Nitrogen Deficiency

first_imgIn light of recent wet weather, nitrogen deficiency problems have shown up in some small grains and ryegrass fields. Excessive rain in some areas caused considerable leaching of nitrogen. These fields, along with fields where no or little nitrogen was applied in the fall, may be experiencing severe nitrogen deficiency. If several older leaves are dying and the youngest tissue is relatively pale, producers may want to top-dress with nitrogen as soon as possible.If the plants show good, green color in the youngest leaves, the producer may want to wait until the usual top-dressing time, generally mid-February to early March. A little nitrogen applied now and another application of more nitrogen later would be best for the plants, but the cost of the extra application may not be feasible. Most farmers will likely apply the full amount now. This practice is warranted where little to no nitrogen has been applied and the small grain is moderately deficient. Some lush growth may occur and suffer frost damage, but this will be less detrimental than several weeks of nitrogen deficiency.Farmers who use small grains specifically for winter grazing need to manage their nitrogen fertilization a little differently than grain producers. Ideally, for forage production, it is recommended that 120-140 pounds per acre be applied following a legume and 140-160 pounds per acre be applied following a non-legume. Split the nitrogen applications and apply half in the fall and the remainder in the mid-winter.For more information on managing pastures and hay fields, search the University of Georgia Extension publications website.last_img read more

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He’s Back! Jon Stewart Inks Deal With HBO

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York The revolution will be streamed.Jon Stewart, the famed former Daily Show host on Comedy Central whose comedic take on national politics dramatically altered the late-night TV landscape, has found a new home at HBO.The subscription-based network announced Tuesday that it has inked a four-year production deal with the comedian, who has been in semi-retirement since signing off as host of the popular satirical show in August.Under the deal outlined by HBO, Stewart will produce short-form content primarily for HBO NOW, HBO GO and other related platforms, all of which are streamed over the Internet. The network also noted that Stewart is collaborating with graphics company OTOY Inc. to develop “new technology” that will allow him to produce truncated clips on multiple platforms.“Jon Stewart led a revolution that changed the face of TV comedy on the Daily Show,” Michael Lombardo, president, HBO Programming said in a statement. “He graced our network nearly 20 years ago, so we’re thrilled to welcome back his immense talents in this next chapter of his career.”“Appearing on television 22 minutes a night clearly broke me,” said Stewart. “I’m pretty sure I can produce a few minutes of content every now and again.”The news should be music to the ears of legions of Stewart’s fans who have struggled to cope with the idea of a 2016 presidential election devoid of his often biting comedy.When Stewart’s content will hit HBO’s multiple platforms is unclear. But when it does, viewers will be able to view his comedy on HBO mobile apps and streaming devices that support HBO NOW and HBO GO, such as Apple TV and Google’s Chromecast.By signing with HBO, Stewart will join his former Comedy Central colleague John Oliver, host of HBO’s Last Week Tonight. Oliver landed at HBO after he temporarily took over the reigns of the Daily Show during Stewart’s absence as Stewart produced his first feature film, Rosewater.Stewart is widely credited with reshaping political commentary on television. He essentially built a farm team of politically minded comedians such as Oliver, Stephen Colbert and current Daily Show host Trevor Noah, all of whom contributed as so-called “correspondents” prior to hosting their own respective shows.HBO’s new superstar personality first began lecturing politicians from behind his desk as Daily Show host in 1999.HBO has been aggressive in persuing larger-than-life figures to its network. Aside form Stewart, HBO announced that it has reached a deal with respected sports writer and podcast host Bill Simmons to create a weekly show for the network. Simmons had been editor-in-chief of Grantland, popular for its long-form sports journalism and unique perspective on sports and pop culture, which ESPN recently shut down.Fans and commentators alike have speculated what Stewart’s post-Comedy Central life would look like.Now that we know, presidential hopefuls should prepare for the worst.last_img read more

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Trump announces $19 bn relief for farmers amid COVID-19 epidemic

first_imgPresident Donald Trump on Friday announced a $19 billion financial rescue package to help the agriculture industry weather the staggering economic downturn sparked by measures to defeat the coronavirus.Trump told a press conference the government “will be implementing a $19 billion relief program for our great farmers and ranchers as they cope with the fallout of the global pandemic.”The program will include direct payments to farmers, ranchers and producers who Trump said have experienced “unprecedented losses during this pandemic.” Agriculture Secretary Sonny Perdue said US farmers have been hit hard by a sharp shift in demand, as schools and restaurants close and more Americans eat at home.That has disrupted the food supply chain, forcing farmers in many places to destroy dairy output and plow under crops that no longer have buyers.”Having to dump milk and plow under vegetables ready to market is not only financially distressing, but it’s heartbreaking as well to those who produce them,” Perdue said.Perdue said some $3 billion of the money would go to buying produce and milk from such farmers, and redistribute it to community food banks.  Millions of Americans have recently turned to food pantries for meals and groceries after losing their jobs.The US farm and food industry has been hit in numerous ways by the coronavirus epidemic. Farmers are having trouble finding seasonal laborers to prepare and harvest crops; some meatpacking plants have been hit hard by COVID-19 outbreaks.But the change in the way consumers eat has had a huge impact.”Shuttered schools, universities, restaurants, bars and cafeterias are no longer buying milk, meat, fruits, vegetables and other food, causing a downward spiral in crop and livestock prices,” the American Farm Bureau said recently.Perdue praised farmers, who have enjoyed billions of dollars in support payments over the past two years due to the impact of Trump’s trade war with China, as “heroic.””Our farmers have been in the fields planting and doing what they do every spring to feed the American people, even with a pandemic, as we speak.”Topics :last_img read more

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Changing a few words doesn’t make gay marriage real

first_imgWaikato Times 22 April 2013 – Narelle HensonSame-sex marriage is not, by its very nature, the same as heterosexual marriage. It never will be. No matter how much we fiddle with the law, or censor the use of words like “bride” and “groom”, the fact that homosexual marriage does not tend toward the conception and raising of children will forever set it apart.That is why advocates of real marriage argued against the inclusion of same-sex couples, by law, into the definition of marriage. They understand that marriage plays an astonishingly important role in our society and that role is getting lost in all the mucking around with laws and words.They understand that the great purpose of the institution is to provide a framework in which a family may be created, and the next generation raised.They understand that marriage is not a “right”, just as friendship is not a “right”. Marriage is a responsibility. It is first a responsibility toward the happiness, security and trust of another, and second a responsibility to the happiness, security and trust of a child. In calling marriage a right, the advocates of same-sex marriage have turned it into an individualistic pursuit, because rights make us think about what we deserve. To call it a responsibility reminds us that true marriage is actually about what others deserve from us and, most of all, what our children deserve from us.http://www.stuff.co.nz/waikato-times/opinion/8580253/Changing-a-few-words-doesn-t-make-gay-marriage-reallast_img read more

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