Local resident to continue ‘just living’ in midst of Eddy Street Phase II construction

first_imgAlex Daugherty | The Observer Johnnie Johnson brushes off the stoop outside his house, which stands in the middle of the area Notre Dame announced plans to develop in the second phase of construction on the Eddy Street Commons. Johnson refused to sell his property to the University and Indianapolis-based Kite Realty.The property will remain untouched where it sits on the corner of Napoleon Street and North Eddy Street, but his residence will soon be cushioned by newly constructed townhomes and retail space. “This house stays,” Johnson said. “The plan is to build up to me unless something else happens.”Johnson said he knows better than anyone how desired his property is.“I’ve had cash offers from people in Colorado, Florida, Ohio,” he said. “Some are alumni. Some are just plain developers. Sometimes people just send me a postcard: ‘I’ve been trying to get a hold of you for a month and you don’t even call me back. How can we talk?’ And all this stuff, all mad at me.”Notre Dame has offered to buy his property on “several occasions,” Johnson said. He said he shifts back and forth between accepting the offers and refusing to lose his home — which he originally purchased as a tiny room in 1982 and managed to transform into a 2,500 square foot home.“Some days I do, and some days I don’t,” he said. “I think about Florida, and I think about somewhere warmer.”A certain price tag could persuade him to sell, Johnson said.“[It’s] in my head,” he said. “I won’t even tell anybody, but if somebody’s not close to where I want to be, I’ll just pass it on to my son and grandson.”Johnson said his property is the largest privately owned piece of land within a half-mile of Notre Dame Stadium, occupied by him and ten-year-old Tibetan Terrier, Sprocket.Johnson said he would not disclose the exact amount the University offered him.“The money is out there,” he said. “It’s a lot of money. It’s up there.” Notre Dame and Indianapolis-based Kite Realty recently broke ground on the second phase of Eddy Street in December 2017. This phase includes the construction of a grocery store, a revamped Robinson Learning Center, 22 single-family houses, 17 “flex” units, more than 400 new apartments and 8,500 square feet designated to restaurant space, according to Notre Dame News. Despite the ongoing transformation of Eddy Street, one original feature will remain: Johnnie Johnson’s house. Alex Daugherty | The Observer Johnson’s house, which sits on the corner of Napoleon Street and North Eddy Street, will soon be surrounded by construction related to Eddy Street Commons Phase II.Greg Hakanen, director of the Northeast Neighborhood Redevelopment, said in an email the University’s goal was to “find an arrangement that was acceptable to both parties, including making provision for Mr. Johnson to continue to live in the neighborhood if he wished to do so.” “We made several proposals to build him a new residence in the immediate area, but obviously did not reach agreement,” Hakanen said.Johnson has demonstrated commitment to serving the community of homes around him, Hakanen said.“Johnnie Johnson is an institution in the northeast neighborhood,” Hanaken said. “He takes meticulous care of both the house and the grounds. Over the years he extended himself to elderly neighbors, helping them with homeowner tasks that were difficult for them to address. In short, he is a wonderful neighbor, and we are glad to have him in the neighborhood.”Johnson said he has witnessed these neighbors gradually disappear in the last decade as Notre Dame bought up the properties in northeast neighborhood one by one to develop Eddy Street Commons. He said he watched as a new demographic moved into sparkling townhouses where familiar sights and people used to be. “The most obvious change is that people who bought property around here, some don’t even live here in some of those townhouses and just come for the games,” said Johnson, “They’re super, super expensive, so that literally changed the population — the income and the whole bit.” He said he observed a demographic shift.“Basically it’s the money people that moved in,” he said. “We went from literally Rottweilers to fluffy dogs like Sprocket.”Johnson joked that he would consider selling his house in exchange for Maui. He said, though, it’s impossible to put a price on the love and labor that went into his beloved home of 36 years. Johnson’s decision to stay amidst the expansion of Eddy Street is not about the money, he said. “Some girl came up to me and said, ‘You’re a hero. You didn’t sell to Notre Dame,’” Johnson said. “And I said ‘No, I’m not a hero, I’m just living.’”Tags: Eddy Street Commons, eddy street phase ii, Johnnie Johnson, Notre Dame Stadiumlast_img read more

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California Based Company Expanding Its Operation To Chautauqua County

first_imgShare:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window) Image by the CCIDA.ELLICOTT – A California based designer and manufacturer of architectural systems is expanding from the west coast to Chautauqua County. The County of Chautauqua Industrial Development announced Tuesday that Arktura plans to invest $7.3 million to expand its existing Los Angeles, California-based operations.This new plant is projected to facilitate expedited lead times to the U.S. market for its products, provide local services to east coast markets, and increase its overall production capacity.Arktura plans to hire 50 full-time employees during the first three years of operations. The company is in the process of purchasing a 134,858 sf facility located at 1 Precision Way in the Town of Ellicott, which was previously home to Acu-Rite/Heidenhain.At its February 25, 2020 board meeting, the Board of Directors for the County of Chautauqua Industrial Development unanimously voted in favor of the CCIDA authorizing the execution and delivery of a preliminary agreement with respect to Arktura’s application for financial incentives, which includes: real property tax abatements (PILOT); sales and use tax exemptions; and a mortgage recording tax exemption.Arktura has also applied for benefits/incentives through New York State Empire State Development (ESD) and Office of Community Renewal (OCR).last_img read more

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Chicago’s Countess of the Clink NeNe Leakes Is Answering Your Questions!

first_imgThis Mama walks around in Louboutins, and she’s walking them right over to Broadway.com HQ. Real Housewife and, as of November 23, Chicago’s newest Matron “Mama” Morton, NeNe Leakes will take a seat on our couch to answer your questions. Does her Mama Morton bloop? How’s she adjusting to the Broadway schedule? How does she really feel about Barbra Streisand medleys? (Because, uh, we love them.) If you want to find out, ask below, and check back in later to see NeNe answer your questions!<a data-cke-saved-href="https://broadway.wufoo.com/forms/m1j66itz0x8zs1k/" href="https://broadway.wufoo.com/forms/m1j66itz0x8zs1k/">Fill out my Wufoo form!</a> Chicago from $49.50 View Comments Related Showslast_img read more

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U.S. Federal Reserve joins network of central banks focused on financial risks of climate change

first_imgU.S. Federal Reserve joins network of central banks focused on financial risks of climate change FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Reuters:The U.S. Federal Reserve said on Tuesday it has joined an international group of central banks focused on climate change risk, a signal that the Fed could move to incorporate the impacts of global warming into its regulatory writ.The Fed’s membership in the Network of Central Banks and Supervisors for Greening the Financial System (NGFS) comes after a yearlong collaboration, the Fed said. It had been the only major global central bank besides the Reserve Bank of India that was not a member of the NGFS.“As we develop our understanding of how best to assess the impact of climate change on the financial system, we look forward to continuing and deepening our discussions with our NGFS colleagues from around the world,” Fed Chair Jerome Powell said in a statement announcing the move.For years, the Fed has stayed on the sidelines as other central banks pushed to use their regulatory and research clout to mitigate the effects of global warming, including potentially abrupt price changes from climate-related disasters that could reverberate through financial markets.But that has been changing recently. Last month, the Fed included climate change for the first time in its regular assessment of financial stability vulnerabilities. Powell has said that making sure the financial system is “resilient” against climate change fits with the Fed’s congressionally assigned mandates.[Katanga Johnson and Ann Saphir]More: Fed joins global club of peers in climate change fightlast_img read more

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Parents can meet unborn children in 3D virtual reality

first_imgThe Telegraph 21 November 2016 Family First Comment: Just a ‘blob of tissue’? Yeah right!Seeing a baby in the womb for the first time on an ultrasound is a magical moment for most parents.But a groundbreaking new scanning technology is allowing mothers and fathers to meet their unborn children in three dimensional virtual reality for the very first time.The technique works by merging ultrasound imagery with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which scans segments of the womb and foetus to build a 3D model which can be brought to life by using a virtual reality headset.Not only does it give the best ever view of a baby in the womb, but it can also help doctors pick up problems early, because it maps the entire internal structure of the foetus – not just the outside – meaning specialists can see how vital organs are developing.British experts said it could also help parents bond with their children earlier. It is even possible to 3D print a model of the baby.“We believe that these images will bring a new experience for parents when following the development of their unborn child,” said study co-author Dr Heron Werner Jr. from the Clínica de Diagnóstico por Imagem, in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.“The 3D foetal models combined with virtual reality immersive technologies may improve our understanding of anatomical characteristics and can be used for educational purposes and as a method for parents to visualize their unborn baby.”READ MORE: http://www.telegraph.co.uk/science/2016/11/21/parents-can-meet-unborn-children-first-time-3d-virtual-reality/last_img read more

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Gladbach players give up wages to help club during pandemic

first_imgRead Also: Neymar flees Paris for Brazil to self isolate amid coronavirusProfessional sides in Germany depend heavily on the income from television rights with local broadcasters paying 4.6 billion euros over a four-year deal to show matches.Gladbach played the league’s last game before the outbreak-enforced break with a 2-1 behind closed doors win over Cologne on March 11.The fixture held without fans at their Borussia Park reportedly cost the club around two million euros.FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail分享 Promoted ContentTop 10 TV Friends Who Used To Be EnemiesA Guy Turns Gray Walls And Simple Bricks Into Works Of ArtWho Is The Most Powerful Woman On Earth?The 18 Most Visited Cities In The WorldTop 10 Most Iconic Characters On TVWhich Country Is The Most Romantic In The World?6 Incredibly Strange Facts About HurricanesBirds Enjoy Living In A Gallery Space Created For Them7 Theories About The Death Of Our UniverseCan Playing Too Many Video Games Hurt Your Body?7 Things That Actually Ruin Your PhoneThe Highest Paid Football Players In The World “I didn’t have to explain much. The players know what’s going on. It’s their job, they have already informed themselves and thought about what they could do,” he added. Coaching staff and boss Marco Rose have also said they would go without their salaries. According to media reports in Germany, the decision by the likes of captain Lars Stindl, forward Alassane Plea and goalkeeper Yann Sommer will allow the side sitting fourth in the table to save one million euros ($1.07 million). On Tuesday, Borussia Dortmund’s Hans-Joachim Watzke was criticised for saying the country’s biggest clubs should refrain from financially helping the league’s smaller outfits. Loading… Borussia Moenchengladbach’s squad have offered to give up their wages to help the club’s financial situation during the coronavirus pandemic, sporting director Max Eberl said on Thursday. Alassane Plea is Borussia Moenchengladbach’s top goal scorer in the league this season Gladbach are set to lose income from broadcasting, sponsorships and ticket sales during the COVID-19 outbreak with all Bundesliga matches suspended until at least April 2. “The team has offered to forego salaries if it can help the club and its employees,” Eberl told the club’s website.Advertisementlast_img read more

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Silay drug bust yields P105-K ‘shabu’

first_imgCharges for violation of Republic Act9165, or the Comprehensive Dangerous Drugs Act of 2002 will be filed againstSenatin./PN The suspect was detained in the lockupcell of the Silay City police station. Senatin was nabbed after he sold asachet of suspected shabu to an undercover cop for P1,000 around 1:40 p.m. onApril 13, the police added. BACOLOD City – Eight sachets ofsuspected shabu valued at around P105,000 were seized in a buy-bust operationin Barangay Lantad, Silay City, Negros Occidental. The 30-year-old resident Rojie Senatinyielded the suspected illegal drugs, police said.last_img read more

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Senate bill will allow pharmacists to fill out of state prescriptions

first_imgStatewide—Living in the tri-state area and having tri-state medical care can sometimes be a hassle if you have prescriptions that currently can’t be filled in Indiana for physicians’ assistants from another state.  State Senator Jean Leising has co-authored a bill to help make this less of a hassle. Senate Bill 21 recently passed 46-3 and will move to the house for a vote.  If this bill passes the house, it provides that prescriptions can be filled from out-of-state physician assistants and that a pharmacist has a duty to honor all prescriptions issued by an advanced practice registered nurse or physician assistant if licensed under the laws of another state.last_img read more

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The US Post Office is Fully Funded Through October of 2021

first_imgThe Treasury Department loaned the U.S. Postal Service $10 billion in emergency coronavirus relief funding in late July of 2020 in exchange for proprietary information about the mail service’s most lucrative private-sector contracts.The Postal Service, subject to confidentiality restrictions, will provide Treasury copies of its 10 largest “negotiated service agreements,” or contracts with high-volume third-party shippers such as Amazon, FedEx and UPS, and receive a crucial injection of cash that postal officials say will keep the debt-laden agency solvent for at least another year, according to a copy of the loan’s term sheet obtained by The Washington Post.The Postal Service contracts with private-sector shippers for “last-mile” delivery from distribution centers to consumers’ homes, and it offers those companies small discounts because of the volume of packages they provide.Democrats are also encouraged by the Postal Service reporting better-than-expected financial results in May. The black ink is attributed to surging package volume which is eclipsing Christmastime levels. Currently, the USPS now has close to $14 billion in cash on hand.That is enough money to sustain the agency through the 2020 Presidential Election and right on through till October 2021, if package volumes remain high. The loan from Treasury will buy the Postal Service at least five more months of liquidity, but perhaps as much as a year’s more cash if package revenue continues to make up for declines in first-class mail, the agency’s most profitable product.Chief of Staff Mark Meadows says President Trump will sign a bill that includes funding for the Postal Service if Democrats negotiate a stimulus bill.Meadows added that sorting machines will not be taken off-line between now and the election. There were reports that 10% of machines were being decommissioned.last_img read more

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Local legend: Schayes reflects on Hall of Fame career as face of Syracuse Nationals

first_imgDolph Schayes could do everything on a basketball court besides dunk. But players didn’t do that in his time anyway.Schayes redefined what it meant to be a big man in the NBA, even as he persisted with a rooted-to-the-ground, two-handed set shot well into the era of the jumper. Yet after thinking about what it was that made him special, how he cemented his place among the greatest of all time, Schayes reduces his on-court brilliance to near nothingness.“If you’re tall, you have a distinct advantage,” he said. “See, the basket’s 10 feet off the ground, so the closer you are to the basket, the easier to rebound and all that stuff.”And so Schayes underlines the life outlook that produced his own legend. Basketball was always a game for Schayes, who was the franchise player for the Syracuse Nationals from 1948-1963 and is voted one of the 50 greatest players in NBA history.The 12-time All-Star revolutionized the post position by moving beyond it. Men of his stature were expected to work the paint and the boards, and little else. But Schayes was constantly moving.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textGrowing up in the Bronx during the Great Depression, delivering laundry for change, the notion that he could be paid to play the sport was foreign.His game was shaped by what he considers the purest form of basketball in the Bronx schoolyards of Public School 91 and Junior High 79 (Preston). Playing three-on-three each day allowed Schayes to transcend the pigeon-holing dimensions of his outsized body and the sport.“When you’re 6 (feet) 5 (inches) and you’re 11 years old, you’re the same; just play center and stay inside,” he said. “But when we played basketball I did everything. I passed, I dribbled, I played outside.”During his Hall of Fame career in Syracuse, the 6-foot-8-inch Schayes towered over any guards that could keep up with him on the perimeter.“He would play the strong forward, what they call today — comparing with the terms that they use today and what they expect that particular position person to do,” former SU guard Manny Breland said. “And he was the personification of that particular position in terms of ability to shoot, to set and put the ball on the floor, and get to the hoop and those kinds of things. And also rebound.”After winning Rookie of the Year in 1949, Schayes led the Nationals in scoring for 12 straight seasons. Yet Schayes was no distanced superstar. It was not becoming of the man or the era.Schayes frequented the Onondaga War Memorial downtown for SU games, where he watched the collegiate players he occasionally scrimmaged with after Nationals practices.“Those guys, particularly Dolph, would come,” Breland said. “And so there was that kind of camaraderie; the bond was kind of built because we were ballplayers, even though he was a pro and I was in college.”It was at one such game in 1951 that he was introduced to Naomi Gross. She wore a fur-collared coat that day as did Schayes. And when they met, a static spark flew between the two.They married later that year. It was “a whirlwind courtship.”Schayes was a first-round draft pick twice. The New York Knicks chose him fourth in the 1948 Basketball Association of America draft and the Tri-Cities Blackhawks picked him first in the National Basketball League before trading his rights to Syracuse.A representative from the Knicks called Schayes, who still lived at home and commuted to New York University’s Bronx campus. New York offered him a league-maximum contract worth $5,000.The Nats sent their owner Danny Biasone and general manager Leo Ferris down to Manhattan, where they met Schayes and his father at the Paramount Hotel. They offered him a $7,500 contract. Then Ferris reached into his pocket for Schayes’ signing bonus.He took out 500 $1 bills.“To a guy who worked for nickels and dimes delivering dry cleaning, that looked like a lot of money,” Schayes said. “We decided since I’ll only play a year or two, because I have a college degree and so, we took the money.”Two seasons was all it took for Schayes to become the team’s leading scorer. He led the league in scoring during the 1950s and became the first player in NBA history to 15,000 points.Schayes retired from playing in 1964 after a legendary career, in which he led the Nationals to the 1954-55 NBA championship and saw the team become the Philadelphia 76ers in 1963. He then coached the 76ers through the winter, and owned and operated a camp on Lake George in the summer.The camp needed a golf instructor, so he hired the recent SU graduate Jim Boeheim.For six summers, Boeheim and Schayes teamed up in the Warren County summer camp league. Schayes would grab three other counselors and Boeheim. They never lost. Schayes was still a fierce competitor.“Boeheim used to piss me off because he never passed me the ball; he kept shooting it,” Schayes joked.  “I’d say, ‘Jim, I’m the owner, you got to pass me the ball.’”“Not true, not true,” Boeheim said with a chuckle. “But he did most of the rebounding, the hard dirty work, and I did most of the shooting on the team.”Schayes did win NBA Coach of the Year in 1966, but he doesn’t take much credit for the honor.“I had a very good team. I had a guy named Wilt Chamberlain. Did you ever hear of Wilt? And also Hal Greer, Billy Cunningham, pretty good players,” Schayes said of his fellow Hall of Famers. “So I would just say ‘All right guys, go out and play.’”No matter how the voting sportswriters saw the season, for Schayes, it couldn’t be about him.Nearly five decades after his playing career, Schayes hunches over to around 6 feet 2 inches in his otherwise plain real estate office. He is pointing and reminiscing in front of an “NBA 50th Anniversary All-Time Team” poster.He’s on it with Jordan, Bird, Magic, all the greats, but his finger — and his memory — is fixed on the Celtics’ John Havlicek.“He stole the ball you know,” Schayes said, referring to the immortalized play in which Havlicek stole Hal Greer’s inbounds pass and the 1966 Eastern Conference championship from Schayes and Philadelphia.The secretary is tiring of Schayes’ ramblings. She wants him to point to his own image on the poster.“Where are you, Dolph?” she says.So he raises his hand from Havlicek for the first time since he inched his aging frame to the wall. He brings his right hand to chest height and turns his index finger on his own chest.“I’m right here.” Comments Related Stories Nationals’ great Schayes enjoys 2nd career as landlordHalf a century later, Syracuse Nationals remembered as tough, elite team that provided city with a pulseShot clock originated in Nationals to remedy basketball’s slow pace Facebook Twitter Google+center_img Published on November 1, 2012 at 1:56 am Contact Jacob: [email protected] | @Jacob_Klinger_last_img read more

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