Video Of moe.’s First Performance Of Steely Dan’s ‘Bodhisattva’ Since 2003 Has Surfaced

first_imgmoe. came to New York, NY this past weekend, playing three nights at the Big Apple with shows at Stage 48 and the PlayStation Theater. Among hte many highlights from the three days of music were two major bust-out classic rock covers, including a version of Neil Young’s “Down By The River” for the first time since 2002, as well as Steely Dan’s “Bodhisattva” for the first time since 2003.The covers are certainly exemplary of the band’s overall devotion to their fanbase, eager to pull out all the stops for the New York audience so close to their roots. Since celebrating their 25th anniversary in 2015, moe. has been playing some of their best music, including a Star Wars-themed Halloween for the ages.Thanks to Mike Maciunski, we have full video of the encore “Bodhisattva,” following the traditional announcements section from guitarist Al Schnier. Watch “Al.nnouncements-Bodhisattva,” below:You can also check out fan-shot footage of “Down By The River” by following this link. If you can’t get enough of this 3/18 show from the PlayStation, there’s full audio as well, courtesy of taper Brian V. Enjoy:last_img read more

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DARKSIDE’s Dave Harrington To Deliver Acid Test-Style Grooves At Brooklyn Comes Alive

first_img***Tickets Are On Sale Now!***To find out more about ticketing, VIP options, and lodging, head to the festival website. Brooklyn Comes Alive is merely three days away! The 2-day multi-venue festival takes place September 23rd and 24th at Brooklyn Bowl, Music Hall of Williamsburg, and Schimanski and boasts over 100+ artists from across the musical spectrum. By purchasing a ticket to the massive New Orleans-style event, you receive a bracelet that allows you to walk into any of the venues to catch once-in-a-lifetime, collaborative sets, which run from noon until the wee hours of the morning. Folks can also buy individual tickets for just the late-night sets, which start at midnight each day.Purchase tickets to Brooklyn Comes Alive here!Though there are plenty of late-night acts each day to keep the party going ’til early in the morning, one show you should definitely have on your radar is Dave Harrington’s Merry Pranksters, which will be going down at Music Hall of Williamsburg from 12 am to 1:30 am on Saturday, September 23rd (technically, early morning of September 24th). Dave Harrington, formerly the guitar player in crossover electronic group Darkside, has become an in-demand player in the New York music scene. With the Merry Pranksters, Harrington takes the free-flowing spirit of the psychedelic, mind-expanding ethos and turns it on its head by focusing on groove-based improvisations.For the project, Dave Harrington has tapped a rotating cast of musical characters to Brooklyn Comes Alive. He will be joined by Skerik, Yuka Honda, Spencer Zahn, Mauro Refosco, and Ian Chang. This weekend’s set will find Harrington and friends focusing heavily on electronic, improvisation-based music in an attempt to open things up to a world of psychedelic grooves—akin to the Acid Tests of the mid-60’s. Following Dave Harrington’s Merry Pranksters’ set, Marc Brownstein of The Disco Biscuits will lay down a special DJ set from 2 am to 3:30 at Music Hall of Williamsburg.Inspired by the vibrant musical communities of Brooklyn and New Orleans, Brooklyn Comes Alive is set to take place across three venues in Williamsburg, Brooklyn (Brooklyn Bowl, Schimanski, Music Hall of Williamsburg) on September 23rd and 24th. The unique homegrown event puts the focus on the musicians, curating dream team collaborations, tributes, and artist passion projects for two full days of incredible music both new and old.The 2017 lineup is set to include hand-selected band lineups featuring all-star musicians like John Scofield, George Porter Jr. (The Meters), Vinnie Amico and Al Schnier (moe.), Bernard Purdie, Joel Cummins, Ryan Stasik, and Kris Myers (Umphrey’s McGee), Aron Magner and Marc Brownstein (The Disco Biscuits), Mike Greenfield and Jesse Miller (Lotus), Jason Hann (String Cheese Incident), Alan Evans (Soulive), Cyril Neville (Neville Brothers), Henry Butler, Reed Mathis (Electric Beethoven), Michael League, Nate Werth, Chris Bullock, Robert “Sput” Searight, and Bob Lanzetti (Snarky Puppy), Jennifer Hartswick and Natalie Cressman (Trey Anastasio Band), and scores of others!last_img read more

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From Tonga to Tercentenary

first_imgThis is one in a series of profiles showcasing some of Harvard’s stellar graduates.Many students come from great distances to learn at Harvard, but few have traversed such disparate worlds as Moana ′Ulu′ave. You might even say her journeys would make a fantastic story.Born to parents and grandparents from the South Pacific island nation of Tonga, ′Ulu′ave, 26, grew up among the frosty peaks of Salt Lake City, Utah, where her family settled in 1986 to find better economic and educational opportunities and to be close to the spiritual heart of their Mormon faith.Her grandfather once farmed taro and manioc (cassava) roots; her mother, Losaline, works at a book bindery; her father, Alama, was until recently a maintenance worker at the University of Utah. All set high expectations for ′Ulu′ave and her five sisters.“He used to drive us around and point out the law school and the medical school and say, ‘One day you’re going to come here,’” said ′Ulu′ave, a spoken-word storyteller and writer in the Arts in Education program at Harvard Graduate School of Education (HGSE), who is receiving her master’s degree. “I always thought it was strange that he didn’t have that dream for himself.”Despite living half a world away, Tonga’s rich cultural history and oral traditions were always close at hand. ′Ulu′ave’s grandmother is known as “a keeper of stories,” while her father often makes videos of storytelling to preserve them for future generations. “I grew up with them telling me stories,” she said. “I didn’t know I was learning those things, but the stories were everywhere. I just had to pick them up and tell them as well.”Beyond class, ′Ulu′ave helped lead a weekly writing course at a women’s prison in Framingham, Mass., as part of a program run by Boston University.“For me, prison means something different. I come from a working-class background. I have friends who are in prison. I look around and I think: These women could be any of my relatives in a lot of ways,” she said. “For a lot of women there, education is redemptive. You’ve been punished, that’s why you’re in prison, and the only thing of your own that you have is your mind. And here you are, exerting that power that you have to obtain a piece of paper that says ‘Hey, you’re still valuable in society.’”A Gates Millennium Scholarship winner, ′Ulu′ave graduated from Brigham Young University in 2012, leaving the familiar, communal comforts behind to live in Cambridge, “a place that has no context for me,” she said. “I was so surprised at how much the relationships here meant to me. I didn’t know I’d find community.”“Moana has got this incredible joy and humor, but she is a deeply and profoundly serious person,” said Steven Seidel, the Patricia Bauman and John Landrum Bryant Lecturer on Arts in Education and director of HGSE’s Arts in Education Program. “She’s enormously intellectually curious and hungry,” with a very clear sense of the importance and power of community, he said.′Ulu′ave received the Intellectual Contribution award, an honor given annually to one student in each HGSE master’s program.“So many of her peers nominated her for that award and spoke about being inspired by her as … one of the few Tongan students to ever come to Harvard,” said Seidel, “but also just as someone who is both growing and curious and evolving and also so deeply rooted in her values and the values of her culture. It’s been inspiring to all of us — certainly inspiring to me.”As the first in her family to earn an advanced degree, ′Ulu′ave said dozens of far-flung relatives will join her here to celebrate.“In terms of my community and my family, this is making real a lot of dreams that they’ve had for generations. And when I say, ‘I am graduating,’ the indigenous ‘I’ is always the ‘We.’ So, ‘We are graduating.’ I appreciate all the sacrifices that were made even before I stepped on this campus.”last_img read more

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For some Muslims, hope, uncertainty after travel ban lifted

first_imgPresident Joe Biden’s repeal of the Trump administration’s travel ban for several Muslim-majority nations brought a sigh of relief from those affected. But amid the celebrations are tales of dreams broken, families separated, savings used up and milestones missed, from births to graduations. There’s also uncertainty about the future: questions about backlogs, fees and travel restrictions due to the pandemic. Advocates for immigration and the rights of Muslims in the U.S. hail Biden’s decision, but also point to the work ahead to get lives back on track and roll back the ban’s legacy. Says one Yemeni man: “Making it to America is a big dream.”last_img read more

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Life celebrated at memorial mass

first_imgConnor Sorensen was a fighter.Friends said he fought playfully in annual games of Humans vs. Zombies on Notre Dame’s campus. In a more literal sense, Sorensen fought against lifelong lung disease and numerous health issues, a battle he ultimately lost Dec. 20, 2013.Friends and family gathered in the Morrissey Manor chapel Sunday afternoon to celebrate and remember Sorensen, who lived in Morrissey for three years before receiving his degree last fall.In his homily at the memorial mass, Fr. Ronald Vierling, the rector of Morrissey Manor, said Sorensen lived the virtue of faith and always fought with determination.“The important thing to know about Connor, I think, is that he fought the good fight,” Vierling said. “And although his body gave out, his spirit did not.”Senior Sean Brady, one of Sorensen’s close friends, said Sorensen’s toughness was evident throughout his entire life.“He was really tough. … There were times when he would try and handle his condition through sheer force of will,” Brady said. “He was so stubborn and so tough … It was amazing how tough he was and how self-confident and courageous he was.”Photo courtesy of Matt JewellBrady said Sorensen strove to make the most of his time at Notre Dame and fought to stay a part of the Notre Dame community as long as he could.“When he came here, he didn’t think he was going to be living very long, but he really wanted to come to Notre Dame and he really wanted to go to college,” Brady said. “He didn’t want to let the fact that he might not make it to his next birthday dictate his life, and so he came here and he fought to stay here … His doctors wanted him to leave before he did.”Senior Matt Jewell, who lived with Sorensen in Morrissey, said Sorensen refused to give up despite his physical condition.“He never quit,” Jewell said. “He might be slower than the group because his lungs were never functioning properly so he would have to slow down, but he would never stop. He would never quit.”Sorensen’s friend, senior John Mundaden, said Sorensen frequently defied others’ perceptions of his ability to live his life to the fullest.“You think you could define him by looking at him, but it never ceased to amaze me how tough he was and how brave he was,” Mundaden said. “There was nothing that he couldn’t do or wasn’t willing to try, whether that be playing sports with us or playing Humans vs. Zombies.”Jewell said Sorensen did not return to Notre Dame in the fall of 2013 for his senior year because his health deteriorated. Vierling said Sorenson still received his diploma from University Provost Tom Burish and the dean of the College of Science Gregory Crawford, who traveled to Sorenson’s home in Portage, Mich., to present it to him before his death in December.“He did officially graduate,” Jewell said. “He is officially a graduate of Notre Dame, which he and his family are extremely proud of, and rightfully so. He was able to complete all that he did, even with this hardship.”Jewell said Sorenson majored in biochemistry and described him as “the science guy” of their group of friends. He said Sorenson would have gone on to do great things if disease did not cut his life short.“He was probably going to do great things,” Jewell said. “He was brilliant with science and he was dedicated to finding cures for really anything he could because of his hardship. I think everyone lost out because he is not around.”Senior Chris Ayala, another of Sorensen’s friends, said Sorensen was a selfless person despite his health battles.“Connor was a very driven and passionate person and he lived out the ideal of putting others first before himself,” Ayala said. “Something remarkable about him is that he always had this desire to help people. In particular, he wanted to help people who were in the same position as him … so he would go to his doctors and he would read up on new treatments and basically volunteer himself for science to a point.”This selflessness was on display when Sorensen returned to Morrissey last November to tell his friends he did not have much time left, Mundaden said.“When he came by like a week before Thanksgiving to let us know basically that he was in hospice care, and his mentality is that he didn’t want to ruin our holidays,” Mundaden said. “That’s what he was worried about it.”Despite all of his health struggles, Jewell said Sorensen never breathed a word of complaint about his situation.“He would not accept special treatment or really any sort of pity or anything,” Jewell said. “He never complained once.”According to an online remembrance, Sorensen, in addition to participating in Humans vs. Zombies, played the saxophone in the Notre Dame hockey band his freshman year, performed chemistry research and attained the Boy Scouts of America’s highest rank of Eagle Scout.Through all of his hardship and strife, Vierling said Sorensen’s bravery and courage represented the spirit of Notre Dame in a unique way.“Connor’s attitude of defiance toward his illness and struggles represents the spirit of Notre Dame to a degree I don’t think others can,” Vierling said.Tags: Remembrancelast_img read more

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The Fans Have Spoken! Readers Rank the Best Dance Numbers on Broadway

first_img“A Musical” from SOMETHING ROTTEN! “Circle of Life” from THE LION KING “Shall We Dance?” from THE KING AND I “All that Jazz” from CHICAGO “Revolting Children” from MATILDA Broadway is all about flashy, showstopping dance numbers, and with musicals like An American in Paris and On the Town currently on the boards, it’s tough to pick just one favorite. Well, too bad, we’re making you! Broadway.com asked readers to rank the best dance numbers currently on Broadway on the top 10 ranking website Culturalist. The results are in—see who came out on top! “Turn It Off” from THE BOOK OF MORMONcenter_img “Masquerade” from THE PHANTOM OF THE OPERA “New York, New York” from ON THE TOWN View Comments “Dancing Through Life” from WICKED “Friend Like Me” from ALADDINlast_img read more

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White Water

first_imgWhen I was a kid we spent a week every summer near Ocean City Maryland. Many summers, our maternal grandfather would be part of our vacation. I remember holding his hand at the edge of the ocean—giggling and screaming as the salty waves crashed at our feet.Topsail Beach, NC“White Water,” we would yell in unison trying to hop over each crashing wave. “White Water!” If we missed the white foam, we felt victorious until the next wave rolled in.A few weeks ago I had the opportunity to go rafting on the New River near Fayetteville, West Virginia. My husband’s friend is an experienced paddler and had invited us to join him on the water for a day of fun.As we drove west we watched a strong summer storm engulf the mountains and valleys in grey, yellow streaks of color and fast moving clouds.http://rivermen.com/site/gauley-river-rafting-wv/By the time we got to the river’s edge, the clouds had cleared leaving clean blue sky, rocks, and water. The first set of rapids is called Pinball falls. As the water and our boat approached larger rocks, and our rubber raft began to twist and pull under our legs, I realized the White Water in the New River  is very different from that in the Atlantic. This White Water had power the small waves of the Atlantic did not.“White Water,” I thought to myself, helmet on, paddle in hand, trying to stay in our boat as water flew across my body.My parents live on the Gulf of Mexico. Their homes are surrounded by  light blue water and white beaches. When I visit, I am reminded how calming the gentle roll of the Gulf is – most often, no White Water, just white sand.BP announced this week that 75% of the oil had been collected and removed from the Gulf. Today, we were told by the FDA it is safe to eat Gulf seafood.White Water has new meaning, once again.I am at my desk today—no water in sight. But I can think of past trips to the ocean, swims in the bay, and days on the river . I am grateful for the many opportunities to giggle and screech and leap with delight, in White Water.What does white water mean to you?  last_img read more

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Nicaraguan Army Seizes Coca Shipment from Colombians and Hondurans

first_imgBy Dialogo January 28, 2011 The Nicaraguan Army seized 1.6 tons of cocaine that Colombian and Honduran drug traffickers threw into the sea while being chased by a military patrol, the Army’s press office announced on 26 January. A first seizure of 1,000 kg took place on 24 January during an anti-drug operation in the community of Tasbapaunie in Nicaragua’s South Atlantic Autonomous Region (RAAS), and another 643 kg were found the following day by Navy divers “trawling for the drugs” at sea, the note added. Three Colombians and three Hondurans were arrested in Monday’s operation, and a speedboat in which they tried to escape was confiscated.last_img read more

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Thaler calls CU leaders to action ahead of NAFCU’s Congressional Caucus

first_imgWith NAFCU’s Virtual Congressional Caucus kicking off on Monday, the association’s Vice President of Legislative Affairs Brad Thaler penned an op-ed in CU Today calling credit union leaders to action to advocate for the nation’s servicemembers.“As I write this, bank lobbyists are hard at work distorting the facts to trick Congress into treating for-profit mega-banks the same as local, not-for-profit credit unions when it comes to nominal leases on military bases,” wrote Thaler.As credit union advocates join NAFCU next week in the association’s advocacy efforts, Thaler asked credit union leaders to join in opposition to this banker-sought policy change regarding leases on military bases.  Under a provision in the Senate version of the FY 2021 National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA), the Department of Defense would be required to treat all for-profit banks and not-for-profit credit unions that same when it comes to nominal cost leases on military installations.“NAFCU is leading the fight with others in the credit union industry to ensure this misguided policy does not get included in the final 2021 NDAA – and we hope you will join us in this fight,” Thaler said. “This is what we do at NAFCU: We fight for credit unions, their 121 million members, and our local communities.” continue reading » ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

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Blinks by Move38 smart tabletop game system has futuristic, touch-sensitive game pieces » Gadget Flow

first_imgThe Blinks by Move38 smart tabletop game system offers a futuristic take on your gaming experience. Each blink is a hexagonal, touch-sensitive tile that can interact with the others. Providing a unique way to blend analog and digital play, each of the Blinks knows a different game. The coolest part? That tile can teach the other tiles how to play! So you just grab your Blink and pick your game, and then you’ll be playing in seconds. With this smart tabletop game system, you’ll get nine different games you can play. And now you can add on the Epic Adventure Expansion, which includes six totally new—and epic—tabletop games. They come from fresh game creators for brand-new adventures. No matter which game you choose, you’re going to love Blinks. – Advertisement –last_img read more

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