NASA Researchers, Doctors Treat First Known Blood Clot in Space

first_imgWhen astronauts suddenly experience a medical situation on the International Space Station 250 miles above Earth, the terms “emergency room” or “urgent care” take on a unique meaning.Late last year, NASA researchers suspected that one of their astronauts was suffering from a blood clot during a long duration stay on the space station.The clot was detected during a vascular study of 11 astronauts that was intended to assess the effect of space on the internal jugular vein. In zero gravity, astronauts’ blood and tissue fluid shifts toward the head.The study involved nine men and two women who were an average age of 46. Their identities were not included in the study.A new assessment of the blood clot was published last Thursday in the New England Journal of Medicine.Six of the participating astronauts experienced stagnant or reverse blood flow, another one had a blood clot, and yet another was considered to have a potential partial blood clot.Scientists weighed the risk of the blood clot, as well as its potential to block a vessel in the absence of gravity.Dr. Stephen Moll, from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill’s School of Medicine, was the only non-NASA physician who was consulted to help the affected astronaut.He says, “My first reaction when NASA reached out to me was to ask if I could visit the International Space Station to examine the patient myself. NASA told me they couldn’t get me up to space quickly enough, so I proceeded with the evaluation and treatment process from here in Chapel Hill.”Moll is a member of UNC’s Blood Research Center and is a blood clot expert.“Normally the protocol for treating a patient with deep vein thrombosis would be to start them on blood thinners for at least three months to prevent the clot from getting bigger and to lessen the harm it could cause if it moved to a different part of the body such as the lungs,” Moll adds. “There is some risk when taking blood thinners that if an injury occurs, it could cause internal bleeding that is difficult to stop. In either case, emergency medical attention could be needed. Knowing there are no emergency rooms in space, we had to weigh our options very carefully.”He spoke with the astronaut during a “phone call from space,” consulting with them as if the person were one of his other patients.The pharmacy aboard the space station contained 20 vials with 300 milligrams each of an injectable blood thinner. Moll directed the astronaut to use them on a daily basis until an anticoagulant drug could be sent to the station during a resupply mission.The astronaut took a higher dose of the injectable, called enoxaparin, for 33 days in order to control the risk of the blood clot. The dose was lowered after that time, as the astronaut awaited the arrival of the drug apixaban.The researchers watched the clot shrink over time. Blood flow was then induced after 47 days through the vein, although spontaneous blood flow was not achieved, even after undergoing treatment for 90 days.The blood clot disappeared 24 hours after landing. Six months later, the astronaut was still free of symptoms.According to Dr. Serena Auñón-Chancellor, study author, NASA astronaut and clinical associate professor of medicine at Louisiana State University’s Health New Orleans School of Medicine, “We still haven’t learned everything about Aerospace Medicine or Space Physiology.”She adds, “The biggest question that remains is how would we deal with this on an exploration class mission to Mars? How would we prepare ourselves medically? More research must be performed to further elucidate clot formation in this environment and possible countermeasures.”last_img read more

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Manhunt in Polk County after Triple Murder at Campsite

first_imgPolk County officials are searching for suspects in the murder of three friends on a fishing trip.Around 10 pm Friday, 23-year old Damon Tillman arrived to the remote area to go fishing with his friends.Officials say as he was being beaten to death, 30-year old Keven Springfield and 27-year old Brandon Rollins showed up and were shot.Rollins called his dad, Cyril Rollins, who then showed up to the scene.Son calls fatherInvestigators are not revealing what the victim told his father on the phone before he died and whether or not he identified the killer or killers.last_img read more

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Dungey, Philips, Bennett named to All-Atlantic Coast Conference team after Clemson upset

first_img Published on October 16, 2017 at 2:28 pm Contact Matthew: mguti100@syr.edu | @MatthewGut21 Syracuse’s Eric Dungey, Ervin Philips and Parris Bennett all made the Week 7 All-Atlantic Coast Conference team, the ACC announced Monday afternoon. It’s the first time in SU’s four and a half years in the ACC that three players made the team in a single week.Syracuse (4-3, 2-1 Atlantic Coast) shocked the country Friday night in the Carrier Dome with a 27-24 victory over then-No. 2 Clemson (6-1, 4-1). Dungey, a junior quarterback, was 20-for-32 with 278 yards through the air and tied his career high with three touchdown passes. He accounted for 339 of the Orange’s 440 yards of total offense. He rushed for 61 yards, too, making him the sixth QB in program history to run for at least 1,000 career yards.Dungey’s big drive came in the fourth quarter, when he lead SU to a 16-play, six-minute march down the field leading to a go-ahead field goal with 9:41 left. Facing a third-and-long on Syracuse’s final possession, Dungey ran for eight yards to get a first down, milk the clock seal the win.It’s Dungey’s first such honor this year. As a sophomore, he earned two ACC Offensive Back of the Week honors last year in SU’s wins against then-No. 17 Virginia Tech and Boston College.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textAndy Mendes | Digital Design EditorDungey’s top target Friday night was Philips, a senior wide receiver who has broken out this season. Two weeks ago, Philips was named ACC Receiver of the Week after he broke the conference record for receptions in a game (17). Against the Tigers, he had four catches for a game-high 94 yards and a touchdown. He caught a 66-yard touchdown — Syracuse’s longest pass play of the season — to bump the Orange’s lead to 14-7 early.Philips moved to 10th place on SU’s career record list for receiving yardage (1,734) and ranks sixth among active FBS receivers and second on SU’s all-time list with 190 career catches.On the other side of the ball, Bennett, a senior linebacker whose ascension to the top of Syracuse’s defense is rooted in Detroit, led Syracuse in tackles for the fifth consecutive game. He had nine stops, including the first sack of his career — an eight-yard loss for Clemson in the third quarter. After the sack, CU did not get another first down that drive and missed the ensuing field goal attempt.The Syracuse defense allowed only 113 yards rushing, more than 124 yards fewer than Clemson’s season average (237.3). Clemson collected 154 fewer yards of total offense than its season average. The ACC Linebacker of the Week honor is Bennett’s second this season. Following the LSU game Sept. 23, Bennett was named ACC Linebacker of the Week for his 12-tackle showing.Syracuse plays next at No. 8 Miami on Saturday at 3:30. The game will air on ESPN. Hurricanes junior wide receiver Darrell Langham and senior kicker Michael Badgley also earned ACC honors this week in Miami’s win over Georgia Tech. Comments Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more

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