Masilo makes it easier for girls to stay in school

first_imgAs founder and managing director of Krystal Clear Vision, Vanessa Masilo (far right) hopes to be a constant motivator for young girls and instil self confidence and attitude that would allow them “to face life’s challenges head on”. (Images: Play your Part Reporter)Vanessa Masilo is grateful for and proud of her success. Prompted by this, the businesswoman and Play Your Part ambassador wanted to give back to the community of Vredefort, where she grew up – and she elected to help girls stay in school by supplying them with sanitary towels.Many underprivileged girls and young women in South Africa struggle to balance their education with the pressures of growing into womanhood and it is not uncommon for them to miss weeks of school because they cannot afford sanitary towels.“For many of us, buying sanitary pads is as easy as buying bread and milk. But this is not the case for many young girls and women in South Africa,” said Masilo, the founder and general manager of Krystal Clear Vision.To achieve her goal, Masilo enlisted the help of a number of different NGO and government organisations, such as Brand South Africa, the Free State government and the Ngwathe ANC Youth League and Women’s League.Vanessa Masilo and Ngwathe District Mayor Joey Mochela with South African musician DJ Sbu who was on hand to share some of his own lessons with the young girls.Called the Pad Drive, funds were raised from donors in the various towns of the Ngwathe district. Sanitary towels were bought with the donations, and the partners gathered in Vredefort’s town hall on 2 November for their handover.The Pad Drive had raised enough funds to supply five months’ worth of sanitary towels to each of the girls at the handover in the jam-packed hall, said Masilo. Through it, Masilo and partners hoped to restore some dignity to these girls and ensure that no child missed a day of school because of her sanitary needs.“I don’t regret being a woman or being a mother, because I see the value of being a girl today,” said Ngwathe District Mayor Joey Mochela. “I want all of them to make the most out of Vanessa’s efforts and do their best in school. As elders it is our responsibility to make sure that this generation is better than us.”“My dream is to see young people back in their communities saying ‘I’m going to make a difference,’” said Masilo offering more on what motivates her to make a difference.MAKING A HABIT OF GIVING BACKAs a Play Your Part ambassador it is no surprise that the Pad Drive was not the first time Masilo and Krystal Clear Vision gave back to the community and make a telling difference in people’s lives.She also helps to build fond memories of school for girls in Free State by lending good, second-hand dresses to girls in need so that they can attend their matric farewells. “I have dresses which I lend to less privileged girls annually and these dresses are worn at their matric farewells,” Masilo explained.“After the matric farewell the dresses are returned to me and the next year other girls get to borrow the dresses so they rotate.“I believe that at that stage of a learner’s life, all they should be worrying about and stressing about is their books and how they intend on performing and passing their matric exceptionally.”In her capacity as managing director of Krystal Clear Vision, Masilo hopes to be a constant motivator for young girls and instil self confidence and attitude that would allow them “to face life’s challenges head on”.“As a businesswoman and a product of the Free State, I asked myself how I could give back to my community. My dream is to see young people back in their communities saying ‘I’m going to make a difference.’”last_img read more

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Infographic: South Africa’s small businesses see growth ahead

first_imgA survey by South Africa’s National Small Business Council reveals that the country’s entrepreneurs are upbeat about the health and future success of their companies.        Small business remains the engine of growth in South Africa. They created 50% of all new jobs and contributed 45% of GDP. (Image: Brand South Africa)Words by Sulaiman PhilipDesign by Sandile KhumaloSouth Africa’s National Small Business Council recently released its survey of entrepreneurs’ take on the country’s business environment. Despite tough economic times, 90% of respondents were optimistic about the health and future success of their companies. Other findings from the survey of almost 18 000 business owners were:• 56% of small business owners thought trade with Africa was the way to growth for any small business• Most thought marketing was the skill they lacked the most• 69% of small businesses did not have business insurance• Access to funding was the biggest challenge for businesses younger than five yearsAccording to NSBC founder and chief executive Mike Anderson, small business can unlock job opportunities – to make a positive and lasting impact on South Africa. The NSBC encourages entrepreneurship through regional workshops and support services for small business owners. With campaigns like campaigns like Small Business Friday, the council also encourages consumers to choose local small businesses over large companies.Here are some of the findings from the NSBC study.Click on the image for a larger view:last_img read more

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Will Red Hat’s OpenStack Contributions Turn To Gold?

first_imgIt’s happening again. Red Hat, which for years has dominated both the development and monetization of Linux, has turned its code contributing hand to OpenStack, the popular open-source cloud computing project. While Red Hat initially fought OpenStack, today it has become OpenStack’s biggest contributor.This bodes well for Red Hat. And for OpenStack.Source Code Vs. Source Of CodeTo understand why, it’s important to understand how commercial open source works. In proprietary software, source code matters. A developer or company writes software, locks it up under a proprietary license and sells the right to use the software. Proprietary software licensing attempts to make digital goods sell like physical goods.But in open source, being the source of the source code matters most. Since open-source developers essentially give away software for free, the key to monetization lies in being known as the source of the code, such that one becomes known as the best source of support, updates and add-on components for the software in question. Red Hat has turned this open source development and distribution strategy into more than $1 billion each year in support for Linux, a project that it heavily influences by contributing roughly double what any other vendor contributes, as the Linux Foundation’s annual Linux development report states. It may not seem like much, but Red Hat’s contribution rate of 11.9% gives it outsized influence with prospective Linux customers. No other vendor is better able to influence the inclusion of customer requirements in the Linux kernel.Now the same thing seems to be happening in OpenStack.Red Hat Gets Behind OpenStackWhile OpenStack was once controlled almost exclusively by its founder, Rackspace, today Red Hat has taken the lead on contributions to OpenStack:Source: OpenStack (Data compiled by Bitergia)Again, Red Hat’s contributions double those of the next two largest contributors, Rackspace and IBM. Again, Red Hat’s contributions put it in the pole position to profit from an open-source project.Particularly OpenStack, which has been criticized as being long on community and short on actual deployments. Red Hat isn’t particularly concerned with winning popularity contests. As a public company, it needs real customers paying real money for real OpenStack deployments. As such, it has released RDO, Red Hat’s community distribution of OpenStack (similar to Red Hat’s Fedora project for Linux), and this week Red Hat announced the availability of the Red Hat OpenStack Early Adopter Program, which provides early access to its enterprise-grade distribution of OpenStack, similar to Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL).It’s not hard to imagine Red Hat’s customer base extending their RHEL, JBoss, and Red Hat Enterprise Virtualization (RHEV) deployments to the cloud with Red Hat OpenStack.Just What OpenStack Needed?After all, this is the playbook Red Hat perfected with RHEL and has put to use selling middleware, virtualization, and now cloud. While Red Hat’s involvement offers no guarantee of success, when Red Hat sticks to markets it knows – enterprise infrastructure – using a business model that fits – enterprise hardening of community code – its success rate is pretty impressive. With $35.5 billion at stake in the cloud market, according to recent Gartner projections, making OpenStack work is a big deal.Since shifting into a true community project, OpenStack has steadily attracted new, active contributors, Red Hat chief among them. The next phase involves making OpenStack safe for the enterprise. Arguably no company has more success turning open source into a safe investment for CIOs than Red Hat. As such, Red Hat being number one in OpenStack contributions may go a long way toward making OpenStack number one with CIOs.Image courtesy of Shutterstock. Top Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hosting How Intelligent Data Addresses the Chasm in Cloud Matt Asay Tags:#Open Source#OpenStack#Red Hat center_img Serverless Backups: Viable Data Protection for … Related Posts Cloud Hosting for WordPress: Why Everyone is Mo…last_img read more

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