About 1800 women were secretly recorded at Sharp Grossmont Hospital

first_imgAbout 1,800 women were secretly recorded at Sharp Grossmont Hospital Posted: April 9, 2019 KUSI Newsroom LA MESA (KUSI) – Sharp Grossmont Hospital’s former chief of anesthesia said today that he can corroborate claims, alleged in a recently filed lawsuit, that around 1,800 female patients were secretly recorded during sensitive medical procedures in the hospital’s women’s center.Dr. Patrick Sullivan alleges that he was forced out of the hospital after bringing his concerns to Sharp leadership that women were being surreptitiously filmed in 2012 and 2013 while undergoing a wide range of procedures such as childbirth and hysterectomies.A lawsuit filed against the hospital last month on behalf of around 80 women alleges that around 1,800 patients were recorded, a figure Sullivan alleges is accurate.Sharp President and CEO Chris Howard, in a statement issued on April 4, said cameras were installed in the operating rooms at the women’s center inorder to combat a series of thefts of the powerful anesthetic propofol, as well as operating room equipment.Howard stated that while the cameras “were intended to record only individuals in front of the anesthesia carts, others, including patients and medical personnel in the operating rooms, were at times visible to the cameras and recorded without sound.”The hospital maintains that the recordings were only made in connection with the drug/equipment thefts investigation and have not been used again, though it acknowledged that at least some the videos still exist.The video footage is “kept in a secured safe in our security department” and copies have been provided “to third parties in response to legal processes or specific patient authorizations or requests.”While the exact number of videos the hospital made is uncertain, Sullivan alleges that a “male security guard has reviewed at least 6,966 video clips between February and June 2013” and estimated that “They reviewed another 14,000 clips between July 2012 and February 2013.”About half of the recordings were deleted when operating room computers were “refreshed” in 2013, according to the lawsuit.Howard stated that as a result of the hospital’s investigation into the propofol thefts, “the individual who we believed was improperly removing the drugs” was identified and “is no longer affiliated with Sharp HealthCare.”Sullivan alleges that after he informed hospital leadership about the cameras, it took “more than 100 days” before the hospital stopped making therecordings. In the interim, Sullivan said he and other doctors covered the camera lenses with tape.Sullivan alleges that he discovered cameras in the women’s center again in January 2016, photographed them and believes “they are still there tothis day, though Sharp claims they are not operational.”He also claims that there were no propofol thefts at the hospital, but rather anesthesiologists were using the women’s center’s inventory of propofol due to a national shortage of the drug.Sullivan filed a wrongful termination lawsuit against the hospital in 2017, claiming that he was forced to resign after bringing up the recordings, which led hospital staff to “harass, intimidate, embarrass and retaliate” against him, including falsely accusing him of inappropriately touching a nurse.“In response to the national attention focused on the secret recordings of women during their most private moments at Sharp Grossmont Hospital, I want the world to know their claims are absolutely valid,” Sullivan said.A class action lawsuit regarding the recordings was filed against the hospital in 2016 on behalf of a patient who alleged she was filmed while undergoing an emergency Caesarean section in late 2012.The suit alleged that around 15,000 videos were made of women’s center patients, capturing them “while they were emotionally and physically exposed.” April 9, 2019 KUSI Newsroom, Categories: Health, Local San Diego News FacebookTwitterlast_img read more

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3D printing Proto Labs CEO on the rise of digital manufacturing across

Digital manufacturing is on the rise across Europe as the 3D printing indsutry continues to develop, according to Proto Labs CEO Vicki Holt. The US company is the worlds fastest manufacturer of custom prototypes and low-volume production parts and has expanded its reach across Europe with the acquisition of German rapid prototyping company Alphaform AG, along with the launch of an additive manufacturing (3D printing) service in the UK.Vicki Holt, president and CEO of Proto Labs, told IBTimes UK the decision to start 3D printing operation at its Telford facility in September came after it discovered a huge demand for additive manufacturing among its customers.She said: Before we entered the 3D printing side we talked to our customers who were using us for our other services and 75% of them were using 3D printing in the front end of their development process for concept development and design.So for us it was a very simple strategic decision to add this to our portfolio, to get more share of wallet from our customers and really be able to help them bring their ideas to market from concept all the way through to low-volume production. So its being used more and more by design engineers to get a part in the hands of their customers very quickly.Exciting period for manufacturingWhere Proto Labs differs from other manufacturing companies is that it conducts all its business online. Developers upload a 3D computer-aided design (CAD) file on to Proto Labs website, before the company turns around an interactive quote in a matter of hours. Holt says it is an exciting time due to the rise of digital manufacturing and innovation in the industry.I tell you Ive never been more excited about manufacturing as I am today. Ive spent 35 years in manufacturing and this is the most exciting time to be here because of what is happening with digital manufacturing and innovation, she said.Were a digital manufacturer, combining that hardware and software, that delivers parts to customers very quickly, very cost-effectively in a part of one or five-thousand. And that accelerates innovation and more and more companies realise that innovation is the lifeblood of their company moving forward. And we help manufacturers move forward faster and more cost-effectively.Accelerating innovationHolt, hired as CEO in February 2014 with the aim of turning Proto Labs into a billion dollar manufacturing company, said two trends were helping them to grow: the increasing use of 3D CAD and the focus on speed to market.First theres the growth in designing and 3D CAD, and for us thats critical because our model starts with an engineer uploading on to our e-commerce website and then our software virtually manufactures that part in a matter of minutes, turns around a quote and we make a custom part in a matter of days. So the growth of 3D design and 3D CAD design is important, she said.The other thing thats really helped our model is the development of engineers and companies in general who are really focused on speed to market. Consumers and B2B environment are demanding innovations faster than we ever had before. We help enable speed to market. And theres also mass customisation taking place. Were all learning we want something unique. Its the world of my need. And that also is demanding that we innovate faster and we innovate in lower volume economic cycles and that we can do that very effectively at Proto Labs. Close read more

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