Dr. John, Mavis Staples, Tab Benoit, & More To Headline Big Blues Bender In Las Vegas

first_imgThe Big Blues Bender will return to the Plaza Hotel & Casino in Las Vegas, from September 7-10. This year’s lineup includes Dr. John, Mavis Staples, Tab Benoit, Walter Trout, and Anders Osborne along with Shemekia Copeland, David Bromberg, Doyle Bramhall II, Curtis Salgado, Eric Gales, Mike Zito, and so many more.Artists at large for the 2017 installment include Jason Ricci, Nick Schnebelen, Billy Price, Sari Schorr, Anne Harris, Michael Ledbetter and Monster Mike Welch. Check out the full lineup announcement video below:For more information about tickets and travel information, head to the festival’s website.Full lineup:last_img read more

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Alumni teach lacrosse in Honduras

first_imgAs the children of Nuestros Pequeños Hermanos Orphanage in Honduras first approached the pile of lacrosse sticks lying on their soccer field, they giggled and wondered at the foreignness of these strange items that resembled nothing they had seen before. But after a week of learning to play under the instruction of David Earl, former Notre Dame lacrosse player and current professional lacrosse player for the Minnesota Swarm, the children fell in love with the sport. Three Notre Dame graduates: John Arlotta, owner of the Minnesota Swarm, Dr. Peter Daly, an orthopedic surgeon for Summit Orthopedics and Earl began this program several years ago when Daly got involved with Nuestros Pequeños Hermanos and visited the Honduras location to find a glaring lack of available medical care. “[Their situation] got us thinking that they really need a surgical facility that the poor can access … So over the ensuing three to four years we got the money raised and got it built and started getting all of the equipment from the facilities around,” Daly said. “Now it’s been functioning well, and it actually just started functioning on a full-time basis.” Daly, however, felt the need to not only provide medical care but to also enrich the lives of the orphans in order to provide both a healthy and a happy living situation for them. “He does a lot of different things … to encourage the kids on an ongoing basis with the foundation, if you will, being his surgery center,” Arlotta said. “Then when he goes down there … he likes to have some additional things that he brings that is beyond just doing surgeries but helps in terms of the growth and education of the kids in this orphanage.” This principle of enrichment brought about the idea of exposing a new sport to the orphans that the children usually could not access, Daly said. “The kids down there principally play soccer and really don’t have the resources and the means to be involved in a sport that’s really equipment intensive,” he said. Daly provides medical care for the Swarm, and this connection inspired the plan, and Arlotta’s connection to Daly through Summit Orthopedics allowed Arlotta to make the concept a possibility. “It was primarily a funding mechanism from our standpoint. Once the idea came from Dr. Daly, we just jumped on and provided the funding for David and the equipment,” Arlotta said. When Arlotta and Daly approached Earl, he immediately latched onto this idea that combined his favorite sport and the service-based teachings of Notre Dame. “Any way to give back to these children and to give back to the center and the orphanage would be just a privilege for me … If I can go out there and bring a sport that I love to play and love to teach and put smiles on kids faces by teaching that, I think that’s just an unbelievable opportunity in itself,” Earl said. The children received the sport well, even though it differed greatly from the sports they usually played, Daly said. “They got to use a sport that necessitates a lot of hand-eye coordination, and mostly they can’t use their hands if they’re playing soccer, so that gives them another skill, and the kids loved it,” Daly said. “The children just had a great time throwing and scooping and passing.” Earl said his trip to Honduras went beyond just lacrosse. “What was interesting to me was that lacrosse was such a small part of being out there,” Earl said. “I was able to obviously teach lacrosse to the PE classes, but outside of that I was able to just kind of get to know the kids.” Current Notre Dame lacrosse coach Kevin Corrigan implemented similar efforts to combine the sport of lacrosse with the service teachings of Notre Dame in his program many years ago and continues to do so. “We really want to make it a really kind of a university, community thing that is initiated and built around the lacrosse idea, but it has much, much less to do with lacrosse than it does with our involvement with each other and the community,” Corrigan said. Earl’s and Arlotta’s work in bringing the sport to new places and to disadvantaged people fits in with the common attitude of a lacrosse player, Corrigan said. “Everybody feels like that’s kind of their charge as a lacrosse player is to spread the word and share the game,” he said. “That’s a little bit part of the culture of the sport and it’s a good thing.”last_img read more

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Boldly expressing gratitude for essential workers – with a twist

first_img 44SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,Karen McGaughey Karen McGaughey is passionate about helping business leaders align their cultures and brands and cultivate highly engaged employees. She is responsible for guiding overall strategy and large-scale change efforts for … Web: https://www.strumagency.com Details News not to miss: One credit union CEO’s sudden realization of missing a moment to share gratitude with all employees, members and community partners led to a partnership to give a simple, inspiring campaign away free to every credit union in the U.S. and Canada. Read on.Shell shock is subsiding for thousands of credit union leaders as they make their way through their first phase of COVID-19 emergency response planning and execution. As the fog of crisis begins to clear, credit unions note their employees’ tremendous dedication and acts of kindness in helping struggling members and small business owners. It’s truly a defining moment for credit unions everywhere as their staff delivers essential help across their communities.This new way of working is challenging for many credit union employees. Remote teams are less engaged and feeling connected is tough. Days of isolation can be stressful and people aren’t always appreciated as worried members vent frustrations and share their disappointment about economic losses and health, to a general fear of the future, and even simple day-to-day inconveniences.In the midst of this unfolding crisis, stories of caring, responsive service and kindness are coming in from staff, generous members, and local community heroes stepping in—not just those on the front lines of the healthcare crisis. Essential help shows up in many places that are inspiring and encouraging in small ways.This got one credit union CEO, Brice Yocum, at Tucoemas Federal Credit Union in Visalia, California thinking about the essential work being done by his team and so many others in their community. “I had to remind myself amidst the constant flow of actions we’ve taken, that our employees are among those resilient essential workers. They’re adapting, showing up every day and fighting to help our members in distress,” explains Yocum. “I am filled with tremendous gratitude watching them help members and each other. These acts of selflessness and can-do attitude encouraged me to recognize this tailwind of optimism and hope in our communities.”Yocum decided he had to immediately do something to recognize people fighting to make a difference. “I called Karen McGaughey, the leader at Strum Agency who is managing our current strategic branding program to see what creative ideas their team might come up with to tackle this moment in time and help us honor deserving people all around us.”This led to the development of a gratitude campaign our team called, “&Essential”. The goals were simple: no products, no selling, just pure gratitude. Yocum adds, “The word essential means ‘absolutely necessary; extremely important.’ At Tucoemas that meant to show up, get things done, make sure the front-liners can take care of our members and our community in this crisis, as we rise up together.”Josh Streufert, Creative Director/Principal for Strum stresses, the &Essential campaign message and tone is built around the truth that essential workers, “are more than just their job. They are mothers and fathers, friends and colleagues, community volunteers, caregivers and much more.”From the local restaurateur serving meals to healthcare workers, the church providing childcare for law enforcement, to credit union staff teaching senior members how to use the ATM and online banking, our communities are filled with essential workers deserving of our thanks. Yocum adds, “It means being the person behind another person and providing a critical backbone of support. As our design emphasized, it’s not just about us, but about the whole essential community, all across our state and our country.”“What could happen if we gave it away to others?”We called Brice after he launched the campaign and asked if he’d be willing to partner with us and share out the &Essential gratitude campaign with every credit union for free so others could take the idea and make it their own. We’re always better together.CEO Brice was totally game. “It’s a great opportunity to share why credit unions are cooperatives who believe that people can truly make a difference together. We’re trying to unite people around us by showing how much we care about those making a difference,” he says.Tucoemas FCU and Strum decided the idea was worth sharing with everyone to pay it forward.To use the campaign, you can download the free artwork from Strum here. There’s a range of artwork for social media templates, t-shirt gift artwork, stickers and more. Use it any way it benefits your communities, members and your staff.last_img read more

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Golf News Birdies in the air: Golf back in Pakistan after 11-year hitch

first_imgAmrapali group tells Supreme Court nine properties sealed Karachi: Birds were released over fairways and ceremonial drives were struck as international golf returned to Pakistan Thursday after an 11-year absence.A full field of 132 players from around the globe were teeing up in the Asian Tour’s UMA CNS Open Championship at Karachi Golf Club, the latest thawing of relations with the militancy-hit country that has spent years in the sporting wilderness.”Coming back to Pakistan is a fantastic opportunity for us,” Robert Andrew, event director of the Asian Tour told AFP, brushing off any security concerns.Read More | Amrapali group tells Supreme Court nine properties sealed”This is the starting point for future years after the success of this event.” No major golf tour has visited Pakistan since 2007. The last scheduled tournament, in 2008, was cancelled after a wave of insurgent attacks.“It is always good to be here as people are very lovely and friendly,” said Australian golfer Marcus Both. “I came here 10 years ago. The perception is bad but in reality it is very different.” The 2009 attack on Sri Lanka’s bus in Lahore, in which eight people were killed, caused all sporting visits to be suspended.But successful military operations in the country’s northwest near the Afghan border and crackdowns in urban centres, including the restive port city of Karachi, have improved the situation.The country has twice hosted the Pakistan Super League cricket finals featuring international stars plus successful limited-over series against Zimbabwe, a World XI and Sri Lanka in the past 18 months.They cleared the way for more sports with squash, tennis and now golf having returned.Walls come down Former Asian Tour winner and Indian national Digvijay Singh said arriving in Pakistan felt like home, suggesting sport could pave the road for better relations between Islamabad and Delhi.“I am really feeling home here and we are so overwhelmingly welcomed here. We are seeing the same faces not different to us,” Singh told reporters.“Sports should bring the invisible walls down between the two countries,” he added.India-Pakistan ties, including sports and cultural contacts, plummeted after deadly 2008 attacks in Mumbai, which New Delhi blamed on Pakistani militants.While cricket remains the undisputed number one sport in Pakistan, golf is popular with the country’s powerful army, with military areas where the top brass reside frequently home to some of Pakistan’s best courses.Also Read | LIVE | Cyclone ‘Titli’ hits Odisha, Andhra Pradesh coasts; flights cancelled, shops damagedPakistan’s Navy are hosting this week’s Asian Tour event, which has a $300,000 prize fund.“There is a very overwhelming response by foreign players and that surprised us,” said Naval Commodore Mushtaq Ahmed.Pakistan hosted its first Asian Tour event in 1989, which was won by Filipino Frankie Minoza.The country’s only Asian Tour winner remains Taimur Hussain who triumphed at an event in Myanmar in 1998. For all the Latest Sports News News, Golf News News, Download News Nation Android and iOS Mobile Apps.last_img read more

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