Making commitment count

first_imgHarvard students have commitment issues. I write not of commitments within the juicy domain of romantic relationships, but of co-curriculars — engagements beyond the classroom that support our personal and professional development. It is hard to remain committed to something at the epicenter of the world’s most prestigious university, where alluring carrots dangle before students in every which way.The dizzying abundance of resources at Harvard can lead to carrot overdose. Fellowship opportunities are scattered across campus, fluorescent flyers from laboratories ask for undergraduate researchers, finance firms scream “apply!” in inboxes, former White House officials offer positions for student leadership in their study groups, and more than 400 tantalizing student organizations look to lasso members. The Pokémon tagline “Gotta catch ’em all” resounds while FOMO, fear of missing out, abounds. The more commitments you collect, the better. The busier, the better.Students spar with their peers, competing in the game of sleeplessness; the person who sacrifices the most slumber reigns supreme in the coliseum of achievement. Students are constantly reminded of the opportunities, the opportunities. What a shame to miss out on all the opportunities! So we ascribe to overscheduled lives governed by Technicolor boxes in Google calendars. In the struggle to keep up with the Joneses, or the Crimsons, our commitments multiply.I have felt the crushing pressure of the opportunities, the opportunities. I have experienced the hollow absence of commitment in scurrying from one meeting to the next, missing the broader picture of my purpose and my contributions in college. I have struggled as that overscheduled, frazzled student. As a student past the halfway point of my time here who was recently reminded at Junior Parents Weekend by President Drew Faust that 454 days remained in my undergraduate career, I was compelled to reflect on my time spent on campus. I asked myself, “What have I committed myself to?” The age-old question “Is it better to hold many commitments well, or just a few extremely well?” buzzed in my brain. Letting those inquiries marinate, my attention floated to my proudest achievement at Harvard, the one that I had poured my heart, soul, and hours upon hours into: the Athena Program.Since I was a first-year, I committed myself to Athena, a gender empowerment and mentoring program run out of the Phillips Brooks House Association (Harvard’s student-led, community-based nonprofit) that leads a biannual conference. I have devoted more than 500 hours to this program, which embodies the spirit of my Harvard education. It has taught me the importance of commitment. It has, more than any course, prepared me for life beyond the ivy gates.Athena embraced me for the first time at a retreat is in the Harvard College Women’s Center (a spectacular space that has supported and housed our programming and served, more or less, as an extension of my room). My peers plunged into a reflective identity activity within minutes of meeting each other. We were asked to list 13 aspects of our identity and winnow our list down to three, and share which aspects of ourselves we eliminated, if we felt comfortable. This agonizing activity revealed that we are inherently intersectional beings, a compilation of interwoven identities. After plowing past the initial discomfort of revealing axes of myself to new people, I felt the presence of an extraordinary community that would challenge me to be more thoughtful in my life. I was hooked.This intimate family feeling permeated our meetings, which began with each member sharing a peak (highlight of the week), valley (lowlight of the week), and a gender river (any thought related to gender that gave pause). We discussed the impact of our programming. I began as a member of the outreach team that built contacts with guidance counselors, high school students, and community leaders to bring young people to the conference.I’ve led workshops on goal setting, built personal and professional relationships with my supportive co-directors, helped to manage a budget, built up a stipend program to compensate mentees for their contributions, and learned about life and leadership from the program directors who preceded me. The guidance of these directors built confidence in me to direct the program, which I have now for almost two years.My long-term commitment to Athena has helped me to see its evolution, and has helped me learn from my mistakes. The scope and size of our  program has swelled. We opened our program to members of all genders to promote open dialogue and gender equality. During my involvement, I have developed curriculum, built my public speaking skills, and learned about Boston communities. I discovered that it is wise to check citywide events before selecting a conference date. (We mistakenly scheduled a conference during the Walk for Hunger.) I acted rashly in heated decision-making moments, and I apologized. I learned to respond more promptly to emails, and to encourage reserved mentees to speak up through engaging techniques. I learned to actively appreciate others. I’ve built a social, emotional, and professional skill set I’ll keep with me for the rest of my life. For me, commitment created community.My collection of the colored pins that we distribute on Conference Day reminds me of my commitment, and how my dedication to Athena has supported my growth. I’ve participated in the creation of four conferences: “Define Your Own Beauty,” “The Power of You(th),” “Blasting Through Stereotypes,” and “Born This Way?,” and our most recent conference, “Growing Up Gendered.” From leading close readings of Lady Gaga’s lyrics to boldly shouting “No!” in the Harvard University Police Department’s Rape Aggression Defense workshop to hearing mentees speak truth to power at the coffeehouse for self-expression, each conference inspires a new sense of possibility and passion in me that I experience in no other realm of my life. Each conference also brings new students, glimmering insights, and ideas for improvement.Alas, Harvard students (myself included) have commitment issues. I am not concerned by the willingness of my peers to plunge into new experiences like some do into the Charles River off Weeks Bridge. What does concern me, though, is the excessive number of commitments students are motivated to plunge into. Ironically, the more commitments one has, the less committed one is; yet they are labeled commitments all the same. I have found that I can only slice myself into so many parts; I’ve distributed myself at times in a way that is unsustainable, unhealthy. I’m still working through managing my commitments, but I have taken the first step in identifying what matters most to me and throwing myself into it, while still keeping space to explore new frontiers.As I transition out of Athena leadership, I reflect on the competencies the program has built in me. I do not aim to answer whether having one main commitment is superior to having several. I do, however, hope to encourage my peers to consider giving more than a little of themselves to something, and to stick with it for a stretch of time. We need to strike a balance between the opportunities, the opportunities, and the most meaningful commitments in our lives. My experience has shown that great growth comes from the latter. Stay with something long enough to feel its pulse, to be uncomfortable, to fail, to see change, and to celebrate successes, mistakes too.I’ve committed, even though I’ve failed extravagantly, struggled with complex topics of gender and identity, led a fundraiser that flopped, and facilitated poor trainings. But I’ve also helped mentees with college essays, helped a mentee who will be the first in her family to attend college, involved mentee parents, organized a strong conference programming team, and cultivated an empowering community where youth can express themselves. Because of all that, I am a more loving person, a more thoughtful person, and a more confident person. I committed.If you’re an undergraduate or graduate student and have an essay to share about life at Harvard, please email your ideas to Jim Concannon, the Gazette’s news editor, at [email protected]last_img read more

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Office for Student Success helps Belles thrive

first_imgThe Saint Mary’s Office for Student Success is ushering in the fall semester with its Academic Skills & Strategies Workshops starting Wednesday.Diane Fox, director of the Office for Student Success, started the series when the office first opened 10 years ago with the hope to achieve two goals: To help freshman get oriented and help upperclassmen stay motivated, she said.“Nothing is more frustrating than a professor saying to his student, ‘You should have studied more,’” Fox said. “I want to give students specific strategies to provide answers to all their questions about how to be successful in college.”Alexis Fady, a sophomore majoring in business administration with international business and marketing concentrations, began attending the workshops the fall of her first year at Saint Mary’s.“The main reason why I went was because my professors offered extra credit if we attended the workshops but I kept going because of Fox,” Fady said. “She cares about every person who is in that room, whether it’s their first time there or their hundredth. You don’t have to do everything she says and the tips won’t always match your learning style, but there is always someone who benefits from the variety of tips.”Sophomore Lauren Honkamp, a social work major, agreed the main reason she found the workshops so successful was because of Fox’s charismatic approach to student success.“I started attending the sessions because going into my first year, I was really stressed about the transition to college and how to manage my time, split up my homework and study for tests,” she said. “That was just something I felt unprepared for. Fox was the only person I felt comfortable going to and her tips were simple things that you wouldn’t think of initially but which really helped me not get stressed about my workload and get everything done on time.”Fox said she utilizes a variety of methods and strategies in helping students achieve success at the College, even if they don’t know where to start.“Students genuinely want to do well, but they don’t always know how to do well so I am able to give them some tools to achieve their goals,” Fox said. “Giving them different things to do gives them a very concrete way to accomplish what they want.”Fady said she was able to implement the study skills she learned at one of the workshops to prepare for finals.“The workshops are very strategically planned to correspond with what you’re going through in college,” Fady said. “Fox gave us a lot of useful study tips around finals and I really took everything she said to heart, put in a lot of effort, and got high grades on my tests.”The first workshop is titled “Be Ready to Learn,” Fox said.“This first meeting is a preview: What can I get in in 30 minutes which students should have for the first weeks that will help them thereafter?” she said. “It lets students know that we are all in this together and that there are resources available to them. The other sessions are more detailed and more strategy specific.”The sessions will continue through November and will cover topics ranging from time management to preparing for exams. Each workshop takes place twice to maximize accessibility and they are open to anyone who wants to make their academic year a success.Fady said the session was helpful in giving her a foundation for her success.“It was really worth it for me to give just 30 minutes of my time to learn things which are fundamental to succeeding in college and beyond,” Fady said.Tags: Office of Student Success, saint mary’s, successlast_img read more

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Stacher’s Picks

first_imgAlly Stacher knows a thing or two about riding bikes. The former pro road cyclist was one of the best domestiques in the sport, competing in Europe’s biggest races, but this year, she jumped head first into mountain biking, a discipline she didn’t have much experience with. So far, so good. Stacher landed on the podium at the National Championships in the women’s pro division and was all set to win the Pisgah Stage Race when she blew a chain during the last stage. “I’m a princess roadie who’s used to racing in Europe with team mechanics. I didn’t know how to fix the chain, so I had to wait 25 minutes for help.” Stacher’s working on her mechanic skills, but she also has her hands full with her company that makes Ally’s Bar, a vegan-friendly bar that actually tastes good (think sweet potatoes, dates, cashews…). Needless to say, she never leaves home without a few of her own bars, but here are five more pieces of gear she can’t live without.Kask ProTone_FIXNO. 1 Kask ProToneI’m a big helmet fan. You should protect your head. These are super lightweight helmets out of Italy. I’ve taken a few spills in them and haven’t had any problems. They’re really comfortable too, with good padding and leather straps that just feel nice. $299.95; kask.itFocus Raven 29_FIXNO. 2 Focus RavenIt’s a hard tail, light and fast, and it handles amazingly. You can huck over anything on that thing. It’s one of the most fun bikes I’ve ever ridden. Women’s specific bikes are fine for people who fit them, but I’m taller, I need a men’s medium. This bike fits well. $3,899; focus-bikes.comOakley_FIXNO. 3 Oakley Radar SunglassesYou should always look good. If you look good, you feel good and you perform well. I also like the transitional lenses in these. It gets so dark inside the woods, you need clear lenses, but then you’re on gravel in the sun and you need darker lenses. They transition super well. $160; oakley.comreverb stealth_FIX NO. 4 RockShox Reverb Stealth Dropper PostI ride the shit out of Pisgah on that dropper post. If you ride Pisgah, it’s technical and rooty, with drops and steep pitches. You have to work for every descent. Having this dropper post is a game changer for riding in Pisgah. $324; sram.comtorch ultralite_FIXNO. 5 I-9 Torch Ultralite WheelsI never leave home without them. They’re really fast and roll amazing. Pisgah is so challenging, it’s good to have really reliable wheels that you can try stuff with. And they’re color coordinated with my bike. $1,195; industrynine.netNO. 6 Velocio Kit (NOT PICTURED)This is a really high end cycling kit. It costs more, but when you put it on, you understand why. The chamois in these shorts is so freaking comfortable. You get what you pay for. And the kit makes me look really fast. $169; velocio.ccibexW2SportT_FIXNO. 7 Ibex Ace ShirtThe Ace performs equally well on a steep mountain trail run and a casual pub crawl. The Merino wool wicks moisture superbly and feels as good as it looks. $115; ibex.commerrell-mix-master-move2_FIXNO. 8 Merrell Mix Master Move 2Looking for a PR shoe? This minimalist, versatile trail shoe with a 4mm drop weighs in at 8.4 ounces and performs well on roads as on gnarly singletrack. $100; merrell.comIceMule Pro XLarge Back View 300.jpgNO. 9 IceMule Classic CoolerDitch the clunky beast of a cooler you’ve been lugging and strap on an Icemule. The portable, lightweight, wearable cooler rolls up, floats, and keeps ice cool for 24 hours. After a hot, sweaty day of adventure, the Icemule will ensure a cold beverage awaits. $100; icemulecooler.comM-3179-90-dustyolive-1NO. 10 Gramicci Morrison Organic ShirtA blend of certified organic cotton and herbicide-free durable hemp, the V-neck wicks away moisture quickly and performs well in intense August heat. Unlike synthetics, it doesn’t smell or scratch. It’s a clean, comfortable fit that performs like a champ. $45; gramicci.comlast_img read more

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Big Revamp of Pentagon’s Troubled Mission to Find Missing Soldiers Looks a Lot Like Old Revamp

first_imgWith Congressional pressure and media scrutiny intensifying, the defense secretary came out with a bold plan to fix the Pentagon’s struggling mission to recover remains of missing service members: reorganize the effort into a new agency.“This new organization provides an efficient management structure for pursuing our goal of obtaining the fullest possible accounting for all missing Americans. Resolving POW/MIA issues is of the highest national priority and we will continue to work vigorously toward this end.”Those remarks easily could have come from Secretary of Defense Chuck Hagel in March when he announced just such a change. But they were actually made two decades ago, by then-Secretary of Defense Les Aspin when the Pentagon first tried restructuring the bureaucracy as a way to solve troubling issues with the effort. Another consolidation, accompanied by similar rhetoric, happened in 2003.The Pentagon spends about $100 million annually to recover and identify missing service members from the Vietnam War, Korean War and World War II, but identified just 60 last year – far short of the 200 per year mandated by Congress starting next year. A ProPublica and NPR investigation found that the mission was hampered by outdated science, overlapping bureaucracy and poor leadership.On March 31, Hagel said that the two major agencies in charge 2014 the Joint Prisoners of War/Missing in Action Accounting Command, or J-PAC, and the Defense Prisoners of War and Missing Personnel Office, or DPMO 2013 would be consolidated into one to streamline the inefficient, duplicative process.This latest restructuring is the broadest one yet, taking on the science used to make identifications and creating public-private partnerships, but it’s unclear whether it will be a reorganization just on paper like it was in the past. Indeed, the two long-troubled, soon-to-be combined agencies, J-PAC and DPMO, are themselves the product of the earlier consolidations.Critics on Capitol Hill, in family advocacy groups and among former employees of the agencies all said that in order to have meaningful, lasting impact the changes must go beyond bureaucratic reshuffling to instead include new leadership.“Any time you have a change that is truly philosophical it’s very difficult to accomplish that if the people being tasked with it still believe in the old ways of doing things,” Cmdr. Renee Richardson, a former DPMO staffer, said.Given the “stories we’re being told, there definitely should be some people who are fired,” Sen. Claire McCaskill, who was one of the vocal critics on the Hill, said in an interview earlier this year.Acting Under Secretary of Defense for Policy Michael Lumpkin, who is spearheading the changes, said at the time of the announcement that the new agency will be fundamentally new and different, ridding the effort of “outdated, institutionalized thinking.”But asked if anyone was being held accountable for the problems that led to the need for changes, Lumpkin referred to a “structurally flawed” system rather than leadership.The agencies’ current leaders might stay a part of the new as-yet-unnamed agency. Although the positions of DPMO director and J-PAC commander will disappear along with the organizations when the new agency is formed in the next 18 months, Lumpkin said, the people who held those positions “may be reclaimed” in the new organization.The only personnel changes that have been announced are a director for the new agency who will report to the under secretary of defense for policy and an Armed Forces Medical Examiner who will be in charge of making identifications and overseeing the scientific operations of the lab. The latter strips Tom Holland, J-PAC’s longtime scientific director, of his primary authority, but Lumpkin wouldn’t comment on whether Holland would be a part of the new agency.ProPublica and NPR reported that under Holland’s leadership, the laboratory has not used DNA as the first step in identifying remains, even though DNA has been the centerpiece of similar efforts worldwide for more than a decade.Lumpkin did say that Hagel was putting the director of the new agency under the Office of the Secretary of Defense because he wanted someone he could hold accountable for the mission’s responsibilities – what Lumpkin called “a single belly button.”The civilian leadership of DPMO and J-PAC has been entrenched for decades. Holland has been there since 1992. Johnie Webb, the deputy commander for external relations, has been with J-PAC since 1983. The current director of DPMO, retired Brig. Gen. W. Montague “Que” Winfield, was the first commander of J-PAC.Complicating matters, for years J-PAC and DPMO have battled each other for territory, authority and responsibility.Ann Mills-Griffith, founder of the lobbying group National League of POW/MIA Families, described the infighting as “destructive bickering.”“It’s such a noble mission…every person wants the same thing,” said current J-PAC commander Gen. Kelly McKeague. “Where it breaks down – and this is where I shake my head – is the ‘how.’”There was also feuding within J-PAC. There have been dozens of complaints about management and a hostile work environment – and employees who left with cash settlements.With the struggle to make more identifications, Mark Leney, a former J-PAC anthropologist, said it’s hard to discern what “are technical difficulties of a unique mission to execute and what are ordinary issues of poor management.”The Pentagon’s inspector general is investigating problems with the MIA effort, an inquiry that, according to several people who have been interviewed for it, is expected to address management and leadership issues.The new agency will also face questions about mission priorities.The Pentagon has long focused its recovery efforts on troops missing from the Vietnam War, a decision that experts say might not be the best use of its resources now. In fiscal year 2013, for example, J-PAC spent 65 percent of its field mission budget in Southeast Asia, but identified just nine Vietnam veterans.In part, this is because the soil in Southeast Asia is so acidic it eats away at bones, essentially dissolving them. Several current and former J-PAC scientists have said that time might have run out there – there just may not be bones left to find.Still, it remains politically delicate to cross advocates for Vietnam vets, some of whom have accused the government of covering up the existence of live POWs.Mills-Griffiths, the most prominent and well-connected advocate for those missing from Vietnam, has long pushed to keep Vietnam at the forefront of MIA recovery efforts. Hagel personally thanked her at his press conference announcing the reorganization, and many of its features were recommended by her.In a memo to Hagel, Mills-Griffiths blamed J-PAC’s decision to not increase field operations in Vietnam in part on a “misplaced focus by some on remains recoveries related to WWII as a means of increasing the number of IDs.”Lisa Phillips, founder of WWII Families for the Return of the Missing, said, “We want exactly as Congress mandated. The fullest possible accounting of all POW MIA services members, regardless of the circumstances of the loss.”Mills-Griffiths, whose brother is among the missing from Vietnam, has said the MIA effort was started for Vietnam vets, so families from other wars need “to stand in line“2013 raising the ire of advocates for World War II and Korean War veterans. But she has also said it isn’t a competition. Efforts on behalf of one war’s veterans shouldn’t be at the expense of others, she said.Some families of troops missing in Southeast Asia have fought the disinterment of almost 10,000 troops buried as unknown casualties of the Korean War and World War II. That discord led to a 2009 DPMO memo saying that exhuming the graves of unknowns and using DNA to try to identify them should take a back seat to finding remains of service members still lost on the battlefield.Lumpkin said the new agency would pursue more disinterments, but didn’t provide any details. J-PAC currently only exhumes remains in about 4 percent of the cases in which such a step is recommended. The average disinterment costs about $1,000 – significantly less than field operations.Some families of missing troops from World War II and their advocates are hoping they will benefit from the move to embrace public-private partnerships, which could free their loved ones’ cases from the government’s grasp and allow them to move forward faster. Sign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York last_img read more

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Washington state nursing home on lockdown after two cases of coronavirus found

first_imgThe nursing home said members of its corporate clinical team were on site to provide assistance and that the home was in contact with the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Washington Health Department.On Saturday, officials said a Washington state man in his 50s with underlying health issues became the United States’ first fatality from thecoronavirus.The patient, who was chronically ill before contracting COVID-19, died at EvergreenHealth Hospital in Kirkland, near Seattle, and officials are unsure how he was exposed to the virus, said Jeffrey Duchin, head of the Washington state Health Department’s communicable disease unit.The fast-spreading virus has infected around 83,000 people in more than 50 countries, with about 70 cases in the United States.Topics : The two cases, announced on Saturday by Washington state officials, involved a worker who is in her 40s and in satisfactory condition and a 70-year-old woman who lived there and is in serious condition.State officials said an additional 27 residents of the nursing home and 25 staff members were reporting symptoms of the virus, which can be similar to that of the common flu.”Concerned family members or responsible parties may call our facility,” the statement said. “The facility is currently placing a hold on admissions as well to fully focus on our current residents and associates.”A representative for the nursing home could not be reached by Reuters on Sunday for further comment. A nursing home near Seattle is locked down after a resident and a worker were found to have the coronavirus, officials at the home said, and two other cases in the area were confirmed on Sunday.Officials with King County Public Health said the two latest cases involved men in their 60s with underlying medical issues. Both were listed in critical condition, one at Valley Medical Center, and the other at Virginia Mason Medical Center.Separately, officials at the Life Care Center of Kirkland said in a statement late on Saturday that it was not accepting new patients or allowing visitors, family or vendors into the facility while officials focus on the health of the current residents and staff.last_img read more

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Home learning hindered by technology gap, Nadiem acknowledges

first_imgEducation and Culture Minister Nadiem Makarim has acknowledged that technological discrepancies between schools have reduced the effectiveness of home-based learning, a program launched to accommodate COVID-19 distancing measures.The minister said schools in certain regions were progressing slowly and were at risk of being unable to catch up to others academically. Other schools had taken to distance learning through the use of low- and high-tech tools.“We still need time to analyze the overall effectiveness of home-based learning. However, what we do know is we have a lot of anecdotal evidence about challenges surrounding the online learning process,” the minister said on Thursday. He said the effectiveness of home-based learning was related to the educational system’s comfort in adopting new technology.Nadiem said education technology was being adopted at an unprecedented rate as parents, teachers and students adjusted to the demands of distance learning under COVID-19.“It can heavily accelerate technology adoption in education in the future. This is a very encouraging trend.”Read also: Tips from parents on helping children study at home during COVID-19 outbreak Technology adoption remains a challenge for the Indonesian education system.A 2019 report issued by global mobile communications industry body GSMA demonstrated a wide digital gap between people living in urban and rural areas. About 45 percent of Indonesians live in rural areas.Indonesia has 170 million internet users. However, the government has said that digital literacy in Indonesia is still relatively low, causing hurdles for teachers, students and parents wanting to engage in a tech-based education.Nadiem said he believed there were many possible solutions depending on each school’s access to and adoption of technology. He said the government was investigating what would work.“When we return to school after this crisis, we’ll be able to scale up measures that we know are working for certain segments of our educational system,” the minister said.Topics :last_img read more

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Boss of The Adventure Traveller, Dean Tuckwell’s favourite holiday destination is his home

first_img45 Sunnycrest Drive, Terranora.HIGH-END hotel style combines with family-inspired practicality at this jaw-dropping Terranora mansion. For most homebuyers, a convenient location seals the deal but for homeowners Dean Tuckwell and his wife Marcella Chavarria it was a house that made them feel miles away. 45 Sunnycrest Drive, Terranora.More from news02:37Purchasers snap up every residence in the $40 million Siarn Palm Beach North6 hours ago02:37International architect Desmond Brooks selling luxury beach villa1 day ago“In the evenings you feel as if you are living in the Hollywood hills, you’re looking down at the twinkling Tweed Valley.“It’s breathtaking.” Sprawled across a 4017sq m block, the home lets the outside in with louvred windows and sliding doors. 45 Sunnycrest Drive, Terranora.“When we first bought the home we decided to book a trip to a village in Bali called Ubud,” Mr Tuckwell said. “The village is known for its beautiful art and we got an awful lot of inspiration that we managed to fill a whole shipping container with homewares and interiors. 45 Sunnycrest Drive, Terranora.“It was the house that originally drew my wife and I to Terranora, we saw it in the paper one day and had to check it out,” Mr Tuckwell said. “The house was so stunning that we couldn’t resist not buying it and we decided we could put up with the extra commute to work for a beautiful home. 45 Sunnycrest Drive, Terranora.Hotel-inspired hanging daybeds from Cambodia feature on the timber deck.“I work from home half the week and the views are a nice perk,” Mr Tuckwell said. 45 Sunnycrest Drive, Terranora.The boss of Brisbane-based travel company, The Adventure Traveller, and his candle-making wife who is the mastermind behind Velas scented candles, bought the sprawling retreat three-and-a-half years ago. center_img 45 Sunnycrest Drive, Terranora.“We also brought back Indonesian fishing boats and used them as a light decoration outside.” 45 Sunnycrest Drive, Terranora.An open fireplace, stone benchtops, timber flooring and library add a touch of luxury to the functional living spaces. The travel guru, who has visited Bali more than 20 times, said he and his wife wanted to create a hotel style at home. 45 Sunnycrest Drive, Terranora. 45 Sunnycrest Drive, Terranora.The couple said they added the deck in but their favourite addition was the garden bathroom. “I have wanted to design an outdoor shower for 25 years and this property was perfect for it,” Mr Tuckwell said. last_img read more

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Simeone: ‘I want Atletico move’

first_img The 25-year-old then explained how he modelled his game around the Juventus No 9. “Pipita Higuain [is my role model], without a doubt. I really like how he gets around the pitch and in the box. “When Juventus play, I watch Pipita see how he moves.” read also:Simeone hails Carrasco’s impact in Barcelona draw Simeone has six caps and one goal for Argentina but has not played for them since September 2018. “I’d give my life to play for Argentina again. It’s the first thing that crosses my mind every time I go out on the pitch.” FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail分享 Loading… Cagliari’s Giovanni Simeone has admitted he wants to play for Atletico Madrid ‘more than anything else’ and considers Gonzalo Higuain his role model. Giovanni is the son of Atletico boss Diego Simeone, but the striker made it clear he would still sign for the Spaniards even without his father managing them. “More than anything else,” he told ESPN when asked if he would like to play for Los Colchoneros. “[That is] because I always wanted to go there as a young lad. It’s inevitable that I’d like to go there at some point. “My dad coaches them, but even if he wasn’t there I’d still like to go because that’s what I’ve dreamt of since I was a child and that’s what I want. “I still hope he can become my coach one day, even if it’s hard to sign for a team that coaches a father.”Advertisementcenter_img Promoted Content7 Ways To Understand Your Girlfriend Better10 Gorgeous Bollywood Divas Who Earn A Lot9 Facts You Should Know Before Getting A TattooCouples Who Celebrated Their Union In A Unique, Unforgettable WayThe Very Last Bitcoin Will Be Mined Around 2140. Read More8 Superfoods For Growing Hair Back And Stimulating Its Growth2020 Tattoo Trends: Here’s What You’ll See This Year7 Truly Incredible Facts About Black Holes7 Worst Things To Do To Your PhoneBest & Worst Celebrity Endorsed Games Ever Made7 Ways To Understand Your Girlfriend Better10 TV Characters Who Were Destined To Become Iconiclast_img read more

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West Florida Defeats Rollins In the Overtime

first_imgWest Florida Defeats Rollins In the Overtime Share Sept. 8, 2007Box ScoreWINTER PARK, Fla. – Playing its third away match in a row, the West Florida Argonauts (2-2-0) defeated the Rollins Tars (2-3-0) Friday afternoon at the Barker Family Stadium in Winter Park, Fla. The match needed more than the usual 90 minutes to be decided. The Argonauts finally scored in the golden goal three minutes into overtime claiming their second win of the season.In the first half both teams were pretty even, keeping the possession of the ball for about the same period of time. However, the Tars shot on goal eight times, while the Argonauts shot six times, with four saves each. Head Coach Joe Bartlinski used the strategy of consistently substituting players, making it a constant rotation in attempt to keep players with fresh legs on the field so they would be able to remain running at strong pace for the whole match.In the second half, the Argonauts kept the possession of the ball longer than the Tars and had more gas in the tank, thus the Argonauts dictated the pace of the game. Both teams had good opportunities to score in the second half, however none were not successful sending the game into overtime. The Extra period is played in two 10 minute halves with a sudden death rule, which means that the first team to score would be declared the winner.When the first overtime started, the Argonauts tried not giving any spaces to their opponents. After two minutes of play junior defense/midfield Lura Carter stole the ball and ran towards the goal in a quick play and passed to sophomore midfield/forward Dernelle Mascall who got two opponents to mark her up and letting Jodi Galucci get free in the box. Mascall passed to Galucci who just needed to beat the keeper in the breakaway to score and give the Argonauts the second win of the season.West Florida will next face Florida Southern College in Lakeland, Fla. On Sunday 1:00pm CT. Fans can follow the action with “Live Stats” at goargos.com on the Women’s Soccer home page. (By Gui Amaral Jasmin) Print Friendly Versionlast_img read more

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Jones: Sunderland have missed out

first_img They are 14th in the Barclays Premier League, four points above the drop zone, and Jones knows they have missed an opportunity after their 1-0 derby win at Newcastle. “It could easily have been two wins, and that would have made it three wins on the bounce after Newcastle,” said Jones, ahead of New Year’s Day trip to Manchester City. “When Villa went down to 10 men, we saw how we need to improve in the final third – create more chances and take more chances. “At times, we looked a bit vulnerable because we were so gung ho. “But we feel it’s two points lost. The gaffer knows how disappointed we are as a collective. “I don’t think he felt the need to rant and rave afterwards. It was just a general discussion.” Jones played against Hull and Villa after overcoming hamstring problems and feels the two games prove his injury woes are over. “Every time it happens, and unfortunately for me it’s happened a few times over the last year, there’s always a big inquest,” the 27-year-old told the Sunderland Echo. “You have a chat about it and you want to get to the bottom of it. “One of the things (former club) West Brom had talked about was seeing this particular specialist. “The Sunderland staff thought there was a need for it as well, and I had a number of injections into the nerve. “In my eyes, it’s worked to play two games in three days. “To be honest, I knew personally that the last one was the worst one I had.” The Black Cats drew 0-0 at Aston Villa on Sunday despite the hosts playing most of the second half with 10 men. Fabian Delph was sent off but Gus Poyet’s side could not break them down, 48 hours after losing 3-1 to Hull. Press Association Billy Jones knows Sunderland have blown the chance to put serious distance between them and the bottom three.last_img read more

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