Charity affinity programmes “narrower” in focus

About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving.  15 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis A survey has found that charities often develop narrower affinity programmes than their for-profit counterparts.The Watson Wyatt Affinity Distribution Survey 1999 has found that non-profit organisations tend to develop narrower-based affinity programmes than their for-profit counterparts. The product bases tend to include insurance, lump sum investment, and savings products. These are all generally “simple” to understand for consumers, compared to “complicated” products such as pensions.Watson Wyatt propose four key considerations for charities thinking about developing affinity partnerships. These are customer ownership, low cost base, commerciality, and management focus. Advertisement Howard Lake | 22 May 2000 | News AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis Charity affinity programmes “narrower” in focus read more

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Aviva Community Group on Facebook hosts fundraising month

first_img  269 total views,  2 views today Advertisement Melanie May | 7 March 2019 | News Aviva Community Group on Facebook hosts fundraising month AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis8 Tagged with: Facebook Funding small charities Trainingcenter_img Aviva is providing a whole month of fundraising-focused advice on its Aviva Community Group on Facebook to provide further assistance to small charities, in particular those interested in its annual grantmaking campaign.The Aviva Community Group is a closed discussion group on Facebook with over 1,000 individuals signed up.Other small charities or rather their staff or, more likely, volunteers with an interest in or responsibility for fundraising are welcome to join the group. Aviva describes it as “a place for anyone involved in community projects, local causes and charities to connect, share their experiences and ideas, and get free support and guidance”. And of course a place to “stay updated on this year’s Aviva Community Fund”.The fundraising focus for March is part of the company’s aim to “build stronger communities that are resilient in the face of challenges so that everyone has the opportunity to thrive today, tomorrow and in the future.”UK Fundraising’s Howard Lake is the guest moderator for the month, tasked with sharing resources, opportunities and ideas. This involves posting some useful fundraising resources and examples, answering some of the group members questions, and encouraging members to share their experiences and fundraising expertise.The month has been divided into four week-long topics:digitalcommunitylegacyeventsThis is the first time that the group has had a particular theme, and fundraising took priority because it was the most commonly requested topic. It is likely that future months will be dedicated to different themes involved in running a small or grassroots charity.Which other charities and community groups are on the Aviva Community Group on Facebook? You can get an idea by looking at community projects which received funding in the recently completed 2018 Aviva Community Fund.  270 total views,  3 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis8 About Melanie May Melanie May is a journalist and copywriter specialising in writing both for and about the charity and marketing services sectors since 2001. She can be reached via www.thepurplepim.com.last_img read more

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Wells delivers state of the judiciary address

first_imgWells delivers state of the judiciary address Wells delivers state of the judiciary address Senior Editor One thing two years as Chief Justice of the Florida Supreme Court has taught Charles Wells is “to stop saying I’ve seen it all.”Wells, speaking at the annual Judicial Luncheon at The Florida Bar convention last month in Boca Raton, recalled that his 2001 speech came in the wake of the election court cases of December 2000 and a raucous but ultimately positive 2001 legislative session.Although it would be hard to imagine what stranger things could happen, “who could imagine how true that could be with September 11?” he asked.That left the courts struggling with anthrax scares, instances where courthouses had to be temporarily closed, and challenges from a state budget shortfall intensified by the terrorist attack.“The one thing that experience had in common with what we experienced in the election controversy is the people in this nation and this state look to the courts to be institutions of stability in this society,” Wells said. “And the courts are fulfilling that function and will continue to fulfill that function.”Although there’s been continuing concern about possible legislative incursions and cutbacks into court functions, Wells said the legal system has actually done well as legislators learned about the courts and what they do. He noted that the courts had relatively few cutbacks in last fall’s special budget cutting session and that lawmakers have approved more than 40 new judges in the past couple of years.He credited Senate President John McKay, House Speaker Tom Feeney, Senate Judiciary Chair Locke Burt, R-Ormond Beach, Sen. Anna Cowin, R-Leesburg, who chaired the Senate appropriations subcommittee that oversees the court budget, Sen. Skip Campbell, D-Tamarac, Rep. Randy Ball, R-Titusville, and “our most valuable player, [Rep.] Dudley Goodlette [R-Naples], who was there time and again.”The Chief Justice added, “We had a good, strong group of legislators who were first term legislators who were lawyers and who were willing to stand up and do things on behalf of the judicial system.”The recent events and legislative efforts have underscored what too many lawyers take for granted, Wells said.“When I practiced law for my career, I didn’t ever take full cognizance of the fact that lawyers are dependent on having the court system; a well-funded, effective, and efficient court system so lawyers can do what lawyers do in representing their clients,” he said. “It’s much like doctors have to have hospitals.”Wells, who steped down as chief justice July 2 when Justice Harry Lee Anstead assumed the post, said there are many challenges remaining.One is the implementation of a 1998 constitutional amendment that will have the state pick up much more of the trial courts funding from counties. That cost could reach $500 million.The Supreme Court itself is faced with a high caseload, Wells said, which has grown from just over 1,900 in 1994, when he and Anstead joined the court, to almost 3,000 last year. “That requires a great deal of perceptive administration within the court itself,” he noted.Another concern, Wells said, is the amount of time it takes for the Supreme Court to issue a ruling. “We’ve got to work on getting our cases out of the court in a reasonable period of time,” he told the luncheon attendees. Part of the problem is handling capital cases, of which where are 187 pending at the court. And of the more than 380 people on Death Row, more than 100 have been there more than 17 years.Challenges can be personal as well as legal. Wells reported that this year the court is losing both Justice Leader J. Shaw, Jr., dean of the court, and Justice Major B. Harding, the second longest serving justice, to retirement. And long-time Deputy State Courts Administrator Dee Beranek recently retired.Wells closed his talk by recalling his law school commencement, delivered 37 years ago by then Florida Bar President Chesterfield Smith and how he talked about how he loved being a lawyer.In his 29 years of practice and eight years on the court, Well said, “Although there are high and low points of being a lawyer, there were juries I can tell you I was shocked to find out that did not agree with me, I love being a lawyer and I’m so appreciative of the opportunity you have given to me to serve as your chief justice. Thank you.” July 15, 2002 Gary Blankenship Senior Editor Regular Newslast_img read more

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