Dr. John, Mavis Staples, Tab Benoit, & More To Headline Big Blues Bender In Las Vegas

first_imgThe Big Blues Bender will return to the Plaza Hotel & Casino in Las Vegas, from September 7-10. This year’s lineup includes Dr. John, Mavis Staples, Tab Benoit, Walter Trout, and Anders Osborne along with Shemekia Copeland, David Bromberg, Doyle Bramhall II, Curtis Salgado, Eric Gales, Mike Zito, and so many more.Artists at large for the 2017 installment include Jason Ricci, Nick Schnebelen, Billy Price, Sari Schorr, Anne Harris, Michael Ledbetter and Monster Mike Welch. Check out the full lineup announcement video below:For more information about tickets and travel information, head to the festival’s website.Full lineup:last_img read more

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Testing homes for radon

first_imgThe program has four part-time radon educators, housed inextension offices in Gwinnett, Hall, Walton and Sumter counties.The program has also provided training on indoor air quality andradon for all extension agents in family and consumer sciences.Through the radon educators and the FACS extension agents, 5,000free radon test kits are being offered to Georgia homeowners.About 1,000 have already been issued. Testing for radon is the only way to tell whether it’s in yourhome. “If after testing the air you find elevated levels ofradon,” Atiles said, “consider testing your water if you get yourdrinking water from a well.” University of Georgia The data from the testing will help evaluate the risk of radongas for Georgians. The current EPA estimate, Atiles said, is thatone in five homes is at risk of dangerous radon levels. “Wesimply don’t know until we test,” he said. If the radon level in your home tests high, Atiles recommendstesting your home again with a similar device. An odorless, tasteless and invisible gas, radon is released bythe natural decay of uranium in soils. It can easily enter homesthrough foundations and well water. (April Reese is a student writer with the University of GeorgiaCollege of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences.) Testing for radon is easy. Get a free test kit through the UGARadon Education Program from your county UGA Extension Serviceoffice. You can buy test kits, too, from home improvement storesor from county health departments. For training in measurement and mitigation, contact the SouthernRegional Radon Training Center at 1-800-626-2703. The program will only provide one free test. You will have to buyfollow-up tests on your own. You can get them, though, at adiscounted price ($6.95) with a UGA discount coupon provided byAirChek, Inc. But through a U.S. Environmental Protection Agency initiative,the University of Georgia Extension Service and the UGA Collegeof Family and Consumer Sciences now have a program designed toshow how to test for radon in your home. Detail information onthis program is offered at www.gafamilies.com/housing. Jorge Atiles, UGA’s Extension Service housing specialist, headsthe program. “You can reduce and prevent the entry of radon inyour home,” he said. “And testing is the first step.” “About 1-2 percent of radon in indoor air comes from drinkingwater,” Atiles said. “However, breathing radon released to airfrom household water increases the risk of lung cancer over thecourse of your lifetime. Drinking water containing radon couldalso present a risk of internal organ cancers, primarily stomachcancer.” If your radon level is high, Atiles suggests contacting the UGARadon Educators Center to determine the best way to limit theradon level. The University of Georgia Center for Applied Isotope Studies(CAIS) can test water for radon. There is a fee for the test.Contact radiochemist Michael Neary (706-542-6115 [email protected]) to test your well water. According to the EPA, radon in drinking water causes 168 cancerdeaths per year, 89 percent from lung cancer caused by breathingradon released from water, and 11 percent from stomach cancercaused by drinking radon-contaminated water. A list of certified radon mitigators is on the Web athttp://radongas.org. You can learn more about radon mitigation athttp://www.radonfixit.org/. Radon causes cancer. Experts say it’s the second-leading cause oflung cancer in the United States, after tobacco smoke, killing15,000 to 22,000 people a year. Now, a new program can help youavoid it. By April Reese last_img read more

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Droves of mourners flock to Clinton to bid fallen firefighter farewell

first_imgCLINTON — The eastern Iowa town of Clinton will grow by several thousand today as a public visitation is held for the firefighter who was killed in the line of duty last weekend.Thirty-three-year-old Lieutenant Eric Hosette died in an explosion Saturday while fighting a fire at the ADM plant in Clinton. Another firefighter was critically hurt.Clinton Fire Chief Mike Brown says mourners are expected from near and far to pay their respects, adding, the outpouring of support is tremendous.“Our community really becomes an amazing place when things are bad,” Chief Brown says. “They’ve really shown that again. They’re coming in here just to hug people, just to drop off food or flowers or money and they care. They really care about these two guys and the rest of us.”Special red lighting is now illuminating the fire station at night and many residents are displaying red lights on their homes to show support for the department. Reports say local stores have sold out of the red light bulbs.Chief Brown says it’s difficult to imagine how they proceed without Hosette, but he knows they will.“We’re going to move on and we’re going to have a big void to fill but we’re going to get stronger, eventually,” Brown says. “It’s going to take a while but everybody’s doing everything they can to move forward.”The firefighter who was injured in the blast, 23-year-old Adam Cain, remains at University Hospitals in Iowa City in critical but stable condition.The chief says he’s been told by veterans from other fire departments that this death will leave a permanent mark on the department.“It is going to be changed forever but we absolutely hope that it’s going to change for the better, make us stronger, make us care for each other more, make us train harder, make us safer, make us work harder,” Brown says. “It’s going to be positive change.”He says the support has come not just from within the community but from across Iowa and from all over the nation. “How do you honor somebody’s memory? By doing something good,” Brown says. “We’ll continue to change for the better in his honor.”Adam CainHosette’s public visitation is scheduled from 2 to 8 PM today at Zion Lutheran Church in Clinton. Services for the community to honor Hosette will be held at 11:30 A-M tomorrow at the bandshell in Riverview Park in Clinton.A private family burial service will be held at the Rossiter Cemetery rural Charlotte (char-LOT) after the service. Hosette leaves behind a wife and young daughter. He also served as the fire chief in the Charlotte Volunteer Fire Department.Donations can be made to the family through a fund established at Clinton National Bank.last_img read more

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