Narcotics Agents Ran An Undercover Drug Sting At Widespread Panic’s Tour Closer

first_imgWhile Widespread Panic was wrapping up their winter tour with a killer performance at the Civic Center in Savannah, GA (Watch highlights here), it seems local police were working on a performance of their own. The Chatham-Savannah Counter Narcotics Team, as well as the Georgia Bureau of Investigation and the Drug Enforcement Administration, ran an undercover operation at the concert, ultimately arresting eight fans on felony drug charges.The agents actually attended the concert, where they were able to purchase controlled substances like LSD and heroin, as well as a cannister of nitrous oxide. The report in Savannah Now indicates that US currency and a vehicle were also seized in the operation. The report also features this damning parking lot photo:Naturally, the connection between drugs, law enforcement, and Widespread Panic conjures the memory of Troy Goode, who lost his life after being restrained by authorities outside of a WSP show last summer. More on that story can be read here. When law enforcement and live music cross paths, the result is never pretty. That’s why organizations like the Drug Policy Alliance exist, to get people help without damning them for their actions.If you’re heading to a concert, be safe!last_img read more

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Professors analyze federal shut down

first_imgThe U.S. government began to shut down for the first time in 17 years early Tuesday morning after a divide in Congress over the Affordable Care Act (ACA) kept the institution from compromising on a budget, therefore, leading to an absence of appropriations, David Campbell, professor of political science at the University of Notre Dame, said. Campbell said the fundamental issue resulting in a shutdown is that members of the Republican Party have taken a stand against the Affordable Care Act and have decided to use what would normally be a routine extension of government financing as a way to try to leverage their power of the purse in order to either stop or delay implementation of the ACA. “Back in the Clinton administration there was a showdown and the government was shut down,” Campbell said. “The consequence of that was the Republicans suffered quite badly because they were blamed by the public for the shutdown. I expect the same will happen this time.” Patrick Pierce, professor of political science at Saint Mary’s, credits the shutdown to a growing divide within the Republican Party itself, specifically amongst members in the House.  “I think the key issue is an intraparty issue within the Republican Party,” Pierce said. “Even further, it is an intraparty issue in the House. The Tea Party Republicans who really want to go to the wall on the Affordable Care Act and do everything they possibly can to eliminate it, are opposed, but not actively opposed by the rest of the party in the institution. “There is not an out-and-out war going on there, but folks that are more in the mainstream of the Republican Party in the house are certainly very conservative, but they don’t want to go as far as the Tea Party will go.” The Tea Party is not a formal organization in that some Republicans are officially card-carrying members and others are not, Campbell said. However, he said over the past few election cycles there has been an increasing number of Republicans elected who are father to the right than the members of Congress they have replaced.  To add to this, Pierce said the big question now is how the Republican Party will deal with this rising division within its entity. “This has been an ongoing issue just manifested in different ways within the Party for a while now,” Pierce said. “This division within the party got manifested in the 2008 campaign where McCain had to deal with the more extreme right of his party. It then got manifested again in 2012 when Romney has to deal with the extreme right of his party. “This has got to get resolved or the Republican Party is going to face some real difficulties.” The shutdown resulted in 800,000 federal employees being furloughed and national parks, monuments and museums, as well as most federal offices, being closed down, while essential federal services stayed up and running, Pierce said.  Uniformed members of the military are included in the list of essential federal government personnel, Pierce said. “Nobody wants to be seen as harming the military, nobody,” Pierce said. “There is nothing more patriotic than the American military, so you had to figure if there was one group that the Democrats and Republicans could get together on and make sure didn’t get hurt it is going to be the American military.” Non-essential government personnel were asked to not come to work on Tuesday, affecting workers across the nation, Campbell said. “It is easy to rail against the federal government without maybe stopping to think about what that really means,” Campbell said. “Even if it is not all government employees affected it is a big chunk of government employees.  “We think of government employees as only working in Washington, but think about the park rangers up at the Indiana Dunes National Park. Those park rangers aren’t getting paid … This is not just going to affect Washington, this is going to have an effect across the nation.” Pete Buttigieg, mayor of South Bend, said he is encouraging Congress to act so his constituents will not continue to be negatively affected by a lack of federal funds.  “I am concerned about the impact the shutdown will have on the local economy, and urge the House to put an end to this before it hurts South Bend even more,” Buttigieg said.  Pierce said the furloughs are probably the most acute impact the shutdown with have on students at Saint Mary’s and Notre Dame.  “My bet is there are a number of students whose parents work for the U.S. government and may end up furloughed and that is a considerable hardship,” Pierce said. “I know of a student at Saint Mary’s whose mother works for the federal government and she was very concerned about the shutdown … There are folks without paychecks and that harms their personal finances.”  With less available to circulate, Pierce said the shutdown will have a negative effect on the nation’s economy.  “If you think about it more broadly that means it [the shutdown] hurts the entire economy because now you have less money circulating in the economy,” Pierce said. “That means less money being used to purchase cars, homes, food, and vacations. Those purchases are what drive the economy.  “That is why President Obama keeps harping on the poor timing of this. It is not as though the economy is rocketing forward just yet, this will slow the economy down, not totally, but it will slow.” Pierce said in order for President Obama to have an effective presidency, he must stay firm on his decision to not “give in” to the Republicans. “I think maybe most folks don’t get is that Obama is noticeably more conservative than most of the members of his party in the House and the Senate and they have kind of gone along with him for the most part, but they have been terribly disappointed in the fact that he did cave in on a number of earlier issues,” Pierce said. Junior Mark Gianfall, president of College Republicans, said he blames partisan politics on the fact the government is currently living “paycheck to paycheck”, but also believes House Republicans were ready to compromise. “I think in this situation you have Republicans willing to compromise,” Gianfall said. “The bill they passed was to delay Obamacare for a year, not get rid of it completely. The Democrats in the Senate just have too big of an ego to even consider anything like that which is really not something against Obamacare because we are not trying to get rid of it at this point we were trying last night [Monday night] to delay it for one year, so the government could keep working in existence, I guess keep working at its full capacity.” Junior Sean Long, president of College Democrats, said the 800,000 furloughed employees are often lost in this blame game and they are the ones seeing the direct effects of the bickering currently going on in Washington. “For me, this whole thing, although I am coming from the democratic perspective, is a mess for us all, Democrats or Republicans,” Long said. “I would call myself a college student before I would call myself a Democrat and this is just horrible to have our lawmakers hold things like annual flu shot vaccinations, the Women, Infants and Children Food and Nutrition (WIC) program … all of these things are going to be cut. This is so much larger than what a lot of people are making it out to be … It makes me angry.”last_img read more

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Matthew Morrison Discusses Stamina Required for Finding Neverland

first_img Related Shows Show Closed This production ended its run on Aug. 21, 2016 Matthew Morrison stopped by Live with Kelly & Michael on April 14 to discuss just what it takes to lead Finding Neverland eight times a week on Broadway. The secret? Finding a way to get your heart rate down instantly while on stage—and in between show-stopping numbers. Morrison explains that while it’s a story from the early 1900s, the show “feels so contemporary and so current” with a modern pop score. Later on, Kelly ever-so-subtly applies to be Morrison’s new dresser/towel drier. Can you blame her? Take a look at the clip below, and catch Morrison and company in Finding Neverland at the Lunt-Fontanne Theatre. View Comments Finding Neverlandlast_img read more

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Steve Guttenberg Tapped for Outdoor Henry IV, Part 1

first_imgScreen favorite and Broadway alum Steve Guttenberg is heading to the park this summer for a small dose of Shakespeare. According to Time Out New York, he’ll appear in the Hudson Warehouse production of Henry IV, Part 1 as Henry Percy, Earl of Northumberland. Performances will run on Thursdays through Sundays from June 4 through June 28 at the Upper West Side’s Riverside Park. Nicholas Martin-Smith will direct.Guttenberg’s film career includes memorable performances in the Police Academy series, 3 Men and a Baby, Diner, Short Circuit and Cocoon. He has also appeared on Broadway in Relatively Speaking and Prelude to a Kiss and in the West End in The Boys Next Door.Further casting for the Hudson Warehouse production will be announced later. Of course, Riverside Park won’t be the only place you’ll be able to catch a screen favorite reciting the bard. The Public’s Shakespeare in the Park lineup this year includes Sam Waterston and Jesse Tyler Ferguson in The Tempest and Hamish Linklater and Lily Rabe in Cymbeline. View Commentslast_img read more

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Helping Farmers Cope.

first_imgWhen the farm crisis of the ’80s forced Ralph Dixon to stopfarming, he lost much more than his land and his home. He losthis identity.”I was a fourth generation farmer and every generationhad been successful, except me,” remembers Dixon. “WhenI lost my farm, I lost not only my way of making a living, I lostmy history and my culture. I may not be farming now, but I’m stilla farmer.”Farmers Facing Tough DecisionsBecause of Georgia’s current farm crisis, many farmers arefacing the same tough decisions Dixon faced more than a decadeago.”We’ve come to a point where we have to face reality.There’s not a lot we can do about the weather and the commodityprices, but we can help farmers deal with the situation,”said Bill Lambert, associate dean for extension at the Universityof Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences(UGA CAES).Preparing to HelpLambert was one of a host of speakers at a workshop called”Helping Georgia Farmers at Risk” Nov. 30 in Perry.The workshop was designed to train the state’s county ExtensionService agents and community teams to help Georgia farmers handlethe effects of the farm crisis.County agents attended the workshop with clergymen and farmlenders from their counties. These teams are preparing to serveas valuable resources for farmers facing the crisis in their counties.”Georgia farmers are coming off of two years of bad weatherconditions and low commodity prices,” said Lambert. “Weare looking at what we can do to help farmers deal with theiremotional and financial problems.”Gale Buchanan, dean and director of the UGA CAES, said thecurrent farm crisis will affect farmers and rural communitiesfirst, but will eventually affect everyone in the state. “There’sa ripple affect when farming suffers,” said Buchanan. “Everyonein Georgia will be affected.”Farm Bill, Drought, Prices to BlameBuchanan said the farm crisis is also the result of the 1996Freedom to Farm Bill. “The bill was designed to remove governmentcontrol from farming and since then, 262 Georgia farmers havequit farming,” said Buchanan. “Federal appropriationsare helping the remaining farmers hold on. But, in my opinion,they are not the cure.”He said Georgia’s farmers need agricultural research to helpthem succeed. “We at the university are always searchingfor new alternative crops that can help Georgia farmers,”said Buchanan. “The new carrot industry is just one example.”The “Helping Georgia Farmers at Risk” workshop includedfinancial training on family budgeting, evaluating financial status,debt management and federal farm aid. The county teams also receivedcounseling training on stress management and depression.Farmers Need Support from Family and FriendsAs aformer farmer, Dixon said he feels the most important thing farmersneed during times of crisis is support from their friends andfamily. “When you are sick, people come to visit,” hesaid. “But if you are going under financially, people stayaway. They don’t know what to say. I say, don’t stay away.”Dixon said he never imagined he would fail at farming. “Iwas part of the world’s oldest profession – agriculture,”said Dixon. “After all, Adam and Eve were farmers.”The former farmer remembers feeling displaced and depressedafter losing his farm.”We came out of our life’s work with $3,000 and an oldChevrolet with a bad transmission,” he said. “I cantell you that seeing your name on a foreclosure notice in thenewspaper is a very humbling experience.”Today, Dixon is a Methodist minister and his wife is a bankteller. “We paid everyone we owed and avoided bankruptcy,but we owed good people,” said Dixon. “We still livein our hometown and I’m not ashamed to walk the streets of Sylvania,Georgia.”Dixon says his only regret is that he never sought impartialfinancial advice. “There are a lot of situations like minehappening all across Georgia today,” he said. “I praythat everyone survives this crisis, but some may not.”last_img read more

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CUNA: Mulvaney is properly appointed to lead CFPB

first_img continue reading » 38SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr Mick Mulvaney is the properly appointed interim director of the CFPB, CUNA argued in a brief filed Tuesday in a suit challenging the director’s appointment.“CUNA and its members have a strong interest in ensuring that the CFPB at all times operates under proper direction of the official who is statutorily and constitutionally entitled to act as its Director,” the trade group said in its brief.When CFPB Director Richard Cordray resigned, he designated Leandra English, his chief-of-staff, as deputy director. Agency supporters argued that under Dodd-Frank, she would be interim director until a permanent replacement was named and confirmed by the Senate.However, President Trump asserted he has the power to appoint an interim director and designated Mulvaney, director of the Office of Management and Budget.last_img read more

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One killed in car crash in Chemung County

first_imgTOWN OF SOUTHPORT (WBNG) — The Chemung County Sheriff’s Office says one person was killed in a one-car crash Tuesday afternoon. He was transported to the Arnot Ogden Medical Center where he was pronounced dead, they say. The sheriff’s office says 69-year-old John J. Pendleton was killed when his vehicle left the roadway and struck a tree on Pennsylvania Avenue in the town of Southport. The sheriff’s office says it believes Pendleton had a “medical episode” which caused him to leave the roadway. New York State Police, Pine City and Southport Volunteer Fire departments and Erway Ambulance responded to the incident.last_img read more

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164 people recover from COVID-19 in Broome County

first_imgOnly counties that do not foresee a surge in COVID-19 cases are allowed to have hospitals performing the surgeries. For a map detailing where cases are located in Broome County, click here. Wednesday morning, Governor Andrew Cuomo announced select counties, including Broome, will allow elective surgeries. (WBNG) — Broome County Executive Jason Garnar announced there are 97 active cases of the coronavirus in the County. In total, 282 cases have been reported. Additionally, Garnar also said Lourdes and UHS hospitals will be able to perform elective surgeries. Healthcare workers or essential employees that wish to be tested for COVID-19 may get a test Friday, but they need to make an appointment first.center_img 164 people have recovered from the virus and 21 people have died. Coronavirus numbers Garnar also reminded county residents that a COVID-19 drive-thru testing site has been established at Binghamton University. Drive-thru testing and elective surgeries Broome County April 29 coronavirus updatelast_img read more

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Borr Drilling sheds 14 jack-up rigs

first_imgBorr’s fleet  Offshore driller Borr Drilling has sold 14 old jack-up rigs en bloc to a non-drilling company as part of its rationalization program following Paragon Offshore takeover.The rigs will be delivered to the new unnamed owner over the next 30 days and the disposal is expected to contribute up to $16 million in profit to Borr’s 2Q 2018 results, the driller said on Monday while announcing the sale.The company further said that 13 of the rigs will be demobilized as drilling rigs and will be targeted for mobile offshore production unit (MOPU) orientated work. The remaining unit is allocated to development work for a specific life of field project. None of the rigs will re-enter the international jack-up drilling market post this transaction.Borr Drilling noted it has, since the conclusion of the Paragon transaction earlier this year, actively tried to reduce the daily operating cost and capex linked to rigs which from a technical, economical or safety perspective are not feasible to return to revenue generating drilling activities.Since the beginning of the year, Borr and Paragon have sold in total 26 rigs which will all leave the actively marketed jack-up fleet. According to Borr, the direct stacking cost for these 26 rigs was estimated to be around $35 million yearly which will be reduced to zero when the last rig is delivered within the next 30 days.Out of the total delivered jack up fleet of 531 units, in total 244 units (46 %) were delivered prior to 1988. In total, 104 of these older units have been stacked for more than a year. The cost and investments required to bring old, unemployed rigs back to the drilling market cannot be defended from a financial, operational or safety point of view, Borr explained. Borr Drilling said it has executed its divestment strategy and will, after the rationalization of the fleet and delivery of the remaining nine newbuilds, have 24 high spec jack-ups, making it the largest premium jack-up operator in the world.In addition, Borr Drilling owns five older jack-ups and one older North Sea semi-submersible all performing contractual obligations, and two older jack-ups unemployed in the North Sea Market.CEO, Svend Anton Maier, said: “We have, over the last 17 months, been able to build a unique fleet of 24 high specification assets acquired at attractive prices funded by a strong combination of equity and attractive seller financing.”He concluded: “We see clear signs that the tender activity in the market is increasing, to a large extent, driven by NOCs and major oil companies. With the solid operational platform built both organically and through the Paragon acquisition, we are very well positioned for what we see as the start of the next upturn cycle in the jack-up market.”last_img read more

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Ronaldo breaks Serie A record

first_img Ronaldo has been criticised recently after missing a penalty against Milan in the Coppa Italia semi-final and struggling to have an impact in the final versus Napoli. Former Italy international Luca Toni described Ronaldo’s performance in the last four of the Coppa Italia as ‘average’. “I saw the whole Juventus team in difficulty, even Cristiano Ronaldo, who looked like an average player in what was a very slow match,” Toni told Rai Sport after the Milan clash. “You expect a big performance from him but he looked like he was experiencing physical difficulties – he couldn’t even dribble past a man. read also:Ronaldo offers escape route for Man Utd flop as Solskjaer dilemma nears Ronaldo’s sister took to Instagram after the match to stick up for her brother, stating that he can’t always be expected to win matches on his own. She said: “What else can you do? It is what it is and my darling can’t work miracles alone. I can’t understand how they played like that. Anyway, keep your head up. You can’t do more, my king.” The Coppa Italia final loss marks the only time in Ronaldo’s career that he has lost two successive finals, having been defeated by Lazio in the Supercoppa Italiana at the tail end of 2019. FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail分享 Ronaldo slotted the first-half penalty down the middle in Juve’s 2-0 win over Bologna, a result that saw the Bianconeri move four points clear at the top of the table. The goal was Ronaldo’s 22nd in Serie A this season, one more than the 21 he managed in his debut campaign in Turin following his move from Real Madrid in 2018. In reaching 43 goals, the 35-year-old also moved beyond Rui Costa as the Portuguese player with the most goals in Italy’s top flight. Rui Costa spent eight years in Serie A, playing for Fiorentina and then Milan between 1994 and 2006. Former Manchester United star Ronaldo remains the top Portuguese scorer in Premier League history having scored 84 times in 196 appearances. He is the also the leading Portuguese scorer in La Liga history having registered 311 goals in 292 appearances for Real Madrid, where he is the all-time leading scorer. Only Ronaldo’s great personal rival Barcelona captain Lionel Messi has scored more La Liga goals. Juventus forward, Cristiano Ronaldo, overtook Rui Costa to become the leading Portuguese scorer in Serie A history on Monday.center_img Loading…last_img read more

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