Disney Announces Plan to Furlough Most Employees Beginning April 18

first_imgDisney announced Thursday afternoon that beginning April 19, it will furlough employees whose jobs “are not necessary at this time.”“The COVID-19 pandemic is having a devastating impact on our world with untold suffering and loss and has required all of us to make sacrifices. Over the last few weeks, mandatory decrees from government officials have shut down a majority of our businesses,” Disney says in a statement.Employees have received their full pay and benefits since the parks closed on March 15. They will be paid through April 18.“While our world looks very different today, one thing endures…the American flag still flies over Walt Disney World.” – Walt Disney World Resort President Josh D’Amaro. Full story: https://t.co/rVpJZlEmiz #DisneyCastLife #DisneyMagicMoments #MagicKingdom pic.twitter.com/IRADgNVi08— Disney Parks (@DisneyParks) April 1, 2020 “With no clear indication of when we can restart our businesses, we’re forced to make the difficult decision to take the next step and furlough employees whose jobs aren’t necessary at this time,“ Disney’s statement continues.Any impacted worker will remain a Disney employee through the entire furlough period and continue to receive full healthcare benefits.last_img read more

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Syracuse’s NCAA tournament hopes hang in balance after being crushed by North Carolina

first_img Facebook Twitter Google+ On March 14, 1998, Syracuse played Maryland in the first Division I women’s lacrosse game for SU. The Orange allowed 21 goals, the most it has ever given up. In the 397 ensuing games for Syracuse since, that’s happened on just one more occasion: Boston College’s win to knock Syracuse out of last year’s NCAA tournament. That was until Thursday.No. 19 Syracuse (9-9, 1-6 Atlantic Coast) fell to No. 5 North Carolina (13-3, 6-1), 21-12, in the first round of the ACC tournament in Durham, N.C. UNC’s eight-goal margin at the end of the first half was simply too much for the Orange to overcome. A bubble team heading into the conference tournament, SU will have to wait more than a week to find out its NCAA tournament fate.“They’re a very good team, they rode hard,” SU head coach Gary Gait said. “They hustled their butts off and made some plays.”UNC had frequent opportunities. The Tar Heels had tallied 29 shots, including 23 on goal, where Syracuse starting goalie Asa Goldstock lasted just more than six minutes, allowing seven goals, before being pulled. If not for stellar play from SU freshman Hannah Van Middelem in goal, including multiple saves that came off of point-blank shots and nine total first-half saves, the Orange could have trailed by an even wider margin at halftime. “We know (Van Middelem’s) a great young goalie,” Gait said. “Asa (Goldstock’s) been playing well, though, so she hasn’t been able to play much.”AdvertisementThis is placeholder textFive players scored for the Tar Heels in the first half, all with at least two goals. Ela Hazar put up a hat trick and three assists, and Jamie Ortega added her own hat trick. UNC dominated the first half draw, 13-8. The Tar Heels caused nine first-half turnovers by SU, compared to zero caused by the Orange. The rout was on from the opening whistle.“They got after it early,” Gait said. “And again, we couldn’t clear the ball. Made a lot of mistakes, lot of turnovers. And you give a team like that to play offense, they’re going to score goals, and they did.”UNC scored the game’s first three goals before Syracuse could notch one. Then, the next four went to North Carolina as well, before SU added its second. Four more to the Tar Heels, and the game was 10-2 in favor of UNC less than 16 minutes in. Even with the Orange scoring four of the next five goals, that deficit was insurmountable. In the second half, the Tar Heels kept on coming. Ortega finished with six goals. UNC’s goalies combined to save eight of SU’s 20 shots on goal, plenty to back up a powerful offensive showing. SU’s only form of life on offense came from Emily Hawryschuk, who finished with five goals to push her to 54 for the season. The sophomore scored the first goal of the second half to try to give the Orange life. But what was still a seven-goal deficit then never got closer.“We scored on a decent number of our opportunities,” Gait said. “… We just didn’t get many shots.”After Syracuse’s last regular season game — a win over Louisville on Sunday — SU head coach Gary Gait thought back to the Orange’s regular-season matchup with North Carolina a few weeks ago. Syracuse lost by nine goals in the Carrier Dome with what, Gait said, was “flat” play right from the outset. The Orange had scored the final 11 goals of its Senior Day game. But Gait warned that on Thursday against UNC, it would be a new game and that he hoped SU would avoid coming out flat. Unfortunately for the Orange, the result wouldn’t be any different.Now, all Syracuse can do is wait. The NCAA tournament selection show was on May 7 last year, more than a week away, although the NCAA hasn’t updated the date for this year’s selection. Regardless, SU can’t make any more statements on the field. “We wait a week, get ready, and see what happens,” Gait said. “… Try and make sure we’re ready and if we get a chance to play in the tournament, we’re ready and we get a better result than we did here today.” Comments Published on April 26, 2018 at 8:16 pm Contact Billy: wmheyen@syr.edu | @Wheyen3last_img read more

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Trump v Mueller how the president won the messaging wars

first_imgShare on Twitter Trump v Mueller: how the president won the messaging wars He failed because he simply couldn’t bring himself to go just a little bit into common language and just say the simple, plain truthCotter This article is more than 1 month old Reuse this content This article is more than 1 month old Special counsel Robert Mueller makes a statement about the Russia investigation at the Department of Justice on 29 May.Photograph: Carolyn Kaster/AP Email Tue 11 Jun 2019 02.00 EDT Last modified on Tue 11 Jun 2019 07.59 EDT Topics Share on Facebook Share via Email Shares300300 In so many ways, Robert Mueller was the right man for the job.The former special counsel was fast, precise, ran a tight ship and, working in a hyper-partisan environment under the full glare of history, Mueller managed to investigate and document a historic attack on the United States while retaining the public trust.But one week after Mueller first spoke out about his investigation of Russian election tampering and the Donald Trump campaign, concern has sharpened that in one big way – potentially the biggest way – Mueller was exactly the wrong man for the job.For when the pursuit of justice took Mueller into unprecedented terrain – as the special counsel’s investigation came under sustained public attack by the president and the attorney general, William Barr – Mueller failed, his critics say, both to stand up for his investigation and to get the word out to the American people about what he had found.“To my mind, this is a Shakespearean-level tragedy,” said Patrick Cotter, a former federal prosecutor who was part of the team that convicted the Gambino family boss John Gotti. “It is the tragedy of the principled person, who is constrained by principle, being opposed by the completely unprincipled – Barr, and the president, and their lackeys.“The principled are chained, and the unprincipled romp free. And in a debate over reality, the unprincipled will always win, because they will just lie, and they will make reality whatever they want it to be.” Share on WhatsApp Share on Pinterest Share on Messenger Donald Trump Since you’re here… Congressional Democrats convened hearings on the Mueller report on Monday, and the judiciary committee chairman, Jerry Nadler, has said he would call Mueller to testify about the 11 instances of potentially criminal obstruction of justice committed by Donald Trump and his campaign that the Mueller report documents.But Mueller has refused, and has said he will continue to refuse, in discussions of his findings, to go beyond the language in his report, which declines to weigh evidence against the president while leaving open the possibility that crimes were committed.“If we had had confidence that the president clearly did not commit a crime, we would have said so,” Mueller said at his news conference on 29 May, in a minor paraphrase of a memorably coy phrase from the document.But against the full firepower of Trump’s Twitter account – “No collusion, no obstruction”, it chants – and Barr’s strategic misrepresentations, Mueller’s indirect language fails to communicate to the American people the basic facts of the president’s egregious misconduct, critics say.“Mueller went out like a lamb in his remarks Wednesday, when the country needed a lion,” columnist David Ignatius wrote in the Washington Post. “He was so polite and deferential, so insistent on following Justice Department rules limiting his actions that, in practical terms, he ceded the ground to Trump and his apologists.”There is no denial that Mueller, the starched former marine and FBI director, has been caught in a dilemma. To get out the truth about his report, he would need to go beyond its forensic discussion of the evidence, to characterize the thrust of that evidence. But to do that would, in Mueller’s view, be unfair to Trump, who as a sitting president cannot be indicted, according to justice department guidelines, and so cannot have his proverbial day in court to answer the charges against him. It is the tragedy of the principled person, who is constrained by principle, being opposed by the completely unprincipledPatrick Cotter Tom McCarthy in New York Share on Twitter Share on LinkedIn The latest major Trump resignations and firings US politics Trump-Russia investigation Robert Mueller … we have a small favour to ask. The Guardian will engage with the most critical issues of our time – from the escalating climate catastrophe to widespread inequality to the influence of big tech on our lives. At a time when factual information is a necessity, we believe that each of us, around the world, deserves access to accurate reporting with integrity at its heart.More people are reading and supporting The Guardian’s independent, investigative journalism than ever before. And unlike many news organisations, we have chosen an approach that allows us to keep our journalism accessible to all, regardless of where they live or what they can afford. But we need your ongoing support to keep working as we do.Our editorial independence means we set our own agenda and voice our own opinions. Guardian journalism is free from commercial and political bias and not influenced by billionaire owners or shareholders. This means we can give a voice to those less heard, explore where others turn away, and rigorously challenge those in power.We need your support to keep delivering quality journalism, to maintain our openness and to protect our precious independence. Every reader contribution, big or small, is so valuable. Support The Guardian from as little as $1 – and it only takes a minute. Thank you. Trump-Russia investigation It’s not Mueller’s job as he sees it to interpret his findings. It is his job to present them, not for the justice department to further pursue, but perhaps for Congress to take up.“People on cable TV say Mueller needs to get out there and be an advocate,” said Harry Sandick, a former assistant US attorney in the southern district of New York. “But if he did that, he wouldn’t be Mueller. That’s not who this person is, and the very reason why he has such credibility is because he didn’t engage in that sort of ongoing commentary.”But others argue that Mueller has a greater duty in this case than painstaking adherence to a playbook written for prosecutors applying the law in quotidian matters. As perhaps the only person with the authority to cut through Trump’s lies about the Mueller report and to point the way toward justice, Mueller, by this view, has a national duty to call out the president’s lies and to tell the country, using plain language, what he found. Critics say Mueller failed to stand up for his investigation and to get the word out to the American people about what he found Share on Facebook “He saw the problem,” Cotter said, referring to the Trump administration campaign of lies about the report. “He recognized that he had to do something to try to fix it because it’s really important. But he failed. He failed because he simply couldn’t bring himself to go just a little bit into common language and just say the simple, plain truth.”Preet Bharara, the former US attorney in the southern district of New York, thought that in his only public address in the two years of his investigation, Mueller seemed unusually drawn.“It was the same Bob Mueller,” Bharara said on his podcast. “He seemed a little less strong in his manner than he usually does. He seemed a little bit more reluctant than I’ve seen him before, at other events.”Mueller’s relatively mild presentation was a refreshing change from the typically overheated quality of the national discourse, said Sandick, who was one of more than 1,000 former federal prosecutors and justice department officials to co-sign a letter saying that the Mueller report documents conduct that would be chargeable as criminal were it committed by anyone but the president.“Hasn’t our national debate been coarsened enough, and shouldn’t we appreciate the old-school attributes of somebody like Bob Mueller, who declined to engage in hand-to-hand combat with 140 characters?” asked Sandick.“Prosecutors aren’t television hosts. They’re not entertainers, and they should do their talking in the courtroom and in their court filings. It’s not their job to wage the battle of public opinion. It’s their job to investigate and prosecute crimes.”But in fulfilling a prescribed duty, Mueller failed a higher one, said Cotter.“I think what America needed at this moment was a slightly less strictly principled person,” he said, “who was willing to actually take the heat for being arguably somewhat less than 100% principled in the legal construct, and just talk to people in plain, simple language.” Share via Email Support The Guardian @TeeMcSee Trump administration Read more newslast_img read more

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