An Indian dance performance at Ed Portal

first_img“A Hundred Moons,” an Indian classical dance performance by Neha Bansal, was presented to a sold-out audience at the Harvard Ed Portal on Oct. 30.Bansal, a graduate student at the Harvard Kennedy School, shared her love of dance with the Ed Portal community. At the start of the program, the audience was encouraged to find their inner sound and rhythm within an active and noisy world.The performance was held close to the night of Diwali, a Hindu festival of lights, and focused on the love story of deities Krishna and Radha. Bansal’s delicate hand gestures and movements helped paint a picture of their relationship. The accompanying music was also composed by Bansal.“A Hundred Moons”  is just one among a variety of events that Harvard offers at the Ed Portal — as well as across Harvard’s campus and throughout the community. For more information about the Ed Portal, or to learn about upcoming events and programs, please visit its website.last_img read more

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Joey Slotnick Will Lead Dying For It Off-Broadway; Complete Cast Announced

first_img Dying For It Joey Slotnick will lead the American premiere of Dying For It. The Moira Buffini play, adapted from Nikolai Erdman’s The Suicide, will also feature an ensemble cast including Mia Barron, Ben Beckley, Nathan Dame, Patch Darragh, Clea Lewis, Peter Maloney Andrew Mayer, Mary Beth Peil, Jeanine Serralles, Robert Stanton and C.J. Wilson. The Atlantic Theater Company production will begin off-Broadway performances on December 11 at the Linda Gross Theater, where it will run through January 18, 2015. Opening night is set for January 8. Related Shows Show Closed This production ended its run on Jan. 18, 2015 Directed by Neil Pepe, Dying For It follows Semyon (Slotnick), a man down on his luck, married to a nag (Serralles), and out of options. When he decides to throw in the towel and kill himself, a deluge of sympathetic visitors descends upon him, determined to make him a martyr for their many causes. The play satirizes the hypocrisy and illogic of Soviet life and was banned by Stalin before ever hitting the stage.center_img Slotnick appeared on Broadway in The Big Knife; his additional off-Broadway and regional stage credits include Happy Hour, The New York Idea, Offices, Almost an Evening, our Town and Animal Crackers. Barron recently appeared off-Broadway in Domesticated and was previously seen on Broadway in The Coast of Utopia and QED. Beckley’s stage credits include Peter and the Starcatcher and Goldor $ Mythyka. Dame has served as music director and music supervisor for various regional theaters and off-Broadway, including productions at Berkshire Theatre Group, Geva Theatre and Playwrights Horizons. Darragh returns to the Atlantic after starring in the world premiere of The Jammer; he also appeared on Broadway in Our Town. Lewis also returns to the Atlantic, following Writer’s Block; her additional credits include Broadway’s Absurd Person Singular. Mayer recently appeared in The 12 – A New Rock Musical at Signature Theater. Maloney is a member of the Atlantic Theater, having performed in 21 plays with the company. Peil, a Broadway alum, is also an Atlantic Theater Company member; her credits there include The Threepenny Opera and Harper Regan. Serralles has appeared off-Broadway in the Atlantic’s The Jammer, as well as The Muscles in Our Toes and Paris Commune. Robert Stanton’s Broadway credits include A Free Man of Color, Mary Stuart and The Coast of Utopia. Wilson, who appeared on Broadway with Slotnick in The Big Knige, returns to the Atlantic after appeared in Our New Girl, Offices and The Voysey Inheritance. Dying For It will feature scenic design by Walt Spangler, costumes by Suttirat Larlarb and Moria Clinton, lighting design by David Weiner, sound design by Ben Truppin-Brown and original music by Josh Schmidt. View Commentslast_img read more

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Forest Forensics

first_imgThere are no bodies, no police tape, no cluster of curious onlookers.  Yet there is plenty of evidence of a historic ecological crime: the deforestation of the eastern United States and consequent massive loss of topsoil.  It began slowly at Jamestown and culminated quickly just a century ago in the Appalachian Mountains. Archives document the destruction of virtually all of the vast original eastern forests.  The woods remember, too.    35,000 tons of bark on way to Lea & McVitty Tannery in VA. Courtesy of the Bridgewater, VA Office of the U.S. Forest Some of the soil eroded from logging as well as poor agricultural practices was initially impounded in thousands of downstream mill ponds.  After water milling ended, the abandoned dams failed, and soil began moving downstream. It’s still moving. Called “legacy sediment,” it will “continue to contribute to stream turbidity into the foreseeable future,” concluded researchers at the University of North Carolina in 2013.  It is “a source of nutrients and trace elements [that] may add significantly to the degradation of downstream ecosystems such as the Chesapeake Bay,” according to research published in the journal Geology.  In 2017, the Chesapeake Bay Program held a Legacy Sediment Workshop to discuss remediation of “the enormous volumes of legacy sediment stored in valleys of the Chesapeake Bay watershed.”    Sign at Pisgah National Forest, NC ca. 1920s. Courtesy of the U.S. Forest Service. BIO:  Chris Bolgiano lives on 112 wooded acres on the border of the George Washington National Forest. By 1900, county ordinances required farmers to fence livestock in.  Barbed wire was patented in the 1870s, and by the 1920s was being nailed to living oaks as four billion American chestnut trees died from an imported fungus.  Some oaks have ingested the wire, and chestnut rail fences still molder in remote places, reminders of the loss of this most productive tree for both humans and wildlife.   Home-welded winch to pull up logs from slopes and hollows, ca. 1930s. On the author’s property. – C. Bolgiano But millennia of soil-building were lost.  Decades of regrowth now obscure the reduced fertility, but in 1943, a Forest Service report on the Virginia mountains noted that the better growing sites “because of fire or other past abuses are of low productivity.”   Less conspicuous than many-trunked trees are grey, lichen-spotted stumps, often embedded in moss, with the straight-edge cuts of a saw.  Whittle off a chip and the fresh, piney scent is a whiff of Christmas. Yet these trees may have been harvested in the late 1860s, when Virginia’s Shenandoah Valley farmers favored shortleaf and other yellow pines to rebuild barns burned during the Civil War.  Dr. James Finley, professor of forest history at Penn State University, assured me that, due to resin content, “Pine stumps can last a very long time.” They may be lasting longer than many barns. Shortleaf pines are less abundant now due to extensive harvesting, land clearing, and wildfire followed by fire suppression.                                                   Flat, unmarked hearths in the woods where trees were smoldered into charcoal are difficult to find, but hundreds of iron furnaces fueled by charcoal still stand along seams of ore down the mountains.  Iron making began by the mid-1700s. By the late 1800s, when coal replaced charcoal, hundreds of thousands of acres were being clearcut annually to produce hundreds of thousands of tons of iron.  Chestnut oaks – a different species — are common and often multiple-trunked in a ring of mature trunks leaning outward. A circle around the base of each trunk approximates the size of the mother trees, cut not for wood but for bark high in tannic acid.  Leather was a necessity before plastic, and tanning depended on acid leached from bark. Chestnut oaks are particularly good at stump sprouting, and deer had been severely overhunted by the early 1900s, so the sprouts escaped browsing. By the time synthetic chemicals replaced it around the 1940s, bark was being harvested by the millions of tons annually.  Naked logs were sometimes left in the woods to rot.  Old fences recall livestock.  But were animals fenced in or out?  European settlers brought the ancient tradition of access to forests regardless of ownership, for essentials like firewood, game, and forage.  They found Appalachian woodlands far more productive than in Europe, and loosed livestock to eat chestnuts and acorns across the mountainsides. They set out salt blocks to keep the animals near home, recollected today by places named “Lick.”  Often using rot-resistant American chestnut logs, farmers fenced livestock out of gardens and crops.    Image result for mossy creek furnace, vaCatherine Furnace, Massanutten Mountain, George Washington National Forest, VA. Courtesy of the U.S. Forest Service.center_img Clues in the woods to historic crimes against nature, and the consequences today Remains of a rail fence in Hardy County, WV. -C. Bolgiano Rain gushed down bare slopes, eroding deep trenches and carrying away tons of soil and stones.  Floods drowned thousands of people, ruined millions of dollars of property, and smothered streams with sediment.  So terrible was the immediate damage that Congress passed the Weeks Act in 1911, authorizing the establishment of eastern national forests.  With help from the Civilian Conservation Core during the 1930s, the U.S. Forest Service extinguished fires and built erosion fences. Ironically, the destruction of the most biodiverse temperate forest in the world led to a national forest commons now producing clean water, air, carbon sequestration, wildlife habitat and recreation for all.   Dr. Carole Nash, an archaeologist at James Madison University, said that “excavations on the South Fork of the Shenandoah River consistently demonstrate the impacts of logging on mountain soils.  It’s common to document three feet of alluvial deposits over the earliest levels of historic occupation in the 1740s. Below that, only an inch of soil takes you back in time a thousand years.”   Where did all that soil go? Accessible forests had been cut over, but railroads brought industrial-scale logging almost everywhere.  Higher slopes and ridges still had huge virgin trees many feet in diameter. Historians date the worst destruction from 1880 to 1930.  Hundreds of private timber companies had what was reported as a “cut out and get out” attitude. Steam equipment powered by wood or coal threw sparks that ignited slash left by loggers. Wildfires burned regeneration across entire mountainsides. If an old blackened skeleton leaves char on your fingers, it may have been a living tree killed by a hot fire, which renders some trees rot resistant.   Multiple stemmed chestnut oaks in the George Washington National Forest. -C. Bolgiano “The past is never dead,” wrote William Faulkner. “It’s not even past.”  Oak absorbing barbed wire. -C. Bolgiano 17Charcoal hearth, uncertain location, ca. 1900. Courtesy of the Edinburg, VA Office of the U.S. Forest Service.last_img read more

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Home for the holidays

first_img December 1, 2004 Regular News Home for the holidays Home for the Holidays THREE-YEAR-OLD Jacquez recently sat on the lap of 13th Circuit Judge Katherine Essrig when she told a smiling new adoptive mother, Rozetta Tibbs, that she could take her son home, which was just where he wanted to go, via a short detour to McDonald’s. On November 12, in recognition of National Adoption Day, Judge Essrig, Judge Martha Cook, and Judge J. Kevin Carey presided over more than 30 adoptions. “This is a special day when all we do is adoptions, which is a positive side of what we do,” Judge Essrig said. “We see children who have come from misfortune in various ways but now they have achieved permanency and are being adopted by loving and nurturing parents.” Essrig said the importance of the day is to let everyone know how special the kids are and “how much we value them.” Today, 399 children in Hillsborough County have a goal of adoption because the court has already granted termination of parental rights, but 217 do not have an identified family. That’s why Hillsborough Kids, Inc., organized the ceremony to publicize the efforts to find homes for the kids. The process to become an adoptive parent includes background checks, Model Approach to Partnerships in Parenting training, and home studies. The process can usually be completed within eight months. For more information about adoptions in Hillsborough County, contact Bridgett Barno at Camelot Community Care, (813) 635-9765.last_img read more

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Deer Park Crash Kills 2, Critically Injures 2

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York Two men were killed and a woman and her 3-year-old son were critically injured in a head-on crash in Deer Park on Friday afternoon.Suffolk County police said Robert Fattibene, 53, of Smithtown, was driving a Dodge Durango northbound on Commack Road when he crossed into the southbound lane and hit a Nissan Altima driven by 32-year-old Herver Leonel Garcia Munoz of Brentwood at 6:35 p.m.Both men were pronounced dead at the scene.Yesenia Marilu Martinez Vasquez, 24, a passenger in the Nissan, was airlifted to Stony Brook University Hospital.Justin Martinez, the toddler who was riding with his mother and father in the car, was taken to Good Samaritan Hospital Medical Center in West Islip. Both the mother and child are listed in critical condition.First Squad detectives impounded the vehicles for safety checks, are continuing the investigation and ask anyone with information about the crash to contact them at 631-854-8152.last_img read more

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Management company to push West End retail

first_imgTo access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week. Would you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletterslast_img

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Crystal gazing

first_imgTo access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week. Would you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletterslast_img

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iPhone makers suspend India production due to lockdown

first_imgFoxconn and Wistron have suspended production at their India plants, which include the assembly of some Apple iPhone models, in order to comply with a nationwide lockdown ordered by Prime Minister Narendra Modi.Foxconn, also known as Hon Hai Precision Industry, is suspending operations until April 14, the company said in a text message to Bloomberg News. It intends to resume India production based on further government announcements. A Wistron representative said the company is also adhering to the order, while declining to comment on exactly what products are affected.The surprise announcement of a 21-day lockdown was issued by Modi in a televised address to the nation on Tuesday evening. “For a few days forget what it means to go out. Today’s decision of a nationwide lockdown draws a line outside your home,” the PM said.Apple has an office with thousands of employees in Hyderabad, working on Apple Maps data. They too are likely to be impacted by the government’s virus-fighting measures, which are among the strictest that any country has yet imposed against the spread of the coronavirus.Topics :last_img read more

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France’s ERAFP in debut foreign property purchase

first_imgHenrik Bastman, AXA Real Estate head of asset management in the Nordic Region, said the region’s ”robust economic fundamentals have proved their resilience in recent years”.ERAFP also uses CBRE Global Investors, LaSalle Investment and AEW Europe as managers, as well as Amundi and La Française Real Estate as standby managers. ERAFP, the pension fund for French civil servants, has bought a Stockholm office property for SEK 546m (€60.4m).AXA Real Estate Investment Managers bought the prime Blåfjäll 1 building in Kista on behalf of ERAFP. The purchase is the fund’s first to be made outside France.The €17bn pension fund mandated AXA in July last year to source investments for its first venture into European real estate. ERAFP could invest up to €350m of capital over the next three years in the sector.AXA Real Estate was specifically asked to source and manage a portfolio of unlisted property assets, with a focus on the office and retail sectors. Blåfjäll 1 is currently fully-let following renovation to Ericsson, which has its headquarters next door.last_img read more

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LGPS advisory board to call for MiFID II exemption for asset pools

first_imgThe timing of the reclassification of UK local government pension schemes (LGPS) as retail investors under new MiFID rules poses “a significant challenge” to the asset-pooling project underway in the sector, according to the LGPS scheme advisory board for England and Wales.It is planning to call on the regulator to exempt the emerging LGPS asset pools from a MiFID rule it sees as preventing local authority pension funds from accessing “the full range” of assets offered by a pool.The Financial Conduct Authority (FCA) is carrying out a third consultation on implementation of the revised Markets in Financial Instruments Directive (MiFID II), with a deadline of 4 January 2017 for comments.The revised EU directive comes into effect on 3 January 2018. The new rules are controversial within the local authority pension fund sector because they reclassify administering authorities as retail investors.Under the original directive, asset managers were allowed to treat local authorities as professional investors automatically.The Local Government Association warned about such a move more than year ago.The advisory board for the LGPS Scheme is due to reiterate many of these concerns but also address the negative implications for pooling in feedback to the FCA’s consultation, a draft of which it approved at a meeting earlier this week.This describes the reclassification of local authorities as retail clients as “unnecessary” and says that “properly considered investment strategies will be placed at serious risk”.It singles out infrastructure, saying the reclassification is “inconsistent” with the government’s desire for more investment from local authority pension funds in this area.This has been a big driver behind the government’s instruction for the LGPS to form asset pools, a project they have been working on fervently for the past year.The scheme advisory board’s draft consultation response challenges the feasibility of local authorities being able to “opt up”, as the move has been described, to “elected professional status”, and the effectiveness of that route.It is due to argue that asset pools “could provide an alternative to elected professional status, with assistance from [the] FCA”.By “assistance” from the FCA, the scheme advisory board appears to mean the regulator exempting asset pools “in their own right” from a rule prohibiting retail clients from being sold “non-mainstream pooled investments”.These exemptions – of which there are 13, including elected professional client status – “could provide a means of local authorities accessing the full range of assets offered by the pool”, according to the advisory board.Where they operate collective investment schemes, an exemption for asset pools would allow pension funds to participate in the full range of assets being offered without having to go through the process of upgrading to professional status, the board argues.It says the opting-up process would still be necessary where pools did not operate collective investment schemes or where local pension funds continued to invest outside these.Several of the pools have decided to set up authorised contractual schemes (ACS), a tax-transparent type of collective investment vehicle, although many of the pools’ submissions to the government have indicated that illiquid assets would remain outside the pools for the time being.last_img read more

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