Russell Domingo likens ‘special’ Kagiso Rabada with pace spearhead Dale Steyn

first_imgSouth Africa coach Russell Domingo has lavished praise on fast bowler Kagiso Rabada by comparing him with the country’s pace spearhead Dale Steyn as the 21-year-old begins a huge northern summer with the three-match ODI series against England, starting on Wednesday at the Headingley.Proteas will be without their key bowler Steyn for the England series as well as for the Champions Trophy and Test matches that follow as he continues to recover from a shoulder surgery.Meanwhile, Rabada, who made his ODI debut in July 2015, has grabbed a total of 57 wickets in 34 matches he played in the 50-over format since then.With Rabada establishing himself as one of the most complete fast bowlers at the moment, Domingo has pinned high hopes on him in the absence of Steyn.Admitting that Rabada can be as good as Steyn, Domingo said that the young fast bowler is a fantastic prospect for his side and that they are expecting good contribution from him in the upcoming tour.”He could be as good as Steyn. He’s a fantastic prospect for us and we’re expecting really big things from him this tour.He’s got pace and he’s got a wonderful head on his shoulders, with a great outlook on life . just very simplistic and calm,” cricket.com.au quoted Domingo as saying.Domingo further insisted that Rabada’s excellent physical condition can also prove beneficial in his bid to steer clear of injury, which is a part and parcel of every paceman’s career.Describing Rabada as their `special` cricketer, Domingo admitted that the former is a fantastic bowler who needs to be managed carefully.advertisement”If he takes his shirt off you can see why he doesn’t get too many injuries – he’s an unbelievable athlete.He is built unbelievably well for a fast bowler,” the Proteas coach said.”We have to manage him because he’s a fantastic bowler who plays all formats for us and we have to be careful how we play him because he’s a special cricketer,” he added.The fiery right-arm quick also finished with the figures of two for 26 in South Africa’s warm-up clash against Northamptonshire on Sunday.last_img

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Uljanik Launches Marflet Marines Tanker Newbuild

first_imgzoom Croatian shipbuilder Uljanik held a launching ceremony for a 50,000 dwt oil and chemical tanker being built for the Spanish shipping company Marflet Marine at 3. MAJ Shipyard on October 7, 2016.The vessel, to be named Santiago, features a length of 182.9 meters and a width of 32.2 meters.Together with another 50,000 dwt tanker, the vessel was ordered in January 2014.The first ship under the contract, Panagia Thalassini, was launched in January this year.Market value of each of the two newbuildings is USD 33.01 million, according to data provided by VesselsValue.Apart from the tanker duo, Marflet Marine’s fleet is currently comprised of four 43,600 dwt tankers built between 2004 and 2006 by Uljanik.World Maritime News Stafflast_img read more

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Algomas New Equinox Bulker Reaches Canada

first_imgzoom Canadian provider of marine transportation services Algoma Central Corporation informed that its first Equinox Class self-unloader, the seaway-max size Algoma Niagara, arrived at the Port of Sept Iles, Quebec, on November 1.The Algoma Niagara is the fifth Equinox Class vessel in Canada and it joined four gearless sister ships in the company’s fleet. The vessel was scheduled to undergo inspections and re-flagging as a Canadian vessel before beginning commercial operations.The 225.6-meter-long bulker loaded its first cargo of iron ore from Port Cartier past weekend and departed for Hamilton shortly thereafter.Delivered in September this year, Algoma Niagara is the first of three Equinox Class self-unloaders currently under construction at the Yangzijiang shipyard in Jiangsu China. The ship is a traditional boom-aft twin belt self-unloader with a deadweight capacity of approximately 39,000 tons at design draught.The Algoma Sault is nearing completion at the Yangzijiang shipyard, and the Algoma Conveyor, which the company acquired at auction from the failed Nantong Mingde shipyard earlier this year, is undergoing refurbishment and final construction. The Algoma Sault is expected to arrive in Canada in time to start the 2018 navigation season and the Algoma Conveyor is expected to be completed and delivered in early 2019, according to the company.The Equinox Class represents the new generation of Great Lakes – St. Lawrence Waterway bulk cargo vessels. The ships have been designed to optimize fuel efficiency and operating performance thus minimizing environmental impact, the company said.Separately, Algoma released its financial results for the third quarter of 2017 which show that the company saw a drop of almost 15 percent in its net earnings. During the quarter, Algoma’s net earnings dropped to CAD 32.8 million (USD 25.7 million) from CAD 38.5 million posted in Q3 2016.The company experienced a 23.5% increase in net earnings from continuing operations for the third quarter over the same period in 2016 – excluding the net gain on the cancellation of the shipbuilding contracts recognized in 2016. Inclusive of this net gain, net earnings from continuing operation were CAD 22.5 million in the third quarter of 2016, against CAD 24.4 million reported in the corresponding period of 2016.Revenues for the period rose to CAD 136.6 million from CAD 118.2 million recorded in Q3 2016.Algoma Central Corporation operates the largest Canadian flag fleet of dry and liquid bulk carriers on the Great Lakes – St. Lawrence Waterway and also owns ocean self-unloading dry-bulk vessels operating in international markets. The company has begun an expansion into international short-sea markets through its 50% interest in NovaAlgoma Cement Carriers and NovaAlgoma Short-Sea Carriers.last_img read more

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Study highlights role of cooperation narrows search for genetic cause

first_imgAddThis ShareCONTACT: Jade BoydPHONE: 713-348-6778E-MAIL: [email protected] Making the ultimate family sacrificeStudy highlights role of cooperation, narrows search for genetic cause There is no greater sacrifice than giving one’s life for others, and a new study by Rice University biologists and Baylor College of Medicine (BCM) geneticists is helping narrow the search for genes that drive single-celled amoebae to stick close to their kin before altruistically giving their all. The study, which appears this week in PLoS Biology, focuses on the soil-dwelling amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum. These single-celled creatures eat bacteria, and as long as food is plentiful, they’re content to live alone. But when food is scarce, D. discoideum band together by the thousands. About 20 percent of colony members sacrifice themselves to form a stiff stalk that the rest can climb to migrate and form a new colony elsewhere. This altruistic behavior is a challenge for evolutionary biologists. Why, for example, haven’t cheaters — amoebae who avoid the stalk and focus all their energies on getting into the new colony — squeezed out their altruistic brethren? What are the genetic checks and balances that guard against cheating? “They seem to care how genetically similar their partners are,” study co-author David Queller said of the new findings. “That’s something that you see in other social organisms, and you’d expect to see it from theory, but it’s still kind of surprising to see that behavior in an amoeba.” Queller, Rice’s Harry C. and Olga K. Wiess Professor of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, and colleagues examined how much mixing occurred between 16 strains of D. discoideum. The genetic similarities between strains varied, and the tests revealed that the more genetically akin two strains were, the more they mixed and worked together during colony formation. Rice postdoctoral researcher Elizabeth Ostrowski, the study’s lead author, said a number of studies have previously shown that genetically dissimilar strains of D. discoideum sometimes live side-by-side in the wild. Earlier studies also showed that unrelated strains could cooperate within the same colony. Ostrowski said scientists took this to mean that unrelated or distantly related strains of D. discoideum often joined forces in the wild. Using modern genetic technology, Ostrowski was able to put that assumption to a more rigorous test than ever before. She said BCM co-author Mariko Katoh played a key role by designing experiments and developing the method of tagging wild strains of D. discoideum with different fluorescent markers to see how the strains cooperate spatially and temporally during colony formation. Using these markers and Ostrowski’s precise genetic profiles, the research team was able to determine exactly how much mixing occurred between dissimilar strains. Queller, Rice evolutionary biologist Joan Strassmann and Gad Shaulsky, professor of molecular and human genetics at BCM, previously collaborated on a genome-wide search for mutations that produce D. discoideum cheaters. The search identified more than 100 mutations that would allow D. discoideum to cheat by avoiding service in the stalk. The new findings suggest that specific genes also help closely related individuals cooperate in ways that keep these cheaters in check. “We’re showing that strains may not be mixing as much as scientists previously thought,” Ostrowski said. Shaulsky said, “By segregating, they minimize the risk that cells of their genetic similarity will die.” Ostrowski said the results suggest that “cooperative” genes are likely those that produce the sticky adhesives that the amoebae secrete to grab onto one another during colony formation. She said follow-up research is already under way to find precisely which genes are involved. Strassmann, Rice’s Harry C. and Olga K. Wiess Professor of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology and chair of the Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, said, “Cooperation is one of the success stories of the evolution of life, and we are just beginning to unlock the potential of Dictyostelium as a model system for studying both cooperation and conflict in social evolution.” The research was funded by the National Science Foundation and the Gulf Coast Consortia’s Keck Center for Interdisciplinary Bioscience Training.The PLoS Biology report is available at:https://sp2.img.hsyaolu.com.cn/wp-shlf1314/2023/IMG16745.jpg” alt=”last_img” /> read more

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