I Am Big Brother

first_imgI started wearing one of those fitness trackers recently—the kind of watch that monitors the number of steps you take in a day, keeps track of your various workouts and monitors your sleep patterns. I’m admittedly late to the game with these wearable fitness trackers, as it seems like every grandma in the grocery store is checking her Fitbit for a step count. I pride myself on being a late adopter to most technology, jumping on the bandwagon just as the technical trend is about to be usurped by something better. See my Napster account and state of the art VHS/TV combo as proof. But when I finally do adopt yesterday’s hot trend, I go all in. It took me a long time to acquiesce to Strava, but now I can’t imagine taking a ride without turning it on. If I’m not going for KOM, then what’s the point? So, I’ve been geeking out on this fitness tracker, digging into all of the data that it’s been collecting on me throughout each day. I’ve learned that I don’t walk nearly as much as I should. I’m lucky to reach half of my 10,000-step goal on any given day, largely because I work from home and going back and forth between the fridge and the couch doesn’t add up to a lot of steps. I’ve learned that swimming for 30 minutes and running for 30 minutes burn about the same amount of calories. I’ve learned that there’s no reason for me to be tired every day, because I actually get way more deep sleep than the average adult. It’s fun to get nerdy on all the data these fitness trackers can mine from your day, but much like Strava, there’s a dark side. It’s turning every aspect of my life into a competition. I find myself taking the long way to the refrigerator in order to log more steps than I logged yesterday. I want that digital badge the fitness tracker’s app sends me when I finally meet my step goal. I hear it’s amazing. I can take a look at a week’s worth of sleep and eliminate the factors that led to a restless night in bed. Now I know that when I have three cocktails at 10pm, I get much less deep sleep. I want that deep sleep badge, so I cut out the cocktails. This is what you’re supposed to do with a fitness tracker. Analyze the data and make adjustments to be the best version of yourself. On the surface, this sort of competition is good. The fitness tracker is making me walk more. Rumor has it that walking is healthy. But it’s also exhausting. Not the actual walking, but the caring about the walking. That’s what’s exhausting. Giving a shit. Giving every aspect of your life a goal, from your sleep to the number of bowel movements you have in a day, then obsessing over hitting those goals…that’s exhausting and I’d argue pretty unhealthy. Granted, that obsession is all on me. I’m the one that’s turning every aspect of my day into a competition. That’s a my bad situation, but the fitness tracking industry is definitely an enabler here. Still, I dig having all that data at my disposal. Although I feel there’s an aspect to these wearables that’s missing. They can count calories and log steps and measure heart rate, but they can’t quantify stoke. That feeling you get before going over a big drop on a mountain bike, or riding the first chair on a ski lift, or waxing your board on the beach before hitting the water…that combination of fear, excitement and anticipation. Imagine a wearable that tracks the number of times you’re stoked in a day. That’s a better measurement of a healthy life. Show me a tracker that can do that, and I’ll happily fork over my hard-earned money for it. Eventually. Just before it’s being replaced by something better.last_img read more

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Elementary school students fingerprinted after knife found on campus

first_imgAuthorities are reporting that students at Grassy Waters Elementary School in West Palm Beach were fingerprinted after school administrators found a kitchen knife in a student’s backpack.According to the report, the incident occurred earlier this week in a 5th grade classroom.Officials did not say how the knife was discovered, however, they did report that none of the students in the classroom would claim the backpack or the knife.Authorities then circulated small pieces of paper to students in the classroom and had each student put their fingerprints on the paper.Officials say those fingerprints have since been destroyed and that police had no true intention of using the fingerprints as part of the investigation.The Principal of the school has since sent out a notice to parents apologizing for the incident and saying it is “not something that the school district condones.”The police department is currently investigating both the discovery of the knife and the handling of the situation.last_img read more

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4 LANTERNS ULSTER SENIOR LEAGUE: RESULTS, REPORTS AND TABLE

first_img4 Lanterns USL Results & Reports 11.05.14ResultsDrumkeen Utd   3   3   Swilly Rovers Fanad Utd.   1   4   Cockhill CelticDerry City Res.   2   0   Bonagee Utd.Letterkenny Rovers   Finn Harps Res. ReportsAll Square in DrumkeenDrumkeen Utd. 3Swilly Rovers 3Swilly Rovers were the visitors to St Patricks Park for this Thursday evening game. Before the match started a minutes silence was observed in memory of the late Willie Mc Laughlin who sadly passed away last week. The game got off to a lively start with four goals in the first half hour, Drumkeen went ahead after five minutes when Eunan Kelly headed home a Darren Cassidy corner. This was Drumkeen’s second corner and, by that stage Swilly had also won a free kick and corner which were both taken by Laurence Toland and both easy for Paul McAuley to deal with, The home team then had a couple of more chances with Conor Carlin and Ronan Coyle both shooting wide. Swilly were level after twelve minutes. Laurence Toland went down under a challenge from Ryan Gildea and referee Paul Duddy awarded a penalty. Calvin Mooney took the spot kick which hit the cross bar and bounced down into the net. Shortly after that at the other end, Carlin had an effort saved by John Roulstone. Swilly then took the lead after Twenty minutes, Paul McAuley took a free kick which had been awarded for offside and unfortunately for him his free went straight to Calvin Mooney who fired it home for his second goal of the game. Mooney grabbed his third goal on the half hour after he was played in by the impressive Laurence Toland. The play was switching from end to end and Gary Patton headed over at the other end, Drumkeen finished the half strongly forcing Swilly to concede several corners.They started the second half in the same fashion and had efforts from Carlin and Cassidy which both went over the bar and Darren McCready forced a save from Roulstone. All their pressure paid off in the 52nd minute when Gary Patton pulled a goal back when he scored from 12 yards after the ball had been laid back to him. Swilly who had been very lively in the first half seemed to run out of steam in the second half and Drumkeen had the best of the last half hour although Laurence Toland did have an effort that went wide on 75 minutes. With 15 minutes left Mickey Rogers had used up all his 3 allowed substitutes. One of those who came on was Gavin Reilly and he was involved in the equaliser with less than 10 minutes remaining he surged forward and passed it to Gary Patton on the right wing, Patton’s cross found Conor Carlin who slotted it home for the equaliser. That set it up nicely for the last few minutes but neither side could find a fourth goal to claim the three points. Paul Duddy blew the final whistle and both teams had to settle for a point. This wasn’t really a three all thriller but it was a good enough game to watch. Both managers will probably be disappointed with the result as a point was not much use to either team in their quest to close the gap on Cockhill, The games don’t get any easier for Drumkeen as their next one is away to Cockhill. DRUMKEEN- Paul McCauley, Mickey Carrol, Benny Bonner, Ryan Gildea, Eunan Kelly, Philip Whyte, Darren Cassidy, Darren McCready, Conor Carlin, Ronan Coyle, Gary Patton. SUBS -David Shovlin on for Whyte 63mins, Brian Mc Grory on for Bonner 63mins,Gavin Reilly on for Gildea 70 mins, Peter Mc Namee, Justin Deasley,SWILLY- John Roulstone, Darren Dunworth, Gareth Colhoun, Marty Boyce, Dylan Hegarty, Ryan Shields, Jordan Toland, Marty Mc Daid, Michael Mc Hugh, Laurence Toland, Calvin Mooney, SUBS- Ryan Mc Daid on for Ryan Shields, Cathal Diver on for Mc Hugh 80 mins, David Aina, Mark Wilson.Champions Collect another 3 PointsFanad Utd. 1 Cockhill Celtic 4League leaders Cockhill Celtic overcame 10 man Fanad United in an entertaining game at Traigh-a-Loch. The visitors started the stronger and took the lead in the 10th minute. Garbhan Friel latched on to a long ball before cutting inside Declan Sweeney and powering his shot into the far corner of the net. The goal seemed to spark Fanad into life and they started to apply pressure themselves. This pressure paid off in the 20th minute when Oisin Hasset broke through the defence only to be taken down by Gavin Cullen. Cullen was certainly lucky to only receive a yellow card for the incident as Hasset was through on goal. Brian McVeigh subsequently gave Cullen no chance with his penalty. Fanad had young keeper Shane Graham to thank for keeping the scores level at the break when he made 2 excellent saves in the 32nd and 35th minute. First from a Malachy McDermott shot and then from a Mark Moran shot.The second half started in a similar fashion with Cockhill having most of the possession while not creating any clear cut chances. The game changed in the 60th minute when James McCahill was adjudged to have fouled Mark Moran in the box. McCahill was then shown a straight red card for arguing about the decision. Garbhan Friel made no mistake with the penalty sending Graham the wrong way. 5 minutes later Friel should have completed his hat-trick only to see his shot blocked on the line by Declan Sweeney. A minute later Glenn McNulty blocked Gerry Gill’s shot on the line. Cockhill increased their lead in the 79th minute when James Bradley finished to the net after Graham had saved Friel’s shot. Garbhan Friel wasn’t to be denied his hat-trick though and in the 85th minute he finished into the bottom corner after Graham had made another good save. In the end Cockhill’s vast experience told but Fanad will point to the fact that Cullen could have been sent off earlier in the game and that might have affected the outcome. Best for Fanad were Shane Graham, Glenn McNulty and Declan Sweeney. Best for Cockhill were Mark Moran, Gerry Gill and Garbhan Friel.Fanad United: Shane Graham, Conor McGonigle (Keelin McElwaine 72), Daire McDaid, Kevin Murray, Declan Sweeney (Shay Durning 85), Glenn McNulty, James McCahill, Jordan McBride, Adam Serrinha, Oisin Hasset ( Conor Matthewson 77), Brian McVeighCockhill Celtic: Gavin Cullen, Kieran McLaughlin, Peter Doherty, Johnny Halvin, William O’Connor, Derek Doherty (Aidan O’Donnell 77), James Bradley, Malachy McDermott (Michael Noone 50), Mark Moran, Garbhan Friel (Gerard McLaughlin 85), Gerry GillRef: P CollLetterkenny Beat Harps to go 3rdLetterkenny Rovers 3Finn Harps Res. 1Letterkenny Rovers title ambitions remain on track following a hard earned 3-1 victory against a strong Finn Harps eleven at Leckview Park on Sunday afternoon.It was the home side who made a cracking start to the game netting twice in the opening 7 minutes. The game was barely 2 mins old when Chris Flanagan was robbed of possession by Oisin McMenamin down the left hand side. McMenamin powered into the box before crossing to the far post to the in rushing Kenny Doran and he got the final touch from 3 yards out despite the close attention of a Harps defender.In an exciting start Harps could have equalised just a minute later when Jason Quinn had to be at his best to deny Dean McConnell whose header was superbly tipped over by the young net minder. Rovers had Harps reeling yet again after only 7 minutes. The lively Kenny Doran did well to nip in and win the ball before being fouled by Aaron Scanlon. Doran got injured in the impact and had to be substituted 4 minutes later. Former Harps player Johnathan Minnock stepped up and scored the free from 18 yards catching Conor Winn out at the near post.The visitors did boss the rest of the first half with Matty Henry and Graham Fisher dominating midfield and would have caught the eye of the watching Harps management duo of Ollie Horgan and James Gallagher. After good efforts by Micheal Doherty and Darragh Black it was Henry who brought Harps back into the game. After some neat play involving Fisher, Black and Henry it was Henry with a sweet shot from outside the box which left keeper Quinn stranded in the Rovers goal. Packie Mailey was very commanding at centre half and Rovers created nothing more of note until the 43rd minute when Darren McElwaine had a header from substitute Matty Harkins cross just graze the topside of the crossbar with goalkeeper Conor Winn in no man’s land.The second half was a more even affair and with some dangerous set pieces Graham Fisher and Henry both went close with headers from superb deliveries by Micheal Doherty. Letterkenny came close on two occasions when Matty Harkins low shot was superbly tipped around the post by Winn on 64 minutes and a minute later Stevie Okakpo’s rasper of a shot was destined for the top corner only for Winn to show great athleticism to deny him. Lettterkenny brought on ex-Harps player Stephen O’Donnell on 70 minutes and it took no time at all for him to make an impact. His super cross from the right hand side following a quick throw in found the head of Matty Harkin who made no mistake from 5 yards out on 76 minutes. The game fizzled out after that and with Harps having no substitutes Letterkenny began to control proceedings although Micheal Doherty did force a quality save from Quinn with only 4 minutes left which could have made the game interesting if he had scoredNext up for Harps is a meeting with Derry on Tuesday night while Letterkenny are back at Leckview for a meeting with Fanad Utd on Wednesday.Letterkenny Rovers; Jason Quinn, Barry O’Donnell, Neil Lloyd, John Doherty, Johnathan Minnock, Glen Gallagher, Aaron O’Hagan, Stevie Okakpo, Kenny Doran, Darren McElwaine, Oisin McMenamin. Subs; Matty Harkin for Doran 11, Kevin McGrath for O’Donnell 45 Stephen O’Donnell for McElwaine 70.Finn Harps Reserves; Conor Winn, Christopher Flanagan, Aaron Scanlon, Packie Mailey, Graham Fisher, Matty Henry, Dean McConnell, Darragh Black, Conor McBride, Shane Buchanan, Micheal Doherty.Ref;Tommy McAreeDerry Keep Up the PressureDerry City Res. 2Bonagee Utd. 0Derry City Res. kept the pressure on league leaders Cockhill on Saturday afternoon in Buncrana after a hard fought 2 nil win over a good Bonagee outfit. Raymond Foy and Ryan Curran scored the goals that keep John Quigg’s team tucked in 3 points behind Cockhill with a game in hand as the league heads for the halfway stage.FixturesTuesday, May 13th at 7pmFinn Harps Res. v Derry City Res.   Ref. V. McLaughlinWednesday, May 14th at 7pmBonagee Utd. v Swilly Rovers Ref. P. DuddyCockhill Celtic v Drumkeen Utd. Ref. S. TonerLetterkenny Rovers v Fanad Utd. Ref. P. CollSunday, May 18th at 2pmBonagee Utd. v Cockhill Celtic Ref. T. McAreeDerry City Res. v Letterkenny Rovers Ref. S. TonerDrumkeen Utd. v Fanad Utd. Ref. V. McLaughlinSwilly Rovers v Finn Harps Res. Ref. P. Coll4 Lanterns Ulster Senior League Table 11.05.144 LANTERNS ULSTER SENIOR LEAGUE: RESULTS, REPORTS AND TABLE was last modified: May 11th, 2014 by John2Share this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Tags:Ulster Senior Leaguelast_img read more

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Water outage planned in Falcarragh for new connection works

first_imgFalcarragh residents are being advised that water will be off tomorrow, Tuesday, to facilitate the connection of a new water main.Works are continuing to replace ageing water mains in Falcarragh and progressing as scheduled, according to Irish Water.There will be a planned water outage on Tuesday, 10 December from 10am – 5pm for the next step of the project.  There will be no planned interruptions of this scale again until the New Year, an Irish Water spokesperson said. Homes and businesses in the affected areas may be impacted by water outages and reduced water pressure tomorrow. Following these improvement works, water supply may take 2-3 hours to return as water refills the network.The works will also involve laying new water service connections from the public water main in the road to customers’ property boundaries and connecting it to the customers’ water supply.The overall project involves the decommissioning and replacement of approximately 1.6 kilometres of problematic water mains in Falcarragh, along the Ballintemple Lower with high density polyethylene (plastic) ones.The Falcarragh upgrade scheme is being carried out on behalf of Irish Water by Farran’s Construction Ltd and is expected to be completed in January 2020.     Water outage planned in Falcarragh for new connection works was last modified: December 9th, 2019 by Rachel McLaughlinShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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AJ Baltes, April 9

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest We got a couple of inches of rain and some high winds and then it changed to snow. It all melted right away.There has been some flooding around here. It is pretty par for the course for this time of year though. The wheat is starting to green up and looks a little better than it did. It must be getting just warm enough for it to do something. It has been in the high 20s and night and low to mid 40s during the day. I think it is supposed to get in the 60s next week.Hopefully things start drying out so we can start getting fertilizer spread. This part of the state is usually a little later than the rest of the state with planting. We are usually a couple of weeks behind the rest of Ohio. If we can get corn in at the end of April we’ll do it but that is pretty rare for us up here.For the most part everything is pretty ready to go once we can get out to the fields. First we will try to get our bulk fertilizer spread and we do custom lime and gypsum spreading so hopefully we can get that done and out of the way. We need to try to get the wheat sidedressed too. Then we try to get the corn and beans planted — whatever fields are dry enough to get into. We’ll try to plant beans first if we can.We do a spring burndown after we plant. We plant into the cover crops green and then have a custom applicator come in and burn down right after planting. That has worked out pretty well. We don’t seem to have the slug pressure that the straight no-till guys do. The cereal rye is starting to green up but some of the other covers are just sitting there right now.Last year all you could see was the cab of the tractor going through the cover crop when we planted corn just after Memorial Day. We didn’t have any problems with it and that was some of our better corn.Then when the corn is about knee or waist high we inter-seed with covers and the mat that is there helps get that annual rye, rapeseed and crimson clover off to a good start. We broadcast the seed around sidedressing time.We have been hauling some corn out and now we are waiting on the weather.last_img read more

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DTN 2019 Digital Yield Tour – KS, MO

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest By Emily UnglesbeeDTN Staff ReporterROCKVILLE, Md. (DTN) — What’s worse — too much rain or too little? The 2019 season is putting that question to the test in Kansas and Missouri, where rainfall and flooding has challenged corn and soybean yields nearly as much as the drought that spanned both states last year.The DTN/Progressive Farmer 2019 Digital Yield Tour, powered by Gro Intelligence, is an in-depth look at how the 2019 corn and soybean crop is progressing using Gro’s real-time yield maps, which are generated with satellite imagery, rainfall data, temperature maps and other public data.On Tuesday, Gro predicts an average corn yield of 138 bushels per acre (bpa) for Missouri, and an average corn yield of 144 bpa for Kansas. Both diverge from USDA’s August crop report, which pegged Missouri’s average corn yield much higher, at 160 bpa, and dropped Kansas’ corn yield down to 135 bpa.For the soybean crop, Gro’s maps suggest Missouri’s average yield is sitting near 39 bpa right now, with Kansas’ average soybean yield near 36 bpa. Both are lower than USDA’s August estimates of 45 bpa for Missouri soybeans and 42 bpa for Kansas soybeans.You can see specific comparisons in these charts — Missouri: https://app.gro-intelligence.com/… and Kansas: https://app.gro-intelligence.com/….Because of their real-time sourcing, the Gro yield estimates update daily, so the numbers at publication time may differ slightly from those found on Gro’s website.In both states, excessive moisture is the biggest factor at play in corn and soybean yields, noted DTN Senior Ag Meteorologist Bryce Anderson. “Kansas had its wettest spring season on record — 125 years,” he noted. In Missouri, farmers experienced the wettest month of May ever in that state, on top of historic flooding along the Missouri and Mississippi rivers, he added.While that left ample soil moisture for crops in the early summer, Gro’s maps suggest that yield potential in both states, but particularly Missouri, has been hampered by late planting dates and poor planting conditions. As a result, the states’ corn and soybean yield potential is sitting near or below yields from the drought-driven season of 2018.MISSOURIGro Intelligence’s yield maps show average corn yields ranging from a low of 65 bpa in Howell County to a high of 191 bpa in New Madrid County. You can see the county-level yield map of Missouri here: https://app.gro-intelligence.com/…. The highest yields are concentrated in the southeastern region of the state known as the Bootheel, as well as the crop-heavy region of north-central Missouri, stretching along the I-70 corridor from Kansas City to St. Louis.Despite plentiful moisture, the overall corn yield estimate for the state — 138 bpa — sits just below the state’s average yield of 140 bpa last year, when drought plagued large swaths of the state.For the reason why, look no further than a second set of Gro maps, known as the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI), which use NASA satellite imagery to show how abnormally dry or lush an area is, using the 10-year average “greenness” index. See it here: https://app.gro-intelligence.com/….The NDVI map tells a fuller story of the extreme flooding and prevented planting that occurred in the state this year. Deep gashes of brown — indicating far less vegetation than usual — follow the banks of most of the major rivers in the state — the Missouri River, which cuts across the center of the state; the Mississippi, which crawls down the eastern border; and the Grand and Chariton rivers, which feed into the Missouri River in north-central Missouri.“Missouri had a double-dose flood impact this spring,” explained Anderson. “The state had its wettest month of May ever in 125 years of record-keeping, along with the sixth-wettest spring period (March-April-May) on record. Add to that the runoff in the Missouri River and Mississippi River systems, and you have the framework for a new record in flooding — and, indeed, that has occurred. Flood levels rivaled or, in some locations, surpassed, the Great Flood year of 1993.”As Gro’s NDVI map shows, areas along these rivers were left unplanted at historic rates. USDA’s Farm Service Agency estimates that more than 744,000 acres of corn were left unplanted in Missouri, as well as roughly 478,000 acres of soybeans.Those acres that did get planted vary widely in quality and planting date, noted Kyle Samp, who farms with his father in the north-central county of Randolph.“I have three crops — corn that we planted in April, corn that we planted in May and some that we planted in June,” he said.Gro pegs Randolph County’s average yield at 128 bpa this year. Samp believes his crop has the potential to be closer to his farm average of 150 bpa, but he knows many problems lurk deep inside the fields.“We have some stand issues,” he said. “And I noticed a lot of early planted corn is running out of nitrogen. That will show up in test weights.”Likewise, Gro pegs Missouri soybeans at an average of 39 bpa this year, below the 45 bpa average for the state last year. The yield range is small and tight — most of the state’s counties’ yields fall between mid-30s and mid-40s, with the best beans clustered in the Bootheel and central Missouri.Knowing how that yield potential of soybeans will play out is tough, in part because of how late many soybeans were planted, said Samp. He is still hoping his soybeans will outyield the 37-bpa average Gro estimates for Randolph County.“So many beans are still putting on blooms and still growing,” he said. “The month of August will be so important — and so far we’ve been a little more on the dry and cool end.”KANSASGro’s county yield maps for Kansas suggest corn’s yield potential is higher than it was last year, at 144 bpa, up from 129 bpa. See the map here: https://app.gro-intelligence.com/…. Yields range from a low of 86 bpa in Lincoln County to 215 bpa in Meade County. The highest yields are clustered in the southwest corner of the state, where moisture has been unusually ample — but not as extreme as central and eastern Kansas, where corn yields lag on the Gro map.“Western Kansas precipitation was above average, but central and eastern Kansas was much above average to record-wettest,” explained Anderson.The state’s NDVI map (see it here: https://app.gro-intelligence.com/…), shows some of those distinctions. Lusher-than-usual vegetation is scattered throughout the western third, while streaks of brown (empty fields) highlight flooded areas in the eastern half of the state, particularly along waterways — such as the Big Blue River and Tuttle Creek north of Manhattan and the Smoky River between Salina and Abilene.“In southeastern Kansas, the impact of heavy rain is also showing up with areas of flooded-out ground between Emporia and Coffeyville — the Neosho River Valley southeast of Emporia especially,” Anderson said.As a result, farmers are seeing wildly varying conditions, depending on planting date and rainfall this summer, noted Kyle Krier, who farms in Barton County in central Kansas. There, Gro projects corn yields to average 163 bpa — but the three counties north of it are expected to yield in the 90s, and Rice County to the east only 123 bpa.After the record-setting wet spring, the tap turned off at crucial periods like pollination and grainfill in central Kansas, which particularly hurt late-planted fields, Krier said.“I think a lot of people will be reasonably disappointed in test weight, ear girth and kernel size,” he said. “We’re missing that top end of yields on a lot of corn acres around here. Recent rainfalls have probably helped, but at some point, you can’t make up more kernels on that ear — if they didn’t pollinate, they can’t magically appear after a rainfall.”As for soybeans, Gro pegs the state’s average yield at 36 bpa, well below the 43.5-bpa average last year. With the exception of two pockets of 40- to 60-bpa soybeans in northwest and southwest Kansas, the rest of the state’s forecast yields range between 23 bpa and 45 bpa.Krier points the finger squarely at wet, delayed planting for the state’s lower predicted bean yields.“I think one of biggest reasons is the lack of early planted beans,” he said. “Planting early is when we can achieve those bigger yields. And the majority of everything got put in two to four weeks late, most on the latter side of that. I think our highest top-end yield is not going to be there this year.”On Wednesday, the digital “tour” will turn its focus to Iowa, Minnesota and Wisconsin. If you’d like your yield observations to be included in future stories, email DTN using the contact information below.ABOUT THE TOURThe DTN/Progressive Farmer 2019 Digital Yield Tour, powered by Gro Intelligence, takes place Aug. 13-16 and provides an in-depth look at how the year’s corn and soybean crops are progressing. Each day, we’ll feature crop condition and yield information from various states, which include links to the Gro yield prediction maps for those states. Yield summaries are viewable at the county level.The “tour” starts in the west, with the first day’s articles focusing on Kansas and Missouri and Nebraska and South Dakota. On Aug. 14, the tour will explore yield estimates from Minnesota, Wisconsin and Iowa. On Aug. 15, we will move into the Eastern Corn Belt — Illinois, Indiana and Ohio — before publishing a final look at Gro’s overall national yield predictions for the 2019 corn and soybean crops on Aug. 16. Readers should note that the Gro yield visuals are continually updated, while the DTN feature articles are based on the company’s yield estimate at the time the article was written. Numbers quoted in the articles may be different than those on the Gro website depending on when viewed.To see all the tour articles and related DTN stories about the 2019 crop, visit our tour site at: https://spotlights.dtnpf.com/….About Gro Intelligence: The New York-based company is focused on creating data analytics for the agriculture industry. Gro builds proprietary crop models that use satellite imagery, soil conditions, weather and other crop and environmental data to produce crop health and yield prediction numbers and visuals.To learn more about Gro, go here: https://www.gro-intelligence.com/….To read the research white paper on their modeling system, go here and select to “Download the corn yield model paper”: https://gro-intelligence.com/….Emily Unglesbee can be reached at [email protected] her on Twitter @Emily_Unglesbee(AG/ES)© Copyright 2019 DTN/The Progressive Farmer. All rights reserved.last_img read more

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Is a Ground-Source Heat Pump the Right Choice?

first_imgIn Grand Rapids, Michigan, Andy Zbojniewicz is planning a large, high-performance home that ultimately will be powered by a 15-kW solar array. The house will have more than 3,000 square feet above grade, and another 1,633 square feet in the basement. His immediate concern is how to heat and cool the house. “I was told the home was too large to heat and cool with air-source heat pumps and be comfortable,” Zbojniewicz writes in a Q&A post,  “so [I] was primarily looking at geothermal.”RELATED ARTICLESDucted Air-Source Heat Pumps from American ManufacturersGround-Source Heat Pumps Don’t Save EnergyAir-Source or Ground-Source Heat Pump?Are Affordable Ground-Source Heat Pumps On the Horizon?All About Radiant Floors To that end, Zbojniewicz sought quotes from two HVAC contractors for ground-source heat pumps. One of the contractors said the heating load would be 50,797 Btu per hour at an outside temperature (design temperature) of 7°F, and recommended a 5-ton (60,000 Btu/h) heat pump. The second company didn’t provide its load calculations, but suggested that Zbojniewicz would need two 3-ton heat pumps in order to stay comfortable. “I have a friend who is in HVAC and he feels strongly that I should have radiant tubing run in the basement to help with heating in winter,” Zbojniewicz adds, “and while I was at it I was going to run it in the mudroom, master bath, and three-season porch.” After doing some reading at GBA, Zbojniewicz realizes there are plenty of critics of both ground-source heat pumps and radiant-floor distribution systems. “Is there a better alternative to geothermal if I want to have the potential for net zero?” he asks. “If I stick with geothermal, are two 3- ton heat pumps overkill (they’re certainly more expensive)? Should I abort the radiant altogether?” That’s the topic for this Q&A Spotlight. There is nothing wrong with air-source heat pumps The outside design temperature for Grand Rapids, Michigan, is 5° or 6°F, GBA Editor Martin Holladay says, so Zbojniewicz can certainly consider air-source heat pumps. A heat pump from a U.S. manufacturer paired with a conventional forced-air duct system would be fine. Holladay suggests that Zbojniewicz read a GBA article, “Ducted Air-Source Heat Pumps from American Manufacturers.” Dana Dorsett adds, “I’m aware of a house in Vermont slightly larger than yours and slightly less insulated, in a location with a 99% outside design temp of -12°F that is heated with four ductless mini-splits. The notion that your house is ‘too large’ to heat with a heat pump is just silly. It’s the size of the heat load, not the house, that matters.” There are some pluses to a ground-source system Jon R contends that radiant heat paired with a ground-source heat pump is great — as long as Zbojniewicz doesn’t care about how much the system costs. Such a system not only provides space heating but also provides efficient water heating. “If you are looking at air-to-water geo-exchange, then you can add a water tank (thermal mass), resolving any heat pump over-sizing issue other than cost,” Jon R adds. “If very large, it can enable some use of solar PV that doesn’t involve net metering. Multi-stage or multiple heat pumps also mitigate over-sizing.” Those load calculations are probably wrong The capacity of any system that Zbojniewicz installs should be based on two factors: the climate, and how well the house is air sealed and insulated. And Dorsett doesn’t have much confidence in the heat load estimates that one of Zbojniewicz’s contractors has provided. “Don’t believe the 50K heat loss number unless it was done by a qualified third party,” Dorsett writes, “an engineer, RESNET rater etc.,  somebody who makes their living and reputation on the accuracy of their numbers rather than installing and maintaining HVAC equipment.” Even a code-minimum house of that size with a measured air tightness of 3 ach50 would have a heat load of less than 40,000 Btu per hour, he says, assuming an outdoor temperature of 0°. “The only way to stretch it to 50K would be to have excessive air leakage or excessive expanses of window area,” Dorsett says. “Your house is likely to come in closer 30K @ 0F, 36K tops and even less at +7F.” With that in mind, a heat pump with a capacity of 60,000 Btu/hour is about twice the size that Zbojniewicz really needs. The place to start, Dorsett says, is a Manual J heat load calculation, and it’s his bet that two modulating Fujitsu minisplits or possibly a 3-ton Carrier Infinity Greenspeed air-source heat pump with heating strips would keep the family comfortable. Steve Theinalienable’s experience bears that out. “My house insulation, climate, windows, and foundation insulation are almost exactly the same as yours, just a bit smaller (2200 square feet),” he says. “My design heat load at -18°C [roughly 0°F] is 18K Btu, but we had a day like that this week, and my air-source heat pump didn’t have to work that hard to keep up, so, I think it’s probably a bit conservative.” Get your house rated by a pro, Theinalienable says. Consider the all-electric option With a tight building envelope and a relative large photovoltaic system, why not consider an all-electric house? asks Armando Cobo. “I would highly advise you to consider going all-electric with an air-to-air heat pump, and hopefully installing [Energy Star] appliances and lighting, electric fireplaces and an induction cooktop,” he says. “That’s what I spec on all my houses, which are [zero energy ready homes]. Just a thought!” In fact, Zbojniewicz is trying to convince his wife that an electric fireplace and induction cooktop are good choices. Zephyr7 suggests he invest $50 or $60 in a portable, one-burner induction cooktop and experiment with it. “Have your wife play around with it,” he says. “It’s an inexpensive way to test out induction cooking. Note that not all pots are compatible with induction cooking.” Insulating the rim joist One footnote to Zbojniewicz’s efforts to obtain more accurate heat load estimates involves insulation. He’s found a company that will do Manual J calculations, but he’s not sure how to specify the insulation he will use at the rim joist. What’s the best approach? “Closed-cell [spray foam] is pretty standard for use on rim joists,” replies Zephyr7. “Lots of people use kits like those from Foam it Green and the Dow Froth-Pak. What you want to avoid is keeping the wood wet. Your assembly sounds like it won’t be a problem, but make sure you have a capillary break between the rim joist and the top of the foundation wall.” Cobo says open-cell foam is best at the rim joist when rigid foam will be applied to the outside of the wall. Because Zbojniewicz is planning to use Rockwool on the outside of the house, either open- or closed-cell foam can be used, he adds. Holladay suggests he choose closed-cell foam, not open-cell foam. “In a cold climate, closed-cell spray foam would be a better choice for the interior of a rim joist,” he says. “You’re right that either type of spray foam is an air barrier. The reason that closed-cell spray foam is better is because it is a vapor barrier, unlike open-cell spray foam. The closed-cell spray foam prevents outward diffusion of water vapor, and therefore keeps the rim joist dryer.” Our expert weighs in Peter Yost, GBA’s technical director, adds this: Cold-climate heat pumps: It is interesting to hear the misgivings that air-source heat pumps will be unable to manage either larger homes and/or cold climates. I was just in Wisconsin recently and heard the same litany. Dana Dorsett, as usual, is right on: Heating loads are assessed using U-factors and building enclosure surface areas (and other metrics, including airtightness), not square feet of living or conditioned space. In the Northeast, heat pumps designed to wring out BTUs at air temperatures well below 0°F have proven efficient and reliable. Marc Rosenbaum, a leading and inherently skeptical mechanical engineer, has helped spread the word by recounting his own great success with cold-climate air-source heat pumps. We did have problematic cold-climate heat pumps in the past (both Nyle and the Hallowell cold climate heat pumps had problems and went out of business some 10 years ago) and that news seems to persist. The technology of today’s cold-climate heat pumps is very different and has proven to be robust. (See numerous GBA resources on the topic, including this one.) Radiant-floor heating. We just can’t seem to get our arms around the pros and cons of this method of heat distribution. It is not more efficient. There is nothing magical about radiant-floor heat. Its efficiency is driven by the same physics that governs all other distribution systems. And part of the physics is the mass to which the distribution system is connected. It’s very difficult if not impossible to gain efficiency by way of thermostat setback. It is more comfortable. It’s hard to argue with this, either empirically or based on heat transfer. In my experience, well-designed and installed radiant floor heating systems deliver superior thermal comfort. Radiant-floor distribution can be used for space cooling. As Robert Bean has said more times than he cares to count: We keep blaming condensation during cooling on the radiant system when, if the latent load were properly managed, radiant cooling can work just fine (for more, see this). Insulating the rim joist: In my experience, rim joists get wet from backsplash at grade from the exterior or, less commonly, wicking because there is no capillary break between the mudsill (or sill beam) and the foundation wall. In cold climates, I don’t see rim joists getting wet from air leakage because the stack effect is pulling cold dry air in during the winter at the rim joist. So, the main reason for me to choose open- or closed-cell spray foam at the rim joist — since both can provide a good air seal at this location — is based on how much drying potential I need to the interior (open-cell spray foam being more vapor-permeable than closed-cell). Manual J: It’s really heartbreaking to hear how often heat-load calculations are not done. Can you imagine a car company designing a transmission system without knowing the horsepower and torque the engine can generate? On the other hand, it’s heartening to see how often the general public ends up on GBA’s Q&A pages to work with leading building professionals on home performance.last_img read more

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The Hustler’s Playbook: Be Indispensable

first_imgA hustler never fails to produce the necessary result, regardless of what that result might be this time. You can count on them to get done what needs to be done.A hustler takes initiative and does what need to be done proactively, before it is necessary. She is resourceful enough to find a way where none presently exists. You can count on the hustler to come up with something that works.The hustler cares more than anyone else would dare. She is unafraid to admit that she drank the Kool-Aid, that she shares her company’s cultural beliefs, and that who they are matters. She is not a cynic. Nor does she bitch or whine.The hustler goes first. If it’s a nasty, unpleasant, or difficult task, the hustler volunteers to take it. He wades in before anyone else. No one ever has to ask. The hustler just does it.The hustler isn’t a glory hound. Hustling isn’t about the accolades or awards. The hustler’s identity and life’s meaning run much deeper than that. Success is at the core of who the hustler is, with or without the press clips.You can get by without those who fail to produce results because they don’t put forth the effort. You can get by without those reactive souls who only move when some outside force acts upon them. You can live without the many who refuse to exercise their resourcefulness and their creativity and apply these greatest of human attributes to the challenge at hand. You can certainly live without the cynic and his negativity.When all the dust settles, the hustler is the last one standing. The hustler is indispensable. Essential Reading! Get my first book: The Only Sale Guide You’ll Ever Need “The USA Today bestseller by the star sales speaker and author of The Sales Blog that reveals how all salespeople can attain huge sales success through strategies backed by extensive research and experience.” Buy Nowlast_img read more

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QUEENSLAND ORIGIN SQUADS ANNOUNCED

first_imgWomen’s 30Dawn Aaskov – SCFBDTanya Bougoure – SCFBDAmanda Bourne – SWQLeanne Brooks – SQBDKim Cetinich – NQJude Dumke – SCFBDMaryanne Fisher – SQBDNatalie Leicht – SWQNatalie Leis – SQBDTheresa Lowe – NQSharlene McNamara – SWQJackie Morris – SWQBrooke O’Brien – NQKatie Pope – NQSam Ramsamy – NQKylie Robinson – SQBDSharon Searston – SQBDBritt Sharkey – NQCarene Ward – SWQDebbie Wilson – SQBDKelly Zelinski – SQBDMen’s 35s Lawrence Fisher – BCCorey Foster – SQBD Troy Great – NQCameron Hall – SQBD Dave Hartmann – BCGeoff Hooper – BCRhys Jones – BCIan Jordan – SQBD Robin Kildare – SQBD Sam Lee – BCColm Maguire – SQBD Paul Mason – CQPeter Murray – NQCraig Neilan – SWQJimmy Neilan – SWQLeigh O’Brien – NQShane Rigby – SQBD Reece Sale – NQCraig Slavin – SQBD Peter Tong – SQBD Cameron Upton – CQGraham White – SWQMatthew Wood – CQWomen’s 35s Kaye Broadfoot – SWQDeb Collingwood – BCKaren Cooksley – BC Sherry Ey – SQBDCathy Farrelly – BCSandy Gleeson – SWQBronwyn Green – SWQJayne Halvorsen – SQBDDebbie Harris-Taaffe – SQBDKaren Hegadus – SWQTammy House – CQSelena Kelly – SWQDionne Kelvin – NQSharon Kildare – SQBDAmanda Koehler – SQBDJudy McCarthy – SQBDAlison McWhirter – BCKelly Morris – SQBDMichelle Muir – SQBDEllen Pengilly – SWQLorelle Sankey – SWQTanya Shuker – CQTracey Upton – CQLexia Willmington – BCMen’s 40s Mitch Bonaventura – SQBDPaul Carmody – SWQPaul Erickson – SQBDAndrew Fox – SWQSteve Green – SQBDMook Harrington – SQBDMichael Hunter – BCDavid Kofoa – SQBDDarren Kuskopf – CQDarren Lawrence – CQJustin Lawrence – CQGreg Lisle – SWQTony Mikkelsen – CQPatrick O’Brien – BCPeter Owen – SQBDLuke Shaw – SQBDWayne Short – CQSean Slinger – BCRodney Wilson – SWQSteve Womersley – SQBDWomen’s 40s Louise Alexander – BCKatina Davis – NQHeather Desbois – NQJoyce Downes – SQBDAnna Fuiava – SQBDRhonda Grehan – SQBDHaylene Grogan – SWQ Leanne Hudson – BCVirginia Ingham – SQBDSharon Jones – SQBDKaren McNamara – CQAngie McPhee – BCLisa Miller – SQBDKerry Robinson – SQBDAlison Twiname – NQFiona White – CQCarlie Young – BCMen’s 45sBrett Allen – SQBDGreg Carmody – SWQPhil Driese – SWQKevin Flett – SWQJohn Hall – SWQWally Hanley – SWQSteve Hennessey – SQBDAndrew Hooper – SCFBDMark Jansson – SQBDAllan Jenkins – NQRon Keleher – SCFBDDarryl Lancaster – SQBDPeter Le Feuvre – NQBarry Matthews – SQBDStewart McCarther – SCFBDBill McLean – BCLes Patience – SQBDWayne Rohlf – SCFBDHank Solien – SQBDTrevor Strahan – NQBill Szaba – SQBDAshley Taylor – SCFBDGlenn Todd – SCFBDMen’s 50s Dallas Anderson – SCFBDMichael Arnold – SWQDon Baartz – BCSteven Berry – CQDavid Brown – BCRon Dejun – BCRay Downs – NQTerry Ford – SWQKev Hickey – BCGerard Kearney – NQIan Kerr – NQTony Lacaze – BCMichael Long – SCFBDIan MacLeod – SQBDRob McCarthy – BCBryan Pullar – BCGreg Purves – SWQPeter Rowe – NQMike Thoars – BCGreg Young – BC Women’s Open Kirsty Beer – CQKristy Brennan – SQBDAli Brigginshaw – BCNikki Etheridge – SWQGemma Etheridge – SWQBelinda Hammett – SQBDSamantha Hopkin – BCEmily Hopkin – BCAlyce Hulbert – SQBDShaye MacLeod – SQBDShelley Matchem – SCFBDKelly McGennity – NQTeena McIlveen – SQBDGreta Perkins – CQLauren Potter – SWQPeta Rogerson – SCFBDHayley Rogerson – SCFBDJane Royal – NQJessica Shaw – SQBDMary Steel – BCRoxanne Winder – SQBDKelly Woods – BCMixed OpenKatie Aitkins – BCJohn Andrews – SQBDMichael Baartz – BCCasey Clark – SCFBDTom Eyeles – BCLucas Feldman – BCAmy Fong – SQBDClare Giarola – SQBDTara Mako – SQBDHayley McAnelly – SQBDBen McCullum – SQBDLauren McDonald – SQBDCorey Meredith – BCLuke Parker – BCShannon Sankey – BCMissy Shaw – SQBDMen’s 20sNicholas Brigginshaw – BCKristian Congoo – NQJosh Evans – SQBDCorrie Gilbert – CQ Cody Green – BCStuart Hayes – BCRyan Jacks – BC Rhys Jacks – BCJoel Keune – CQJay Latumahina – BCGus Law – BCKeith MacDonald – SQBDBernard Matthews – BCTroy Mendham – SCFBDPeter Norman – SQBDJustin Otto – CQToby Pirini – SQBDJeremy Russo – CQKarl Skinner – SQBDDylan Taikato – SQBDDamien Townson – NQWomen’s 20s Alika Bedford – SQBDLizzie Campbell – BCEmilee Cherry – SWQRebecca Clarkson – SCFBDMegan Clarkson – SCFBDEmily Edwards – SQBDKylie Gainer – SQBDBelinda Hayes – SWQKelly Jones – BCGenevieve Lacaze – BCTallon McCarthy – BCAlyce McCloskey – CQNicole Michael – NQKimberley O’Connor – CQSavannah Pratten – SCFBDKirsty Quince – BCEmily Reed – SCFBDAlieia Spence -NQ Marikki Watego – SQBDMen’s 30s Daryl Ashton – BCColin Beckitt – NQMatt Bowe – SWQGuy Dorrick – NQLawrence Fisher – BCMatthew Flaherty – BCMichael Hall – BCMark Hartley – SQBDMark Henricksen – BCAlex Hinch – SWQTrevor Lake – BCDavid Lockhart – SQBDDamien Logan – NQTrent MacDonald – SWQJason McNamara – BCChris Neville – SWQJason Powell – CQCraig Searston – SQBDJamie Wallace – SWQKenny Ward – SWQBen Warren – CQ The 2008 Queensland State of Origin squads have been announced after the selection process was completed at the X-Blades Queensland State Regional Championships conducted in Toowoomba from October 5-7 2007.All players whose names appear in the 2008 State squads have all responded to the letter of offer forwarded to them. The squads will take part in the first of the selection camps to be conducted on December 1-2 2007 at Redlands in the lead-up to the State of Origin Series to be played in Sydney in August 2008. A number of positions have not yet been finalised with several players being on leave since the letters were forwarded.The Queensland Touch Association will update the squads when all letters of offer have been responded to.Men’s Open Troy Clark – SCFBDDrummayne Day-Berg Muir – SQBDAsh Farrow – SCFBDChris Farrow – SCFBDGian Guerra – NQPhil Gyemore – CQMook Harrington – SQBDRalph Hickman – SQBDBrett Hughes – BCNathan Jones – SQBDBrent Madders – BCKris McMurdy – SQBDJustin Mitchell – CQDamian Moar – SQBDRyan Pollock – SQBDSebe Rey – BCBen Roberts – SCFBDBen Robinson – SQBDMichael Rogers – BCGavin Shuker – CQTroy Skinner – SQBDMitchell Smith – CQPeter Stoddard – SQBDClint Withers – CQDaniel Withers – CQlast_img read more

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10 months agoChelsea boss Sarri: Morata has potential, but Hazard fulfilling my No9 needs

first_imgChelsea boss Sarri: Morata has potential, but Hazard fulfilling my No9 needsby Paul Vegas10 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveChelsea boss Maurizio Sarri admits Eden Hazard is fulfilling what he wants from a No9 ahead of Alvaro Morata.Sarri concedes Hazard and Morata are very different kinds of players, with the selection decision based on style of play and where the space on the pitch is likely to appear, as much as anything else.”I think Alvaro of course is better in the box, maybe he is better to attack spaces, but I have to say Eden is improving. As you saw in the last match, for the second goal, he attacked very well the spaces,” explained Sarri.”It is different because Eden of course is better when he comes to play with the midfielders, is better to open spaces for the wingers. It’s different, it’s another way of playing.”Alvaro’s potential is to be a very good player. At the moment, I think we need to be balanced on the pitch, we need to be more solid, and so in the last matches I preferred these solutions, but for the future everything is open I think.” About the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more

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