes on fourth down at the 1 when Huntley mishandled the snap on a sneak attempt.Utah was the only team in the FBS that had yet to commit a turnover or allow a sack this season until Britain Covey lost a fumble with 9:46 to play.The Utes have won all eight games they’ve played against the Bengals and the closest game was 24-0 in 1944.POLL IMPLICATIONSThe Utes scored on their first four possessions and drove to the 1-yard-line on their fifth drive while holding the Bengals to 57 yards in the first half while most starters were still in the game. Considering the FCS competition, the gaudy statistics and lopsided score may not be enough to move the Utes up or even hold steady.THE TAKEAWAYIdaho State: The Bengals looked overmatched from the start and didn’t cross mid-field until the second half. Idaho State played both Matt Struck and Gunnar Amos but neither had much time to throw and often missed their targets.Utah: The Ute offense showed a few new formations and plays and completed a few downfield passes to gain a comfortable lead that allowed them to sit Moss midway through the second quarter. Other than 11 penalties and a fourth-quarter lost fumble, the Utes achieved their goal of playing clean and getting a host of second- and third-team players some experience. The defense bolstered its suffocating reputation.UP NEXTIdaho visits Northern Iowa next Saturday.The Utes open Pac-12 play at No. 24 Southern Cal on Friday. Written by September 14, 2019 /Sports News – Local Huntley, Moss Lead No. 11 Utah over Idaho State, 31-0 Tags: Tyler Huntley/Utah Utes Football/Zack Moss Associated Presslast_img read more

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Was Velociraptor a Dragon?

first_imgAs if Velociraptor, the terror of Jurassic Park, was not scary enough, some scientists are now saying it was feathered.  (This, of course, does not imply it could fly after its human prey like some movie dragon.)  The latest claim in Science is based on the apparent presence of “quill knobs” on the radius bone of a specimen found in Mongolia.  In their “Brevia” article, the authors claimed this is direct evidence that the dinosaur had quilled feathers.  Other science reporters took up the claim without a flap, among them Science Daily, the BBC News and National Geographic News, which may feel some relief after its Archaeoraptor embarrassment (11/21/2002, 09/27/2000).1Alan H. Turner, Peter J. Makovicky, Mark A. Norell, “Feather Quill Knobs in the Dinosaur Velociraptor,” Science, 21 September 2007: Vol. 317. no. 5845, p. 1721, DOI: 10.1126/science.1145076.Since nobody else seems to be asking the hard questions, let’s take a look at this claim.  The paper and its photos do not appear convincing to a skeptical eye.  Consider these points:The evidence is circumstantial, not definitive.The claim came from one bone, not from multiple samples of Velociraptor.  The first thing they should have done was examine other specimens.No feathers or feather imprints were found (see 09/06/2007, footnote 2).There were only 6 of the structures, and they looked like dimples, not knobs.The dimples followed a curve, not a straight line as on the vulture bone shown for comparison.The putative quill knobs were in the middle third of the bone but did not continue to the right or left; why would an arm have only six feathers in the middle of the arm?  The vulture bone showed the knobs all the way along the bone.They did not show similar knobs on the other arm, or on any of the other parts of the skeleton.Not all birds have quill knobs.  Eagles, for instance, do not.  The authors admit that lack of the knobs is not evidence for lack of feathers, but argue that presence of knobs is direct evidence for feathers.  This is an argument from silence, because there might have been non-feathered animals with knobs.  Their ending statement, therefore, is unsupportable: “Whether this feature represents retention of an ancestral function or the cooption for other purposes, the presence of quilled feathers on the posterior of the arms in a medium-sized derived, clearly nonvolant dromaeosaur can now be established.”These structures might have had a different function than supporting feathers.Velociraptor had no use for feathers.  The authors admit that the skeleton of the creature did not allow it to fly; the arms are too short to serve as wings.The authors could only speculate what feathers would be used for: perhaps sexual display or downward lift while running.  For this they referred to Ken Dial’s ridiculous hypothesis about the origin of flight (see 05/01/2006, 12/22/2003, 01/16/2003).The paper claims that Velociraptor descended from more bird-like feathered dinosaurs that might have been capable of flight.  Not only is there no evidence for this, it would represent devolution, not evolution.Feathers are very different from scales.  The existence of pits along an arm bone falls far short of explaining how complex feathers could have evolved.  The authors said, “This report of secondaries in a larger-bodied, derived, and clearly flightless member of a nonavian theropod clade represented by feathered relatives is a substantial contribution to our knowledge of the evolution of feathers.”  Such a claim vastly oversteps the evidence.The introduction said, “Some nonavian theropod dinosaurs were at least partially covered in feathers or filamentous protofeathers.”  But the reference was to a paper by one of the coauthors, not to an independent source.  It would have been a more solid argument to cite a critic of dinosaur-to-bird evolution as a hostile witness.They said “We present direct evidence of feathers” but did not show any feathers!  The evidence, therefore, was indirect.Quill knobs are usually indicative of secondary feathers, i.e., those with vanes and barbs used for flight.  None of the other “feathered dinosaur” candidates have advanced feathers like this, unless they were arguably true birds.The bone was found in isolation and “possesses several characteristics” of Velociraptor.  This allows for the possibility this bone was misclassified.This claim cannot be taken in isolation from the other controversies about dinosaur-to-bird evolution (see 09/06/2007 and its embedded links to previous entries; see also the four Dinosaur chain links in the Oct. 2005 page).Paleontologists with more experience, with access to this bone, will need to weigh in on this claim.  But even if definitive evidence were to be established for feathered Velociraptors, what would this mean for creationists?  Nothing.  It would mean that extinct creatures were more varied than previously thought.  Some birds and reptiles had teeth, and some did not.  Some birds and reptiles flew, and some did not.  Some birds and reptiles had different numbers of toes.  The morphological differences within class Aves and within class Reptilia is enormous even today (picture ostrich vs hummingbird, alligator vs turtle).  The diversity was even much more so in the past.  Creationists allow for a Designer who could use His designed structures where needed.  There are many other cases where common structures are found in different groups; evolutionists explain them away with their miracle phrase, “convergent evolution.”  Feathering would just add one more example.    Feathered Velociraptors would also mean that the scientists were wrong, and the animators of Jurassic Park were wrong.  It would not establish a link between dinosaurs and birds, because this creature was not on the line leading to birds.  Even the authors admitted that the Velociraptor lineage must have been in the process of losing its feathers (if these members indeed had any), while the ancestors (according to the story) would have had functioning feathers, with no ancestors before that showing how the feathers evolved.    Evolutionists are in a frantic campaign to support their theory.  That’s why this circumstantial evidence is getting so much press.  But at best, it’s merely another argument from homology.  As Jonathan Wells pointed out so well in his book Icons of Evolution, homology does not prove evolution; it can just as well support common design.  Give them all the feathered dinosaurs they want; it will not prove that one kind of animal evolved into another kind.  Until then, we’d like to see a lot better evidence than this one bone.    Notice one other thing about scientific papers in this vein.  Its authors referenced Ken Dial’s absurd just-so story suggesting that flight evolved when baby dinosaurs held out their arms as stabilizers while running uphill.   These guys used Dial’s paper for support rather than laughing at it as they should have.  This would be a good time to re-read the entry from 03/17/2006, in which a team of social scientists demonstrated that scientific papers can actually perpetuate false ideas rather than build up knowledge.    On the History Channel tonight, a documentary was shown that illustrates how vastly different interpretations can come from the same evidence.  A 2005 program about dragons was rerun.  It acknowledged that dragon legends exist worldwide, crossing all cultures around the world: Maya, Chinese, American Indian, European.  The similarities between these legends is striking.  Also, each culture believed that these creatures really existed, and some claimed that they were witnessed in recent times.  How is this to be explained?    Creationists have used these facts to support the idea that humans and dinosaurs coexisted till recent times, and the memory of the awesome beasts was perpetuated in dragon legends.  The secular TV program admitted that dragons bear striking resemblances to dinosaurs, but it put forth a completely different explanation.  Assuming in advance that the existence of humans and dinosaurs was impossible, the commentators made up explanations out of thin air: for instance, that humans are hard-wired to imagine dragons in their evolved brains, such that instinctive fear of predators (eagles, snakes and lions) combined into one imaginary creature, the dragon.  The program also suggested that primitive peoples found dinosaur bones in the ground and projected them into their mythology as large, fearsome monsters.  “Instincts that kept our evolutionary ancestors from being eaten,” combined with the human capacity for vivid imagination, produced dragon myths around the world, independently, with striking similarities in many details.  The program, as could be expected, claimed ownership of “science” as its superior alternative to any other explanation.  This is not about science.  It’s about the science of one world view arguing with the science of another.    According to Dykstra’s Law, everyone is someone else’s weirdo.  Creationists will surely laugh as hard at the evolutionary explanation as the evolutionists would about the creation alternative.  This is not to say that all weirdos are equally weird, or that all weird ideas have equal validity, or that world views are arbitrary.  It does illustrate, though, that evidence does not interpret itself.  Presuppositions and biases cannot be avoided.  They need to be acknowledged and can, to some degree, be kept under control by honesty and love of the truth.  Claims about Velociraptor feathers need more control than we are seeing today.(Visited 66 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

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Unesco fellowship for SA scientist

first_imgDr Hanneline Smit of StellenboschUniversity accepting her fellowship at theL’Oréal-Unesco “For Women in Science”Awards.Janine ErasmusDr Hanneline Smit of Stellenbosch University and 14 other young women researchers, three of them from Africa, received a research fellowship at the tenth edition of the L’Oréal-Unesco “For Women in Science” Awards, which give international recognition to women in the life sciences.Smit was honoured along with fellow Africans Yonelle Dea Moukoumbi from Gabon, who conducts research into a hardy new strain of African rice known as Nerica, and Maria Joao Rodrigues from Mozambique, whose research examines the impact of diseases on coral communities growing in the western Indian Ocean.Smit’s research will concentrate on the exploration of historical factors which may have shaped the current genetic diversity of small birds and mammals in the neighbouring Succulent Karoo and Nama Karoo biomes of South Africa. A biome is a large geographical area characterised by certain types of plants and animals.The L’Oréal-Unesco fellowship programme offers doctoral and post-doctoral women scientists the opportunity to pursue their research in internationally renowned institutions outside their home countries. As of 2006 the fellowship is worth a maximum of US$40 000 over a period of two years.In addition, five eminent women scientists from regions around the world received a L’Oréal-Unesco Award on the night. The Awards, which are a separate element of the programme, recognise high-achieving women scientists who are role models for future generations.The five laureates are Prof Lihadh Al-Gazali from the United Arab Emirates, Assistant Prof V. Narry Kim of the Republic of Korea, Prof Ada Yonath from Israel, Prof Ana Belén Elgoyhen from Argentina, and Prof Elizabeth Blackburn from the US.Exploring genetic differencesSmit’s research will focus on the Karoo area in the Western Cape province. In many cases small animals in the two Karoo regions in question, although they are of the same species, show genetic differences. This is thought to be due to biogeographic events in the distant past which separated the two regions on a geologic or climatic basis.Smit plans to collect DNA samples from these creatures, study the genetic differences, correlate them with geographical data, and look for the emergence of any geographical patterns.This information will prove useful in predicting future evolutionary pressures and identifying distinct geographical regions that may need special species protection.“The ultimate aim of the project is to provide information that could be used to conserve the biodiversity resources in South Africa at landscape, ecosystem, habitat, community, population, species and gene levels,” said Smit.She will work at the University of California-Berkeley in the US, under the guidance of Prof Rauri Bowie of that university’s Department of Integrative Biology. Bowie obtained his PhD from the University of Cape Town.Smit, of Stellenbosch University’s Department of Botany and Zoology, received her doctorate in March 2008. Her dissertation focused on the phylogeography of three indigenous southern African elephant shrews. Phylogeography is the study of the distribution of genetic diversity over geographic regions.Working under Prof Terry Robinson and Dr Bettine van Vuuren, Smit studied evolutionary relationships among 15 species of African elephant shrews and in the process she helped to discover a new species of the small mammal.The 16th African elephant shrew species weighs a mere 47g. In accordance with scientific tradition the little creature will only be officially named when a report has been published in a recognised journal.Encouraging scientific vocations for womenThe L’Oréal-Unesco Awards for women in science was established in 1998. The fellowship programme followed two years later and since its inception has recognised a total of 120 fellows from 67 countries. In total, taking both award and fellowships into consideration, more than 500 women have been singled out for recognition.Research projects are submitted for consideration to the fellowship selection committee by the various Unesco national commissions. These are national bodies set up by Unesco member states for the purpose of aligning their governmental and non-governmental bodies with Unesco’s work.Submitted projects very often focus on specific needs of local populations, or may relate to original fields of research, such as a current study of the interactions of different areas of the brain in healthy and depressed patients.Besides the three African fellows, the other fellowship recipients for 2008 hail from Nepal, Slovenia, Argentina, Brazil, Colombia, Indonesia, Mongolia, Kuwait, Lebanon, Morocco, Italy and the Netherlands.Related articlesNerica rice to combat hunger in AfricaUseful linksFor Women in ScienceL’OrealAssociation for Women in ScienceNama KarooSucculent KarooRauri Bowie’s research groupStellenbosch Universitylast_img read more

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SA stunned by Oscar Pistorius news

first_img14 February 2013 South Africans woke up on Thursday morning to the news that Paralympic and Olympic champion Oscar Pistorius has been remanded in police custody for the shooting death of Reeva Steenkamp, 30, in his home in Pretoria in the early hours of the morning. Media reports allege that Pistorius accidentally shot Steenkamp, his model girlfriend, and there is speculation that he mistook her for an intruder. “Paramedics declared the woman dead on the scene and police proceeded with their investigation,” said South African Police Service spokesperson Lieutenant Colonel Katlego Mogale. “The woman sustained wounds to her head and upper body.” Police confirmed that a 9mm pistol was recovered from the scene and that a 26- year-old male was taken into custody. “I can confirm that a 26-year-old suspect will be appearing in the Pretoria Magistrate’s Court this afternoon,” Mogale said. Police declined to confirm the identity of the man in custody but confirmed that a woman was fatally wounded in a shooting at Pistorius’s house. Pistorius, 26, was the first double amputee to run in the Olympics. He is known as the Blade Runner because of the ground-breaking prosthetics he uses for racing. He made history at the London 2012 Olympics when he became the first amputee sprinter to compete in the able-bodied Games, running in the 400m and 4x400m relay. The Johannesburg-born athlete, who was born without fibulas in his legs and had the limbs amputated below the knee when he was 11 months old, had to win a legal battle over his blades with the International Association of Athletics Federations (IAAF) in 2008 for the right to compete in able-bodied competition. SAinfo reporterlast_img read more

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Is a Ground-Source Heat Pump the Right Choice?

first_imgIn Grand Rapids, Michigan, Andy Zbojniewicz is planning a large, high-performance home that ultimately will be powered by a 15-kW solar array. The house will have more than 3,000 square feet above grade, and another 1,633 square feet in the basement. His immediate concern is how to heat and cool the house. “I was told the home was too large to heat and cool with air-source heat pumps and be comfortable,” Zbojniewicz writes in a Q&A post,  “so [I] was primarily looking at geothermal.”RELATED ARTICLESDucted Air-Source Heat Pumps from American ManufacturersGround-Source Heat Pumps Don’t Save EnergyAir-Source or Ground-Source Heat Pump?Are Affordable Ground-Source Heat Pumps On the Horizon?All About Radiant Floors To that end, Zbojniewicz sought quotes from two HVAC contractors for ground-source heat pumps. One of the contractors said the heating load would be 50,797 Btu per hour at an outside temperature (design temperature) of 7°F, and recommended a 5-ton (60,000 Btu/h) heat pump. The second company didn’t provide its load calculations, but suggested that Zbojniewicz would need two 3-ton heat pumps in order to stay comfortable. “I have a friend who is in HVAC and he feels strongly that I should have radiant tubing run in the basement to help with heating in winter,” Zbojniewicz adds, “and while I was at it I was going to run it in the mudroom, master bath, and three-season porch.” After doing some reading at GBA, Zbojniewicz realizes there are plenty of critics of both ground-source heat pumps and radiant-floor distribution systems. “Is there a better alternative to geothermal if I want to have the potential for net zero?” he asks. “If I stick with geothermal, are two 3- ton heat pumps overkill (they’re certainly more expensive)? Should I abort the radiant altogether?” That’s the topic for this Q&A Spotlight. There is nothing wrong with air-source heat pumps The outside design temperature for Grand Rapids, Michigan, is 5° or 6°F, GBA Editor Martin Holladay says, so Zbojniewicz can certainly consider air-source heat pumps. A heat pump from a U.S. manufacturer paired with a conventional forced-air duct system would be fine. Holladay suggests that Zbojniewicz read a GBA article, “Ducted Air-Source Heat Pumps from American Manufacturers.” Dana Dorsett adds, “I’m aware of a house in Vermont slightly larger than yours and slightly less insulated, in a location with a 99% outside design temp of -12°F that is heated with four ductless mini-splits. The notion that your house is ‘too large’ to heat with a heat pump is just silly. It’s the size of the heat load, not the house, that matters.” There are some pluses to a ground-source system Jon R contends that radiant heat paired with a ground-source heat pump is great — as long as Zbojniewicz doesn’t care about how much the system costs. Such a system not only provides space heating but also provides efficient water heating. “If you are looking at air-to-water geo-exchange, then you can add a water tank (thermal mass), resolving any heat pump over-sizing issue other than cost,” Jon R adds. “If very large, it can enable some use of solar PV that doesn’t involve net metering. Multi-stage or multiple heat pumps also mitigate over-sizing.” Those load calculations are probably wrong The capacity of any system that Zbojniewicz installs should be based on two factors: the climate, and how well the house is air sealed and insulated. And Dorsett doesn’t have much confidence in the heat load estimates that one of Zbojniewicz’s contractors has provided. “Don’t believe the 50K heat loss number unless it was done by a qualified third party,” Dorsett writes, “an engineer, RESNET rater etc.,  somebody who makes their living and reputation on the accuracy of their numbers rather than installing and maintaining HVAC equipment.” Even a code-minimum house of that size with a measured air tightness of 3 ach50 would have a heat load of less than 40,000 Btu per hour, he says, assuming an outdoor temperature of 0°. “The only way to stretch it to 50K would be to have excessive air leakage or excessive expanses of window area,” Dorsett says. “Your house is likely to come in closer 30K @ 0F, 36K tops and even less at +7F.” With that in mind, a heat pump with a capacity of 60,000 Btu/hour is about twice the size that Zbojniewicz really needs. The place to start, Dorsett says, is a Manual J heat load calculation, and it’s his bet that two modulating Fujitsu minisplits or possibly a 3-ton Carrier Infinity Greenspeed air-source heat pump with heating strips would keep the family comfortable. Steve Theinalienable’s experience bears that out. “My house insulation, climate, windows, and foundation insulation are almost exactly the same as yours, just a bit smaller (2200 square feet),” he says. “My design heat load at -18°C [roughly 0°F] is 18K Btu, but we had a day like that this week, and my air-source heat pump didn’t have to work that hard to keep up, so, I think it’s probably a bit conservative.” Get your house rated by a pro, Theinalienable says. Consider the all-electric option With a tight building envelope and a relative large photovoltaic system, why not consider an all-electric house? asks Armando Cobo. “I would highly advise you to consider going all-electric with an air-to-air heat pump, and hopefully installing [Energy Star] appliances and lighting, electric fireplaces and an induction cooktop,” he says. “That’s what I spec on all my houses, which are [zero energy ready homes]. Just a thought!” In fact, Zbojniewicz is trying to convince his wife that an electric fireplace and induction cooktop are good choices. Zephyr7 suggests he invest $50 or $60 in a portable, one-burner induction cooktop and experiment with it. “Have your wife play around with it,” he says. “It’s an inexpensive way to test out induction cooking. Note that not all pots are compatible with induction cooking.” Insulating the rim joist One footnote to Zbojniewicz’s efforts to obtain more accurate heat load estimates involves insulation. He’s found a company that will do Manual J calculations, but he’s not sure how to specify the insulation he will use at the rim joist. What’s the best approach? “Closed-cell [spray foam] is pretty standard for use on rim joists,” replies Zephyr7. “Lots of people use kits like those from Foam it Green and the Dow Froth-Pak. What you want to avoid is keeping the wood wet. Your assembly sounds like it won’t be a problem, but make sure you have a capillary break between the rim joist and the top of the foundation wall.” Cobo says open-cell foam is best at the rim joist when rigid foam will be applied to the outside of the wall. Because Zbojniewicz is planning to use Rockwool on the outside of the house, either open- or closed-cell foam can be used, he adds. Holladay suggests he choose closed-cell foam, not open-cell foam. “In a cold climate, closed-cell spray foam would be a better choice for the interior of a rim joist,” he says. “You’re right that either type of spray foam is an air barrier. The reason that closed-cell spray foam is better is because it is a vapor barrier, unlike open-cell spray foam. The closed-cell spray foam prevents outward diffusion of water vapor, and therefore keeps the rim joist dryer.” Our expert weighs in Peter Yost, GBA’s technical director, adds this: Cold-climate heat pumps: It is interesting to hear the misgivings that air-source heat pumps will be unable to manage either larger homes and/or cold climates. I was just in Wisconsin recently and heard the same litany. Dana Dorsett, as usual, is right on: Heating loads are assessed using U-factors and building enclosure surface areas (and other metrics, including airtightness), not square feet of living or conditioned space. In the Northeast, heat pumps designed to wring out BTUs at air temperatures well below 0°F have proven efficient and reliable. Marc Rosenbaum, a leading and inherently skeptical mechanical engineer, has helped spread the word by recounting his own great success with cold-climate air-source heat pumps. We did have problematic cold-climate heat pumps in the past (both Nyle and the Hallowell cold climate heat pumps had problems and went out of business some 10 years ago) and that news seems to persist. The technology of today’s cold-climate heat pumps is very different and has proven to be robust. (See numerous GBA resources on the topic, including this one.) Radiant-floor heating. We just can’t seem to get our arms around the pros and cons of this method of heat distribution. It is not more efficient. There is nothing magical about radiant-floor heat. Its efficiency is driven by the same physics that governs all other distribution systems. And part of the physics is the mass to which the distribution system is connected. It’s very difficult if not impossible to gain efficiency by way of thermostat setback. It is more comfortable. It’s hard to argue with this, either empirically or based on heat transfer. In my experience, well-designed and installed radiant floor heating systems deliver superior thermal comfort. Radiant-floor distribution can be used for space cooling. As Robert Bean has said more times than he cares to count: We keep blaming condensation during cooling on the radiant system when, if the latent load were properly managed, radiant cooling can work just fine (for more, see this). Insulating the rim joist: In my experience, rim joists get wet from backsplash at grade from the exterior or, less commonly, wicking because there is no capillary break between the mudsill (or sill beam) and the foundation wall. In cold climates, I don’t see rim joists getting wet from air leakage because the stack effect is pulling cold dry air in during the winter at the rim joist. So, the main reason for me to choose open- or closed-cell spray foam at the rim joist — since both can provide a good air seal at this location — is based on how much drying potential I need to the interior (open-cell spray foam being more vapor-permeable than closed-cell). Manual J: It’s really heartbreaking to hear how often heat-load calculations are not done. Can you imagine a car company designing a transmission system without knowing the horsepower and torque the engine can generate? On the other hand, it’s heartening to see how often the general public ends up on GBA’s Q&A pages to work with leading building professionals on home performance.last_img read more

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QUEENSLAND ORIGIN SQUADS ANNOUNCED

first_imgWomen’s 30Dawn Aaskov – SCFBDTanya Bougoure – SCFBDAmanda Bourne – SWQLeanne Brooks – SQBDKim Cetinich – NQJude Dumke – SCFBDMaryanne Fisher – SQBDNatalie Leicht – SWQNatalie Leis – SQBDTheresa Lowe – NQSharlene McNamara – SWQJackie Morris – SWQBrooke O’Brien – NQKatie Pope – NQSam Ramsamy – NQKylie Robinson – SQBDSharon Searston – SQBDBritt Sharkey – NQCarene Ward – SWQDebbie Wilson – SQBDKelly Zelinski – SQBDMen’s 35s Lawrence Fisher – BCCorey Foster – SQBD Troy Great – NQCameron Hall – SQBD Dave Hartmann – BCGeoff Hooper – BCRhys Jones – BCIan Jordan – SQBD Robin Kildare – SQBD Sam Lee – BCColm Maguire – SQBD Paul Mason – CQPeter Murray – NQCraig Neilan – SWQJimmy Neilan – SWQLeigh O’Brien – NQShane Rigby – SQBD Reece Sale – NQCraig Slavin – SQBD Peter Tong – SQBD Cameron Upton – CQGraham White – SWQMatthew Wood – CQWomen’s 35s Kaye Broadfoot – SWQDeb Collingwood – BCKaren Cooksley – BC Sherry Ey – SQBDCathy Farrelly – BCSandy Gleeson – SWQBronwyn Green – SWQJayne Halvorsen – SQBDDebbie Harris-Taaffe – SQBDKaren Hegadus – SWQTammy House – CQSelena Kelly – SWQDionne Kelvin – NQSharon Kildare – SQBDAmanda Koehler – SQBDJudy McCarthy – SQBDAlison McWhirter – BCKelly Morris – SQBDMichelle Muir – SQBDEllen Pengilly – SWQLorelle Sankey – SWQTanya Shuker – CQTracey Upton – CQLexia Willmington – BCMen’s 40s Mitch Bonaventura – SQBDPaul Carmody – SWQPaul Erickson – SQBDAndrew Fox – SWQSteve Green – SQBDMook Harrington – SQBDMichael Hunter – BCDavid Kofoa – SQBDDarren Kuskopf – CQDarren Lawrence – CQJustin Lawrence – CQGreg Lisle – SWQTony Mikkelsen – CQPatrick O’Brien – BCPeter Owen – SQBDLuke Shaw – SQBDWayne Short – CQSean Slinger – BCRodney Wilson – SWQSteve Womersley – SQBDWomen’s 40s Louise Alexander – BCKatina Davis – NQHeather Desbois – NQJoyce Downes – SQBDAnna Fuiava – SQBDRhonda Grehan – SQBDHaylene Grogan – SWQ Leanne Hudson – BCVirginia Ingham – SQBDSharon Jones – SQBDKaren McNamara – CQAngie McPhee – BCLisa Miller – SQBDKerry Robinson – SQBDAlison Twiname – NQFiona White – CQCarlie Young – BCMen’s 45sBrett Allen – SQBDGreg Carmody – SWQPhil Driese – SWQKevin Flett – SWQJohn Hall – SWQWally Hanley – SWQSteve Hennessey – SQBDAndrew Hooper – SCFBDMark Jansson – SQBDAllan Jenkins – NQRon Keleher – SCFBDDarryl Lancaster – SQBDPeter Le Feuvre – NQBarry Matthews – SQBDStewart McCarther – SCFBDBill McLean – BCLes Patience – SQBDWayne Rohlf – SCFBDHank Solien – SQBDTrevor Strahan – NQBill Szaba – SQBDAshley Taylor – SCFBDGlenn Todd – SCFBDMen’s 50s Dallas Anderson – SCFBDMichael Arnold – SWQDon Baartz – BCSteven Berry – CQDavid Brown – BCRon Dejun – BCRay Downs – NQTerry Ford – SWQKev Hickey – BCGerard Kearney – NQIan Kerr – NQTony Lacaze – BCMichael Long – SCFBDIan MacLeod – SQBDRob McCarthy – BCBryan Pullar – BCGreg Purves – SWQPeter Rowe – NQMike Thoars – BCGreg Young – BC Women’s Open Kirsty Beer – CQKristy Brennan – SQBDAli Brigginshaw – BCNikki Etheridge – SWQGemma Etheridge – SWQBelinda Hammett – SQBDSamantha Hopkin – BCEmily Hopkin – BCAlyce Hulbert – SQBDShaye MacLeod – SQBDShelley Matchem – SCFBDKelly McGennity – NQTeena McIlveen – SQBDGreta Perkins – CQLauren Potter – SWQPeta Rogerson – SCFBDHayley Rogerson – SCFBDJane Royal – NQJessica Shaw – SQBDMary Steel – BCRoxanne Winder – SQBDKelly Woods – BCMixed OpenKatie Aitkins – BCJohn Andrews – SQBDMichael Baartz – BCCasey Clark – SCFBDTom Eyeles – BCLucas Feldman – BCAmy Fong – SQBDClare Giarola – SQBDTara Mako – SQBDHayley McAnelly – SQBDBen McCullum – SQBDLauren McDonald – SQBDCorey Meredith – BCLuke Parker – BCShannon Sankey – BCMissy Shaw – SQBDMen’s 20sNicholas Brigginshaw – BCKristian Congoo – NQJosh Evans – SQBDCorrie Gilbert – CQ Cody Green – BCStuart Hayes – BCRyan Jacks – BC Rhys Jacks – BCJoel Keune – CQJay Latumahina – BCGus Law – BCKeith MacDonald – SQBDBernard Matthews – BCTroy Mendham – SCFBDPeter Norman – SQBDJustin Otto – CQToby Pirini – SQBDJeremy Russo – CQKarl Skinner – SQBDDylan Taikato – SQBDDamien Townson – NQWomen’s 20s Alika Bedford – SQBDLizzie Campbell – BCEmilee Cherry – SWQRebecca Clarkson – SCFBDMegan Clarkson – SCFBDEmily Edwards – SQBDKylie Gainer – SQBDBelinda Hayes – SWQKelly Jones – BCGenevieve Lacaze – BCTallon McCarthy – BCAlyce McCloskey – CQNicole Michael – NQKimberley O’Connor – CQSavannah Pratten – SCFBDKirsty Quince – BCEmily Reed – SCFBDAlieia Spence -NQ Marikki Watego – SQBDMen’s 30s Daryl Ashton – BCColin Beckitt – NQMatt Bowe – SWQGuy Dorrick – NQLawrence Fisher – BCMatthew Flaherty – BCMichael Hall – BCMark Hartley – SQBDMark Henricksen – BCAlex Hinch – SWQTrevor Lake – BCDavid Lockhart – SQBDDamien Logan – NQTrent MacDonald – SWQJason McNamara – BCChris Neville – SWQJason Powell – CQCraig Searston – SQBDJamie Wallace – SWQKenny Ward – SWQBen Warren – CQ The 2008 Queensland State of Origin squads have been announced after the selection process was completed at the X-Blades Queensland State Regional Championships conducted in Toowoomba from October 5-7 2007.All players whose names appear in the 2008 State squads have all responded to the letter of offer forwarded to them. The squads will take part in the first of the selection camps to be conducted on December 1-2 2007 at Redlands in the lead-up to the State of Origin Series to be played in Sydney in August 2008. A number of positions have not yet been finalised with several players being on leave since the letters were forwarded.The Queensland Touch Association will update the squads when all letters of offer have been responded to.Men’s Open Troy Clark – SCFBDDrummayne Day-Berg Muir – SQBDAsh Farrow – SCFBDChris Farrow – SCFBDGian Guerra – NQPhil Gyemore – CQMook Harrington – SQBDRalph Hickman – SQBDBrett Hughes – BCNathan Jones – SQBDBrent Madders – BCKris McMurdy – SQBDJustin Mitchell – CQDamian Moar – SQBDRyan Pollock – SQBDSebe Rey – BCBen Roberts – SCFBDBen Robinson – SQBDMichael Rogers – BCGavin Shuker – CQTroy Skinner – SQBDMitchell Smith – CQPeter Stoddard – SQBDClint Withers – CQDaniel Withers – CQlast_img read more

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