Stalking the ‘big idea’

first_imgMore than 1,000 students packed into Sanders Theatre a few weeks ago for an event that was — as we called it in our original pitch materials — “something new and different.” The concept was simple enough to fit on a bumper sticker: “10 professors speak for 10 minutes each about their one big idea.” It was appropriately titled “Harvard Thinks Big,” and its production and success were the culmination of a year and a half of work by a team of Harvard undergraduates that included me.Though much of the excitement surrounding “Harvard Thinks Big” in February can be explained by its scope — by the posters that emphasized “This is Harvard,” by marketing the session as a “buffet of Harvard thinking,” by the all-star professors on the bill — the cause of the excitement was something deeper, an element of truth that universities need to pay more attention to if they care about their research hitting home with students and the population at large, if they care about academia’s ability to generate passion and change the world for the better. The real reason behind the event’s success, and why so many students who had just had of long day of classes submitted themselves to two more hours of lecture, was a simple fact: Ideas excite people.If you were in the crowd that night, or if you have viewed the videos online at www.HUTVnetwork.com/HarvardThinksBig, you didn’t just hear facts, figures, and data, or even just analyses, templates, and constructs. You heard ideas. Upon reading it put that way, you might have the same worries that others did when we first proposed the concept: that the night would be a “razzle-dazzlefication” of truth, that we were asking professors to (and I quote an original detractor) “dumb down their research into bite-sized chunks devoid of truth for the sake of shallow entertainment, feeding our already-too-short attention spans.”True, we limited the talks to 10 minutes and asked professors to speak so that everyone in the audience could understand. (The literature professor never said “bildungsroman,” and the computer science professor never uttered the phrase “hardware-embedded hypervisor.”) We did that partly because we wanted the night to bring together various disciplines, to be relevant to all students watching, and, yes, to be fun and entertaining.The real innovation of “Harvard Thinks Big” (and the West Coast “TEDTalks” that inspired it), though, is not that it made knowledge bite-size. It was that it made professors take their years of work and boil it down to its core, to find the driving force behind their passion for exploration, to find and share the answer to the lingering question: “Professor, what’s the takeaway? What’s the big idea?”And what they shared was not “truth for dummies” or “truth, glamorized” or “truth, action-packed.” What they shared was an idea, a tremendously important form of veritas that has been lost to many in academia. Ideas are infused with passion. Ideas are often subjective and often have (gasp!) a spiritual element. Ideas are organized and poetic. Ideas are relevant. They take data and make it matter to people. All ideas, as English Professor Matthew Kaiser said that night, “start as emotion.”Big ideas matter: Cooking is what made us human. Social networks have value. Appreciating religious pluralism is tremendously important to our coming century. Protest is the driving force behind American social change. Coding makes you see the real world differently. We should revolt from the king. An invisible hand drives the market. Workers of the world unite. DNA holds our genetic code. All men are created equal.Ideas are indeed bite-sized, but — when released — fire the imagination.True, some ideas have wreaked havoc, especially in the past century. But, more often than not, the excitement they spur has been used as a force for good. And in an age of rising youth apathy, the power of ideas (in their debating, debunking, and implementing) to draw out passion, drive, and excitement in people cannot be ignored.The ideas of Harvard’s students and professors can be tapped more effectively. We need more opportunities to reflect on “the takeaway,” the thing to hold onto, the thing to fight for or against, the thing to experiment with, to debate, to get excited about. We need more forums to share ideas (and we hope “Harvard Thinks Big” was the first of many such sessions). Ideas need to have a larger university presence. That’s our takeaway, our own big idea: Ideas matter.If you’re an undergraduate or graduate student and have an essay to share about life at Harvard, please e-mail your ideas to Jim Concannon, the Gazette’s news editor, at [email protected]last_img read more

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Director of health services to step down

first_img Related Expanded Counseling and Mental Health Services After 15 years of service dedicated to improving health and wellness at Harvard, Paul Barreira will step down as director of Harvard University Health Services (HUHS), effective Nov. 18.During his tenure, Barreira made significant strides in the advancement of HUHS’ mission to provide compassionate, high-quality care, and to support the health and well-being of Harvard’s diverse patient populations. Barreira addressed critical public-health concerns, remained committed to continual improvement in the health of Harvard’s students, and consistently applied forward-thinking approaches to deliver high-quality, compassionate care, leaving an indelible mark on the University.“Paul Barreira has brought his deep and wide understanding of university health to Harvard,” said Faculty Dean Judy Palfrey, the T. Berry Brazelton Professor of Pediatrics at Harvard Medical School and the director of the Global Pediatrics Program for the Department of Medicine at the Children’s Hospital in Boston.“The physical and mental health concerns of our students are central to their success in School and in life,” Palfrey said. “Paul has used the most up-to-date methods for administering a ‘medical home’ for students, monitoring their health and well-being with sophisticated survey methodology and introducing creative clinical innovations. He has been a marvelous colleague and his work will have a lasting effect here at Harvard and on the lives of the students he has cared for with such skill and true commitment.”Under Barreira’s leadership, HUHS worked to address pressing public-health issues and their effects on the campus community. During his tenure, HUHS responded to the mumps outbreak of 2016, and developed a protocol to evaluate community members who returned to Harvard from Ebola-affected countries in 2014. Both of these initiatives are nationally recognized successes, with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reviewing Harvard’s data and trends from the mumps outbreak to determine best ways to combat future outbreaks.He also led the establishment of the Department of Health Promotion and Education, which offers a holistic approach to student health and wellness and includes the Office of Alcohol & Other Drug Services (AODS), the Center for Wellness, and the Office of Sexual Assault Prevention & Response (OSAPR), along with key contributors from HUHS in the areas of nursing, medicine, counseling and mental health, and nutrition.Perhaps most notably, Barreira established several new student peer-education groups including: Harvard Drug and Alcohol Peer Advisors, a group of student advisers who serve both as health opinion leaders and resources for their peers; student mental health liaisons (SMHL); and HealthPALS, a team of student health care liaisons between HUHS and the campus community. He also created a student-run EMS service, CrimsonEMS, and initiated and designed surveys on health and mental health for College and graduate students to better understand the community landscape, and then build new initiatives to improve upon it.“Dr. Barreira is a role model for the type of doctor, leader, and person I hope to be,” said Seth Cassel, M.D. ’13, M.D.-Ph.D. ’20. “My time working with him in the SMHL group was one of the absolute highlights of my College experience — his dedication to helping others and infectious energy are without equal.“I always knew that whatever ideas we put forward to promote positive conversations surrounding mental health, he would be there to help us make them happen,” Cassel continued. “I was always impressed by how he balanced such a significant leadership role within the University while also staying in close touch with the student body. He knew every member of our group personally, was a mentor to essentially every SMHL, and even welcomed us to his home on the Cape for very memorable annual retreats.”Barreira also recognized the importance of serving a particular population of Harvard community members — student athletes — streamlining the University’s services to add athletic trainers to HUHS staff and assigning mental health counselors specifically for athletics.According to Harvard athletic director Bob Scalise, establishing “continuity of care” with HUHS was a “big deal” and made a significant impact in the care student athletes receive, in terms of physical and mental health and in nutrition designed to help them better perform on and off the field.“Paul is thoughtful, open-minded, a terrific problem-solver, and he has a can-do attitude,” Scalise added.Barreira also improved options for mental health care on campus, both in traditional clinical options and through a budding community-health model designed to meet students where they are. He created the Department Behavioral Health and Academic Counseling (BHAC) that previously oversaw the Bureau of Study Counsel, Counseling and Mental Health Services (CAMHS), AODS, OSAPR, and the Center for Wellness. Recently, CAMHS significantly increased its resources by adding an expanded and modernized space on the fourth floor of the Smith Campus Center, increasing its staff 25 percent since spring, and launching several initiatives to serve students better no matter where they are on campus, and ensure that programming responds to and reflects the diversity in the community. Barreira also established the Department of Behavioral Health to meet the needs of faculty and staff who seek care at HUHS.Barreira worked with his leadership team to provide empathy training to the HUHS organization. He also led an effort to adopt a new style of team-based work, resulting in daily huddles in which teams identify and solve problems inside their own departments. One highlight of this has been the development of a Safety Reporting System team to ensure not only that those who experience safety events are formally responded to within seven days, but also that new protocols are created to prevent such events from happening again.Barreira has a long-standing affiliation with Harvard and its teaching hospitals. He is the founder and former program director of Waverley Place at McLean Hospital, and has been a lecturer and preceptor to psychiatry residents there since 2000. He is currently a member of eight committees and advisory boards at the University.A graduate of Boston College, magna cum laude, and Georgetown University Medical School, Barreira was recognized in 2010 as a Distinguished Fellow by the American Psychiatric Association. He has served as a member of the Massachusetts Association for Mental Health, the Massachusetts Psychiatric Society, and the National Association of Student Mental Health Program Directors. Prior to his work at HUHS, Barreira was director of community and public psychiatry for Partners HealthCare System in Boston. He has also served as deputy commissioner and medical director of the Massachusetts Department of Mental Health.Barreira will remain at the University as the director of the Graduate Student Mental Health Initiative, where he will work with the Provost’s Office of Institutional Research. In this role, Barreira will continue to help the University improve its understanding and support of graduate and professional student health.center_img Barreira, Lewis discuss new space, and how it helps broaden their missionlast_img read more

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ND Physics professor participates in Hubble project

first_imgPhysics Professor Peter Garnavich is part of the largest Hubble telescope project undertaken to date, allowing him to examine distant galaxies and far-away supernovae.The telescope allows astronomers to gather data about galaxy evolution and cosmology as it can discern light that has traveled for billions of years across the universe.“This is a huge project by NASA to get the maximum information possible since the Hubble was repaired last May,” Garnavich said.He said the telescope  repairs improved the infrared camera on the Hubble telescope, giving it a larger viewing field as well as better camera quality. This allows the camera to see much further than it previously could.The project will look at more than 250,000 distant galaxies.Garnavich said the project will maximize time on the telescope by looking at the sky above the ecliptic poles, ensuring neither the sun nor the earth interferes or blocks the sky during the allotted time.The application for time on the Hubble telescope is very competitive, Garnavich said.“Only one in every 10 proposals are accepted,” he said.The more orbits a proposal requires, the less likely it is to be accepted, he said. Any project requiring more than 100 orbits is much less likely to be accepted.Even though the group requested 902 orbits, its proposal was approved because the project is a part of the Multi Cycle Treasury program, spreading the project over multiple years.The length of the project is also significant because it will look at pictures from the same spot in the earth’s orbit from year to year and compare differences.The team will look for several significant changes, including supernovae and the accretion of mass into the black holes at the center of galaxies.“With this project, we will be looking at the most distant supernovae and galaxies ever seen,” Garnavich said.last_img read more

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Muslim Student Association holds annual Islam Awareness Week

first_imgPhoto Courtesy of Muhammad Abubakar Mian Members of the Muslim Student Association pass out hijabs during 2016’s Islam Awareness Week outside DeBartolo Hall as a way of informing students on Muslim practices and creating interreligious dialogue.On Saturday, MSA hosted an Islamophobia Training session, a new addition to the annual Awareness Week. The event focused on bringing awareness to the issue of Islamophobia and promoting and understanding allyship.One of the biggest events of the week is a hijab distribution, which will take place Monday from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Fieldhouse Mall. This event focuses on educating people about the meaning, purpose and history of the hijab.“With the hijab distribution, people can just come by — and obviously there’ll be a couple of Muslims at the stand — and you can start and have a conversation,” he said. “You can ask them questions, get to know one another a little bit, you might even end up making a friend.”The week, which is cosponsored by student government, the Gender Relations Center, Campus Ministry, the Ansari Institute for Global Engagement with Religion and Diversity Council, will continue with previous years’ events including a dinner on Tuesday and a mosque visit on Friday. Thursday’s event will be a halaqa, which is a gathering to discuss religious matters, on the rights of parents.“These are all events that we do every year because they bring so much value,” Mian said.In addition to the traditional events that occur every year, the MSA will be introducing a new event. Wednesday will feature a dessert crawl and cultural night. Mian said the MSA decided to plan this event in an attempt to show — contrary to some common misconceptions — the Muslim world is very diverse.“The culture night is going to be Muslim students on campus from different Muslim countries that will be giving short, fun, five-minute presentations on their country, and that’ll be really exciting,” Mian said. “I think a lot of people will really be surprised by just how much diversity there is to the different Muslim cultures all over the world.”In light of the recent tragedy in New Zealand where 50 people were killed at Friday Prayer, Mian said he hopes Islam Awareness Week will provide a new perspective on recent events and the sacredness and meaning of Friday Prayer in the Islamic tradition.“All of these events provide an opportunity to really understand the weight of the tragedy,” he said. “I think visiting the Mosque might really show people, might shed greater light on the weight of this tragedy given what the Friday Prayer is.”Speaking on the overall goal of Islam Awareness Week, Mian said he hopes Muslims and non-Muslims on campus will grow in community.“As Muslims living in a non-Muslim community, it’s very important that we show people that are members of the non-Muslim community that we’re fully confident that we fully trust in them. Just like we would expect non-Muslims to fully trust and be fully confident in us,” Mian said. “That’s really what we’re trying to accomplish here: exposure to one another. That’s how you build trust in one another. That’s how a non-Muslim grows confidence in his Muslim neighbor, and that’s what we hope to accomplish with Islam Awareness Week.”Tags: Cultural Diversity, Islam, islam awareness week, Muslim Student Association, religion Notre Dame’s Muslim Student Association (MSA) kicked off their annual Islam Awareness Week for 2019 last Saturday. The week is designed to share aspects of the Islamic faith with students across campus, sophomore and MSA president Muhammad Abubakar Mian said.“The main purpose of Islam Awareness Week is really just exposure,” Mian said. “It’s providing an opportunity for the non-Muslim community here on campus to come together with the Muslim community, to start a dialogue or get interacting with one another.”last_img read more

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Dominican Republic: DNCD makes huge cocaine bust

first_imgBy Dialogo October 24, 2012 SANTO DOMINGO, Dominican Republic – Dominican police and counter-narcotics authorities said they broke up an international drug trafficking ring responsible for smuggling South American drugs through the Dominican Republic. The Dominican National Directorate for Drug Control (DNCD) said on Oct. 21 it found hundreds of packets of cocaine after stopping two vehicles traveling toward the capital of Santo Domingo on a highway in southwestern Dominican Republic. Agents discovered more packets in raids following the seizure of the vehicles. Authorities estimated the shipment weighed around 950 kilograms (2,094.4 pounds) and had a street value of millions of U.S. dollars. Police arrested eight suspects during the seizure, which culminated in a dramatic shootout in the early morning hours of Oct. 21. Following the arrests, authorities carried out at least 10 raids on houses and apartments in search of the suspected leaders of the ring, said District Attorney Yeni Berenice Reynoso’s office in a statement. The detained were identified as Julio César Herrera Marte, Marcelino Cuevas Féliz, Melvin Pérez, Jesús Javier, Ramón Villar, Joé Luis García Ortiz and sisters Dalisis and Eriné Turbí. Reynoso’s office said authorities were searching for brothers Sair Luis and Otto Luis Ducasse Herrera, César Peralta, Pedro Mota and a man they only identified as “La Araña” (The Spider). Authorities said the group smuggled the drugs from South America to the Dominican Republic’s Caribbean coast via speedboats. Around 5 a.m. on Oct. 21, police and DNCD agents set up a traffic stop for vehicles traveling between Santo Domingo and the southwestern Dominican Republic. Authorities stopped a white Toyota Tundra pickup truck and a black Honda Acura SUV. The DNCD said occupants of the vehicles opened fire at agents and a shootout followed, during which at least one suspect was injured. When the exchange of gunfire ended, police found 770 packets of cocaine in the vehicles. Police immediately carried out several raids on houses and apartments, including a house in the La Castellana neighborhood of Santo Domingo, where Herrera Marte lived. Agents found an additional 106 packets of cocaine in the home and more cocaine in other raids for a total of 928 packets. The cocaine was sent to the National Institute of Forensic Sciences’ laboratories for testing and weighing, authorities said. DNCD Chief Gen. Rolando Rosado Mateo said the same criminal ring received 777 kilograms (1,713 pounds) of cocaine via speedboats on the southern coast in August. The group allegedly then tried to send a cocaine shipment to Rotterdam, in the Netherlands, in a shipping container. In that case, authorities seized the shipment from the Multimodal Port Caucedo outside the beach town Boca Chica, east of the capital. Rosado said authorities gathered intelligence on the group since the raid. Agents followed suspected drug traffickers for several days, including at a party in an entertainment center known as Cigarro Café. It was then agents began to follow Sair Luis Ducasse Herrera, whom they identified as the “main brain” of an international operation that smuggled drugs out of South America, using the Dominican Republic as a bridge.last_img read more

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Do you wish your credit union could give more?

first_imgIs your credit union like 60 percent of its peers that told us (at our 2015 CUNA Mutual Group Discovery Conference executive benefits booth) that they wish they could give more to their favorite charities?Take a moment to think how much it would benefit your community, and your credit union, to increase donations to your chosen 501(c)(3) charity or foundation or the National Credit Union Foundation. Cause marketing strategies and charitable donation accounts are tools you can use to help.A CDA is a professionally managed investment portfolio, which follows rules set by the National Credit Union Administration in 2013, with the potential to earn more than traditional credit union investments, and allowing your credit union to retain up to 49 percent of the earnings for your bottom line.Your CDA investment can work much harder for your credit union (and community) if you follow some basic cause marketing strategies, such as these five:Believe wholeheartedly in the cause. Connect with a cause that your board, management and employees are passionate about, giving everyone a reason to be enthusiastic about participating in fundraising and other volunteer activities. continue reading » 5SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

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Excellent cooperation between TZGZ and TZZŽ on the destination campaign – Around Zagreb

first_imgLogically, smartly and I can say finally because this is a win-win for everyone. Both for the Zagreb Tourist Board and the Tourist Board, and mostly for tourists and visitors, both domestic and foreign. So far, the Zagreb Green Ring has by no means managed to position itself towards the Zagreb market, which is a logical link, and so Zagreb has not realized the potential of a quality offer in its surroundings, only 30 minutes from the center of Zagreb. Apart from a better quality of life for the citizens of Zagreb, in the domain of daily or weekend visitors, all tourists who come to Zagreb would also have an excellent, more diverse and high-quality offer. Tourism knows no borders, and with this, I sincerely hope for the first joint cooperation and complementarity, absolutely everyone benefits. “The friendship between Zagreb and Zagreb County is also expressed in these extraordinary circumstances, mutually confirming mutual trust and partnership, which resulted in the destination campaign “Close to the city, close to the heart”. In preparation, we followed the trends in the travel market, listening to the security situation, and now we are launching a joint campaign in three foreign languages: English, German, Slovenian and, of course, Croatian. At TZGZ, we have recognized the ideal partner and we are sure that our joint campaigns will be implemented in the future as Zagreb County embraces Zagreb.. “Said the director of TZZŽ, Mrs. Ivana Alilović. “Staying outdoors, in greenery and nature with a focus on health, safety, sustainability and compatibility of the offer of Zagreb and its surroundings, are the main features of the partnership campaign TZZŽ and TZGZ. Unlike our previous activities in which TZGZ purposefully promotes a certain tourist product (Zagreb Light Festival, health tourism, summer events in Zagreb, etc.), the campaign “Near the city, close to the heart” / “Around Zagreb” is special and important because a word about a specific destination promotion. The idea of ​​joint promotion, which we have been negotiating with colleagues from TZZŽ, we have successfully realized with the arrival of Ms. Alilović and I am glad that we are now partnering in target markets: Germany, Austria, Slovenia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, and, of course, in other parts of Croatia”Said the director of TZGZ, Ph.D. Martina Bienenfeld. The Tourist Board of the City of Zagreb and the Tourist Board of the Zagreb County together created a special promotional campaign dedicated to Zagreb and its surroundings under the slogan “Near the city, close to the heart” / “Around Zagreb”. This is the first time that these two tourist boards have cooperated in partnership, promoting the capital and the Zagreb Green Ring through a unique destination campaign. It was made for the needs of the campaign new destination website www.aroundzagreb.hr, which provides specific information about the offer, content and attractions, a list of restaurants, a calendar of events and suggestions on how to spend three days in Zagreb and the surrounding area. In the end, I hope that this is just the beginning of joint cooperation between TZGZ and TZZZ, because I emphasize again, this is a win win situation for everyone. The campaign TZGZ and TZZŽ “Near the city, close to the heart” was created with the aim of creating a unique platform to promote the rich offer of Zagreb and its surroundings. In that sense, as a destination campaign, it will address emitting markets throughout the year, reminding travel lovers how diverse, high-quality and attractive the tourist offer of Zagreb and the Zagreb surroundings is. I must certainly emphasize the proactivity of the Tourist Board, which in a new direction and energy began to proactively penetrate the market and in this extraordinary time for tourism, despite all the shortcomings and challenges, stood out the most of all tourist boards in Croatia. last_img read more

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At least 10 injured in violent dispute during second day of PAN congress

first_imgThe head of the Southeast Sulawesi Police’s General Crime Unit, Sr. Comr. La Ode Aries Elfatar, said four of the injured members were being treated at the Bhayangkara Hospital in Kendari. Several entrances to the meeting room were also damaged in the ruckus.The fight started when supporters of one of the candidates vying to be party chairman, Mulfachri Harahap, entered the meeting room to protest the congress committee’s decision to postpone the meeting.The organizing committee told congress participants to stay outside the meeting room during the recess, but supporters of incumbent chairman Zulkifli Hasan chose to remain inside, triggering the clash.Mulfachri said he predicted that a fight would break out because of what he described as poor management on the part of the organizers.“The registration system is very bad; many people who were not eligible to attend the meeting were given membership cards. Some people also entered the congress without membership cards,” he said as quoted by kompas.com.Meanwhile, Southeast Sulawesi Police chief Brig. Gen. Merdisyam said his team had already secured the meeting room following a request from the event’s organizers.“We will not be involved in deciding what started the fight, since it’s their internal matter,” Merdisyam said. (dpk)Topics : At least 10 National Mandate Party (PAN) members were injured in a violent dispute during the second day of the party’s national congress in the Claro Hotel in Kendari, Southeast Sulawesi, on Tuesday.In a video of the incident posted on Twitter, several congress participants are seen throwing chairs at each other after the congress leader adjourned the meeting.Begini suasana keributan pada Konggres partai PAN yg katanya Partai IslamPartai Allah tapi kenapa para kadernya tdk bermoral gini ya…Miriiiiiiiis !!!! pic.twitter.com/e3cPYFQjb8— Petruk (@Petruk07139808) February 11, 2020last_img read more

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Changing a few words doesn’t make gay marriage real

first_imgWaikato Times 22 April 2013 – Narelle HensonSame-sex marriage is not, by its very nature, the same as heterosexual marriage. It never will be. No matter how much we fiddle with the law, or censor the use of words like “bride” and “groom”, the fact that homosexual marriage does not tend toward the conception and raising of children will forever set it apart.That is why advocates of real marriage argued against the inclusion of same-sex couples, by law, into the definition of marriage. They understand that marriage plays an astonishingly important role in our society and that role is getting lost in all the mucking around with laws and words.They understand that the great purpose of the institution is to provide a framework in which a family may be created, and the next generation raised.They understand that marriage is not a “right”, just as friendship is not a “right”. Marriage is a responsibility. It is first a responsibility toward the happiness, security and trust of another, and second a responsibility to the happiness, security and trust of a child. In calling marriage a right, the advocates of same-sex marriage have turned it into an individualistic pursuit, because rights make us think about what we deserve. To call it a responsibility reminds us that true marriage is actually about what others deserve from us and, most of all, what our children deserve from us.http://www.stuff.co.nz/waikato-times/opinion/8580253/Changing-a-few-words-doesn-t-make-gay-marriage-reallast_img read more

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