Calls for solidarity with Lebanon, where freedom was murdered

first_img News February 2, 2006 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Calls for solidarity with Lebanon, where freedom was murdered LebanonMiddle East – North Africa Receive email alerts News Lebanon : Violence against reporters becoming more frequent in Lebanon French TV broadcaster Christine Ockrent yesterday hosted a Reporters Without Borders evening of solidarity with Lebanon, where newspaper journalists Samir Kassir and Gebran Tueni were murdered last year and Lebanese TV presenter May Chidiac was maimed by a bomb. RSF_en Help by sharing this information January 14, 2021 Find out more LebanonMiddle East – North Africa News French TV broadcaster Christine Ockrent yesterday hosted a Reporters Without Borders evening of solidarity with Lebanon, where newspaper journalists Samir Kassir and Gebran Tueni were murdered last year and Lebanese TV presenter May Chidiac was maimed by a bomb.Relatives of the victims and leading French and Lebanese figures took part in the event, held in the Orsay Museum auditorium in Paris, and paid homage to the victims.Tueni’s daughter, Nayla Tueni, Kassir’s widow, Gisèle Khoury, Chidiac’s sister, Micheline Chidiac Baaklini, former French ministers Michel Barnier and Bernard Kouchner, former Lebanese culture minister Ghassan Salamé, writer Amin Maalouf and Reporters Without Borders secretary-general Robert Ménard talked about these politically committed journalists and appealed to the public in France and the rest of the world to show support so that their deaths should not be in vain. Franco-Lebanese pianist Abdel Rahman El Bacha gave a recital in their memory.Ockrent opened the evening by stressing the strength of the ties of friendship and respect between Lebanon and France.Tueni, who is a journalist at her father’s newspaper, An-Nahar, said he was “the man who said out loud what hundreds of thousands of Lebanese were thinking to themselves.” His killers, she said, had wanted to silence someone who was telling his compatriots: “We, Christians and Muslims. . . united until death for the freedom and solidarity of our Lebanon.” This was a much-repeated slogan during the Beirut spring of March 2005.Khoury, a presenter at the TV station Al Arabiya, called her late husband, Kassir, “a martyr of the palace of the word,” saying he spent all his life relating what was happening in Beirut. He was full of praise for a “modern and tolerant Beirut, a city in love with freedom, which wanted to be sovereign and free of any external meddling.” She added that she expected a lot from the French investigation into his death.Baaklini read out a message from her sister, Chidiac, who could not attend herself because yesterday evening she was undergoing her 21st operation since last September’s bomb attack.Former French foreign minister Barnier said he was impressed by these “two journalists who stood up and put their lives at risk in order to participate in the awakening of an entire people, in order to demand legitimate sovereignty and freedom for their country.”Kouchner reiterated his faith in justice, stressing that even if it “is sometimes slow, it is tenacious, and the guilty will be pursued and arrested.”Salamé appealed for action, pointing out that, “the two journalists were not killed by stray bullets, they were clearly identified and their death came about because they were the bearers of a message.” He added that “political assassination must not be a weapon of government.”Maalouf compared Lebanon to a rose bush: “If you get close to the flowers, you can scratch your hands and produce blood. But even if that happens, take the time to caress the flowers.” He also called his country a synthesis of the best and the worst. “Lebanon found its reason for existence in the mosaic of its inhabitants, cultural diversity and free expression, but with the war it entered an era of communal tension, withdrawal and destruction,” Maalouf said, adding, “we must ensure that this era is just the thorn that announces the beauty of the next flowers.” Ménard said: “The injuries inflicted on Lebanon have a particular impact because of its historic friendship with France but also, in these three cases, because of Reporters Without Borders’ very close ties with Gebran Tueni and Samir Kassir.” Forum on Information and Democracy 250 recommendations on how to stop “infodemics” February 4, 2021 Find out more to go further Lebanese journalist found shot dead in car Follow the news on Lebanon Organisation News November 11, 2020 Find out morelast_img read more

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Military government deport’s leading daily’s Australian publisher

first_imgNews June 2, 2021 Find out more News June 2, 2021 Find out more RSF_en Reporters Without Borders strongly condemns the military government’s arrest and expulsion of Fiji Times publisher Evan Hannah, an Australian citizen. Hannah was arrested yesterday and deported today, in defiance of a high court order. The Suva-based Fiji Times is the country’s leading daily.“Hannah’s arrest and expulsion are unacceptable and violate all the undertakings which the military government has given as regards respect for civil liberties and press freedom,” Reporters Without Borders said. “Coming just two months after the expulsion of Fiji Sun publisher Russell Hunter, it seems that the summary removal of government critics is becoming the norm in Fiji.”Reporters Without Borders added: “The government must stop its schizophrenic behaviour, consisting of recognising that press freedom is a constitutional right, on the one hand, while continuing to harass journalists, on the other. The prime minister, Commodore Frank Bainimarama, who is quick to remind the media of their responsibilities, must guarantee their independence and respect for the rule of law.”Police and immigration officials arrested Hannah at his Suva home yesterday evening in the presence of his wife and one-year-old son. Later in the evening, his newspaper obtained a high court order for him to appear in court today, thereby blocking any possible deportation. As a result of the court order, Air Pacific refused to cooperate with an attempt by the authorities to put him on a flight to Sydney from Nadi international airport. But the authorities subsequently put him on a Korean Air flight to Seoul.The minister of defence, national security and immigration, Ratu Epeli Ganilau, said there was “credible evidence” that “Mr. Hannah’s actions were breaching national security.” He added: “Mr. Hannah was previously cautioned of the implications of his actions. He, however, chose to ignore this.”Speaking yesterday, two days before World Press Freedom Day, Prime Minister Bainimarama acknowledged that press freedom was guaranteed under Fiji’s constitution but he said “irresponsible” reporting in the past year had posed “a threat to national security.” Government and media needed to work together for “a better Fiji,” he added.Hannah is the second foreign journalist to be deported this year. Hunter, the Fiji Sun’s publisher, was deported to Australia on 26 February and is banned from going back.Reporters Without Borders voices its support for the staff of the Fiji Times, which announced today in a headline: “We won’t shut up.” The newspaper is owned by Rupert Murdoch’s New Corp. Receive email alerts Help by sharing this information Asia – Pacific News Mongolia : RSF urges presidential candidates to voice support for press freedom Reporters Without Borders strongly condemns the military government’s arrest and expulsion of Fiji Times publisher Evan Hannah, an Australian citizen. Hannah was arrested yesterday and deported today, in defiance of a high court order. “Coming just two months after the expulsion of Fiji Sun publisher Russell Hunter, it seems that the summary removal of government critics is becoming the norm in Fiji”, said the press freedom organisation. Organisation Follow the news on Asia – Pacific June 7, 2021 Find out more Pakistani TV anchor censored after denouncing violence against journalists to go further China: Political commentator sentenced to eight months in prison May 2, 2008 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Military government deport’s leading daily’s Australian publisher News Asia – Pacific last_img read more

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Saint Mary’s receives first patent for Paper Analytic Device

first_imgThe pharmaceutical industry is littered with different drugs and different versions of those drugs. While most ingredients serve a purpose, sometimes, the pharmaceuticals manufacturers buy ingredients that are of low-quality or even inactive that lower the effectiveness of the drug.To solve this issue, Saint Mary’s professor of chemistry and physics Toni Barstis worked with Notre Dame professor of chemistry and biochemistry Marya Lieberman, Notre Dame Duda Family professor of engineering Patrick Flynn and a team of Saint Mary’s researchers to develop a device that detects these ingredients — a device which received the first patent ever awarded to Saint Mary’s.The patent is for a Paper Analytical Device (PAD), a chemically-treated card-like device that can can detect multiple chemical components in a pill or capsule, including substitute drugs or fillers that may be added in place of an active ingredient.The PAD is first treated with reagents, chemicals which help detect the chemical composition of pharmaceuticals. It then is scraped across the suspicious drug and subsequently dipped in water. The water moves up the device and allows the chemicals and the drugs to mix. This reaction produces colors which indicate the composition of the pharmaceutical.Barstis said she was inspired to research the PAD after she audited a fabrication course at Notre Dame.“I simply fell in love with devices,” she said. “I wanted to explore ways to combine my love of chemistry with my new love of fabricating devices, so I reached out to my friend at NDnano, affiliated faculty member Dr. Marya Lieberman. Together, we developed what is now referred to as the ‘PADs Project.’”Receiving a patent for the first time felt “fantastic,” she said.“For me, this was a dream come true.”According to Barstis, the Saint Mary’s team that worked on the PADs project is currently working on two more projects. They are screening over 600 pharmaceutical samples collected in Nepal this past summer and examining a second patent application for the College, which involves a different fabrication and design of a PAD.Tags: PAD, paper analytic device, patent, saint mary’slast_img read more

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