Director of health services to step down

first_img Related Expanded Counseling and Mental Health Services After 15 years of service dedicated to improving health and wellness at Harvard, Paul Barreira will step down as director of Harvard University Health Services (HUHS), effective Nov. 18.During his tenure, Barreira made significant strides in the advancement of HUHS’ mission to provide compassionate, high-quality care, and to support the health and well-being of Harvard’s diverse patient populations. Barreira addressed critical public-health concerns, remained committed to continual improvement in the health of Harvard’s students, and consistently applied forward-thinking approaches to deliver high-quality, compassionate care, leaving an indelible mark on the University.“Paul Barreira has brought his deep and wide understanding of university health to Harvard,” said Faculty Dean Judy Palfrey, the T. Berry Brazelton Professor of Pediatrics at Harvard Medical School and the director of the Global Pediatrics Program for the Department of Medicine at the Children’s Hospital in Boston.“The physical and mental health concerns of our students are central to their success in School and in life,” Palfrey said. “Paul has used the most up-to-date methods for administering a ‘medical home’ for students, monitoring their health and well-being with sophisticated survey methodology and introducing creative clinical innovations. He has been a marvelous colleague and his work will have a lasting effect here at Harvard and on the lives of the students he has cared for with such skill and true commitment.”Under Barreira’s leadership, HUHS worked to address pressing public-health issues and their effects on the campus community. During his tenure, HUHS responded to the mumps outbreak of 2016, and developed a protocol to evaluate community members who returned to Harvard from Ebola-affected countries in 2014. Both of these initiatives are nationally recognized successes, with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reviewing Harvard’s data and trends from the mumps outbreak to determine best ways to combat future outbreaks.He also led the establishment of the Department of Health Promotion and Education, which offers a holistic approach to student health and wellness and includes the Office of Alcohol & Other Drug Services (AODS), the Center for Wellness, and the Office of Sexual Assault Prevention & Response (OSAPR), along with key contributors from HUHS in the areas of nursing, medicine, counseling and mental health, and nutrition.Perhaps most notably, Barreira established several new student peer-education groups including: Harvard Drug and Alcohol Peer Advisors, a group of student advisers who serve both as health opinion leaders and resources for their peers; student mental health liaisons (SMHL); and HealthPALS, a team of student health care liaisons between HUHS and the campus community. He also created a student-run EMS service, CrimsonEMS, and initiated and designed surveys on health and mental health for College and graduate students to better understand the community landscape, and then build new initiatives to improve upon it.“Dr. Barreira is a role model for the type of doctor, leader, and person I hope to be,” said Seth Cassel, M.D. ’13, M.D.-Ph.D. ’20. “My time working with him in the SMHL group was one of the absolute highlights of my College experience — his dedication to helping others and infectious energy are without equal.“I always knew that whatever ideas we put forward to promote positive conversations surrounding mental health, he would be there to help us make them happen,” Cassel continued. “I was always impressed by how he balanced such a significant leadership role within the University while also staying in close touch with the student body. He knew every member of our group personally, was a mentor to essentially every SMHL, and even welcomed us to his home on the Cape for very memorable annual retreats.”Barreira also recognized the importance of serving a particular population of Harvard community members — student athletes — streamlining the University’s services to add athletic trainers to HUHS staff and assigning mental health counselors specifically for athletics.According to Harvard athletic director Bob Scalise, establishing “continuity of care” with HUHS was a “big deal” and made a significant impact in the care student athletes receive, in terms of physical and mental health and in nutrition designed to help them better perform on and off the field.“Paul is thoughtful, open-minded, a terrific problem-solver, and he has a can-do attitude,” Scalise added.Barreira also improved options for mental health care on campus, both in traditional clinical options and through a budding community-health model designed to meet students where they are. He created the Department Behavioral Health and Academic Counseling (BHAC) that previously oversaw the Bureau of Study Counsel, Counseling and Mental Health Services (CAMHS), AODS, OSAPR, and the Center for Wellness. Recently, CAMHS significantly increased its resources by adding an expanded and modernized space on the fourth floor of the Smith Campus Center, increasing its staff 25 percent since spring, and launching several initiatives to serve students better no matter where they are on campus, and ensure that programming responds to and reflects the diversity in the community. Barreira also established the Department of Behavioral Health to meet the needs of faculty and staff who seek care at HUHS.Barreira worked with his leadership team to provide empathy training to the HUHS organization. He also led an effort to adopt a new style of team-based work, resulting in daily huddles in which teams identify and solve problems inside their own departments. One highlight of this has been the development of a Safety Reporting System team to ensure not only that those who experience safety events are formally responded to within seven days, but also that new protocols are created to prevent such events from happening again.Barreira has a long-standing affiliation with Harvard and its teaching hospitals. He is the founder and former program director of Waverley Place at McLean Hospital, and has been a lecturer and preceptor to psychiatry residents there since 2000. He is currently a member of eight committees and advisory boards at the University.A graduate of Boston College, magna cum laude, and Georgetown University Medical School, Barreira was recognized in 2010 as a Distinguished Fellow by the American Psychiatric Association. He has served as a member of the Massachusetts Association for Mental Health, the Massachusetts Psychiatric Society, and the National Association of Student Mental Health Program Directors. Prior to his work at HUHS, Barreira was director of community and public psychiatry for Partners HealthCare System in Boston. He has also served as deputy commissioner and medical director of the Massachusetts Department of Mental Health.Barreira will remain at the University as the director of the Graduate Student Mental Health Initiative, where he will work with the Provost’s Office of Institutional Research. In this role, Barreira will continue to help the University improve its understanding and support of graduate and professional student health.center_img Barreira, Lewis discuss new space, and how it helps broaden their missionlast_img read more

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Point-Counterpoint: Worst 5-man dodgeball team

first_imgSchmoldt’s take:To build the worst dodgeball team, it is imperative to build it around a loser-like team captain. In this case, I’ll start my team around the worst racing horse ever, Zippy Chippy. Funny name, terrible racer — he never won a race against a horse. Yes, he once beat a minor league baseball player in a race … but let’s be honest. Not only did he retire with 100 career losses, but he was booted from Finger Lakes Racetrack for failing to leave the starting gate three times in a row. If he’s got a ball flying at him, he’s probably not moving, and if he does, he’ll do it very slowly.Behind our fearful leader I have Garry Kasparov, big-time chess champion and the man who went up against various computers, including Deep Blue. He’d take so long to think about his next move that even John Daly could peg him.Next I would take Gheorghe Muresan, the man who spent less than six years in the NBA but found a way to kill his knees in that short amount of time. I remember watching him against the Bucks a decade ago. If he could barely make it down the court then, how fast is he moving now?Since Dave likes Tonya Harding, I will take her counterpart Nancy Kerrigan. I give her props for recovering to win silver after her knee was mangled. But in the end, I couldn’t listen to her every time she was hit — “Whyyyyy?” — and she wouldn’t have months to recover. Dodgeball is a year-round sport.Last, I would take Badger hockey forward Nick Licari. Don’t get me wrong, I like Licari and what he does on the ice, but he’s so used to blocking 20 shots a game that I fear that he would jump in front of the ball to save a teammate instead of try to get out of the way. Worst dodgeball team ever.McGrath’s take:My strategy for building the world’s worst dodgeball squad is centered around a simple, timeless philosophy: bigger is better because as a general rule bigger and agile usually don’t go together.The leader of my team would certainly be Konishiki Yasokichi, who at 6’1″ and 600 plus pounds is an easy target even for Schmoldt’s Zippy Chippy. Konishiki would not be much of an offensive force as he is something of a pacifist sumo. Just check out his website konishiki.net/eng, which is complete with flowers, butterflies and lots of eerie smiling photos of the svelt Samoan.John Daly would be the co-captain. Daly is listed at 5’11”, 220, but if he’s 220, then I’m the starting tailback for the University of Wisconsin football team next year. Daly will have trouble trying to dodge tosses while lighting up cigarette after cigarette. And should the chain-smoking long-drive champion actually get the ball he would surely just try to hurl it 300 yards, which would be 290 yards past his opponents.William “The Refrigerator” Perry is larger than life at 6’2″, 370 and is the most likely subject to try and eat the ball (though I wouldn’t put it past the team captain either), as he the ex-footballer has since become a professional eater.Tonya Harding is as big as female athletes come, looking more like a punching bag than a puncher during her last appearance on celebrity boxing. My team is banking on the unstable former skater either: A) Being ejected, or B) Going after her own teammates or C) being knocked out by Nancy Kerrigan (Payback!).Wrestler Hulk Hogan would round out the team as he won’t do much dodging while walking around flexing his muscles. He probably wouldn’t be up for much contact either, as this dodgeball game, while lame, is real.Coaching the team would be Don King. Once I informed him that my team had to lose, the fix would be in and any out my team recorded would be called a headshot.Defeat is mine.Go vote on who made the better point on the main Sports page!last_img read more

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Tiger Woods’ recovery plan is on the golf course

first_imgby Tim DahlbergAssociated Press Writer AUGUSTA, Ga. (AP)—Kultida Woods was worried.No, her son wasn’t being slapped with divorce papers. No mistresses or porn stars were stalking him.But he did seem on the verge of throwing away any chance he had to win the Masters. And at this moment that seemed like the most critical part of Tiger Woods’ recovery so far.“Bogey?” Mrs. Woods yelled out from her vantage point off the seventh fairway. “Come on now, stop that.” FIGHTING BACK—Tiger Woods tees off at the fourth hole during the third round of the Masters golf tournament in Augusta, Ga., April 10. Woods was plenty worried himself. He couldn’t figure out the speed of the greens, some of his shots were going sideways, and two early birdies seemed like a distant memory.And that thing he promised about controlling himself on the golf course? One bad swing on the par-3 sixth took care of that.“Tiger, you suck,” Woods muttered, before adding a curse for good measure. All caught by the CBS microphones, of course, for the listening pleasure of millions watching an afternoon of Masters drama play out on a gorgeous Saturday.Informed that he cursed, Woods said, “Did I? If I did, then I’m sorry.”Being Tiger Woods once meant never having to say you’re sorry. So count that in Woods’ favor, even if weeks in therapy haven’t changed everything about the world’s greatest golfer.Indeed, after a wild round left him still within striking distance on Sunday, it was clear one vital thing was still the same—Woods still has the resolve that made him so feared for so many years.“That’s fine. That’s never a problem,” Woods said, referring to his mental toughness before repeating himself for emphasis. “That’s not a problem.”No, the problem was the swing that had served Woods so well in the first two days of his comeback from a scandal that sent him into rehab for reasons he refuses to disclose. The putter disappeared for long stretches, too, in an erratic round that seemed to confound Woods as much as it did his mother.Kultida Woods couldn’t do anything about it, though she offered a running commentary to Nike chairman Phil Knight as they followed her son around the course, and following them was a uniformed deputy sheriff.After Woods hit his first putt up a big hill and well past the hole on No. 6, she explained to Knight that the putt was just too tough.“If you do not putt it hard it will come down,” she said. “It’s a hard putt. A hard putt.”Missing from the small entourage was Woods’ wife, Elin, but that was hardly a surprise. How things stand between Woods and his wife only they know, though it wouldn’t be hard to guess that the marriage remains a work in progress.It’s not hard to guess what this Masters means to Woods, either. Returning to the place he feels most comfortable was a big step in his comeback from public ridicule, and getting into contention after two rounds was an even bigger step in proving he still has his magic touch.Saturday wasn’t nearly as easy, despite two birdies on the first three holes that moved Woods to within one shot of the lead. He had struggled on the practice range, and the swing was not there once play began no matter how hard he tried to find it.He was seven shots back and heading in the wrong direction when he plunked it in the sand on the par-3 12th. But he got up-and-down for par, then went birdie-birdie-birdie before following a bogey on No. 17 with a birdie on the final hole.The final tally was seven birdies and five bogeys, but it could have been a lot worse. It left him tied for third, four strokes back of Lee Westwood and three behind Phil Mickelson.More importantly, it left him with a smile on his face as he walked off the 18th green.“I fought as hard as I possibly could to get myself back in the ballgame,” Woods said. “At one point I was seven back and to fight back there and to get it where I’m only four back right now was a pretty big accomplishment.”Fighting back seems to be a recurring theme here for Woods, who the day before likened his return to golf to that of Ben Hogan following the 1949 car accident that nearly took his life. That was an unfortunate comparison at best, considering his own accident resulted in just five stitches to his lip and was of his own making.Then there’s the Nike ad that invokes the voice of his late father. Woods thinks it’s “apropos.” It’s not. It’s creepy and exploitative, with the words of Earl Woods taken out of context.None of that bothered the thousands who swarmed around him on every hole Saturday, trying to get a look at Woods in action. They cheered for him from the first tee to the 18th green, excited to see him in the mix again.Woods seemed almost as excited to be there himself, on a day when roars cascaded across Augusta National and it felt more like a final round. He was in contention again, and he seemed as if he almost couldn’t wait to get to the driving range to figure out what was wrong with his swing so he could fix it for Sunday.There may be a few curse words then, too. Woods, after all, is new to the gentleman part of a gentleman’s game.Fans may cover their ears, but no one will cover their eyes. Woods in red on Sunday in the next-to-last group at the Masters is compelling enough even in normal times.And if the last five months have proved anything, these are not normal times.Except for watching Phil Mickelson slip into another green jacket, Tiger Woods should have few complaints about his week at the Masters.He tied a tournament record by making four eagles. He was never out of the top 10 from the opening round. He had his best 72-hole score at Augusta National in five years.“Overall, it was a good week,” Woods said Sunday after he tied for fourth.last_img read more

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